Belfast Shipbuilders

This book traces the growth of the ship building industry in Belfast via stories from the small number of families responsible.

Author: Stephen Cameron

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781906578787

Category: Shipbuilders

Page: 208

View: 907


Forgotten Shipbuilders of Belfast

This book highlights the achievements of the largely forgotten Belfast firm of shipbuilders. Workman, Clark. Known locally as ihe Wee \.ird., thanks to the presence ol Harland and Wolff, its larger and better known neighbour, Workman, ...

Author: Workman, Clark & Co

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Northern Ireland

Page: 61

View: 501

The shipbuilding & engineering works of Workman, Clark & Co., shipbuilders & engineers was originally published by McCaw, Stevenson & Orr, Belfast, 1903; Shipbuilding at Belfast was first published by J. Burrow, London and Cheltenham, 1933.

An Unlikely Success Story

This book offers the first history of the whole spectrum of the Belfast shipbuilding industry. It is the story of the yards and the ships.

Author: John P. Lynch

Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation

ISBN: 9780953960439

Category: Social Science

Page: 75

View: 766

This book offers the first history of the whole spectrum of the Belfast shipbuilding industry. It is the story of the yards and the ships. Beyond that it explores the social conditions and workplace environment of the tens of thousands whom this great industry embraced.


Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

The originator of Belfast's shipbuilding industry , William Ritchie , was yet another native of Saltcoats and came to Belfast in March 1791 to explore the potential for shipbuilding in the area . At the behest of the local merchants who ...

Author: Kyle Hughes

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748679936

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 191

A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

The Shipbuilding Industry

HARLAND & WOLFF plc Queen's Island , Belfast , Antrim History : In 1853 Robert Hickson laid out a yard on Queen's ... In 1935 the company incorporated into its works some of the premises of the bankrupt Belfast shipbuilders Workman ...

Author: L. A. Ritchie

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719038051

Category: Shipbuilding industry

Page: 206

View: 479

This work aims to facilitate the study of the shipbuilding industry by making available information on the present location of shipbuilding archives. The brief histories of about 200 businesses are offered.

Ireland and the Industrial Revolution

Shipyard', Ulster Folklife 41 (1995), pp. 19–25. 28 Shipbuilding at Belfast 1880–1893: Workman and Clarke (Belfast,1928),p. 26; Lynch, 'The Belfast Shipbuilding Industry 1919–1933', p. 22. 29 Lynch, 'Belfast's Third Shipyard', p.19.

Author: Andy Bielenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134061005

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 126

This monograph provides the first comprehensive analysis of industrial development in Ireland and its impact on Irish society between 1801-1922. Studies of Irish industrial history to date have been regionally focused or industry specific. The book addresses this problem by bringing together the economic and social dimensions of Irish industrial history during the Union between Ireland and Great Britain. In this period, British economic and political influences on Ireland were all pervasive, particularly in the industrial sphere as a consequence of the British industrial revolution. By making the Irish industrial story more relevant to a wider national and international audience and by adopting a more multi-disciplinary approach which challenges many of the received wisdoms derived from narrow regional or single industry studies - this book will be of interest to economic historians across the globe as well as all those interested in Irish history more generally.

Ships and Shipbuilders

Shortly after completing his apprenticeship he joined the marine engineering branch of the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. He would stay with them for around fifty years until his retirement in the early 1960s. A well-read man, ...

Author: Fred M Walker

Publisher: Seaforth Publishing

ISBN: 1848320728

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 351

In the past three centuries the ship has developed from the relatively unsophisticated sail-driven vessel which would have been familiar to the sailors of the Tudor navy, to the huge motor-driven container ships, nuclear submarines and vast cruise liners that ply our seas today. Who were the innovators and builders who, during that span of time, prompted and instigated the most significant advances? In the past three centuries the ship has developed from the relatively unsophisticated sail-driven vessel which would have been familiar to the sailors of the Tudor navy, to the huge motor-driven container ships, nuclear submarines and vast cruise liners that ply our seas today. Who were the innovators and builders who, during that span of time, prompted and instigated the most significant advances? In this new book the author describes the lives and deeds of more the 120 great engineers, scientists, philosophers, businessmen, shipwrights, naval architects and inventors who shaped ship design and shipbuilding world wide. Covering the story chronologically, and going back briefly even to Archimedes, such well-known names as Anthony Deane, Peter the Great, James Watt, Robert Fulton and Isambard Kingdom Brunel share space with lesser known characters like the luckless Frederic Sauvage, a pioneer of screw propulsion who, unable to interest the French navy in his tests in the early 1830s, was bankrupted and landed in debtor’s prison. With the inclusion of such names as Ben Lexcen, the Australian yacht designer who developed the controversial winged keel for the 1983 America’s Cup, the story is brought right up to date. Concise linking chapters place all these innovators in context so that a clear and fascinating history of the development of ships and shipbuilding emerges from the pages. An original and important new reference book.