Prehistoric Britain from the Air

It represents one of the most important archives of geographical , topographical
and archaeological information in Britain . The Cambridge Air Surveys series
aims to make accessible select groups of the University's aerial photographs to ...

Author: Timothy Darvill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521551328

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 918

A survey of the monumental achievements of Britain's earliest inhabitants, highly illustrated with a wonderful selection of aerial photographs.


Britain from the Air

In this, his latest collection of aerial photographs in Britain, he has trained his camera on the fields of Hampshire, the beaches of Norfolk, the Cardiff skyline and the oil rigs of the North Sea. Familiar parts of .

Author: Jason Hawkes

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780749565657

Category: Great Britain

Page: 192

View: 925

Jason Hawkes, Britain's leading aerial photographer, has been taking to the skies with his camera for more than fifteen years. In this, his latest collection of aerial photographs, he has trained his camera on the fields of Hampshire, the beaches of Norfolk, the Cardiff skyline and the oil rigs of the North Sea. Familiar parts of the country take on a new dimension when viewed from above, and this book lets you see landmarks as you've never seen them before. Photographs are accompanied by informative text from award-winning travel author Mike Gerrard, which tells you more about the subject you can see in the picture. Five features give greater detail about certain aspects of the British landscape. These include Britain's coastline, cathedrals and castles, industrial heritage, maritime Britain and literary landscapes.

Prehistoric Britain from the Air

This volume constitutes a bird's eye journey through prehistoric Britain, with photographs by Jason Hawkes.

Author: Janet Bord

Publisher: Phoenix

ISBN: 9780753807071

Category: Aerial photography in archaeology

Page: 160

View: 481

The landscape of Britain is scattered with the haunting traces of prehistoric man: the causeway camps and henges of the New Stone Age, the stone circles and standing stones of the Bronze Age and those feats of landscape engineering, the great hill forts of the Iron Age. This volume constitutes a bird's eye journey through prehistoric Britain, with photographs by Jason Hawkes. Janet and Colin Bord people them with the denizens of the past: the myths and legends are decodified, and the archaeological record is combed, to provide an account of how each site was used and to reconstruct the patterns of early man.


Britain s Changing Environment from the Air

Commercial pressures and mechanization have rendered almost unrecognizable the natural and man-made landscapes of Britain as they existed before World War I. How this happened and how we can best conserve what is left is charted using the ...

Author: Tim Bayliss-Smith

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521327121

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 999

Commercial pressures and mechanization have rendered almost unrecognizable the natural and man-made landscapes of Britain as they existed before World War I. How this happened and how we can best conserve what is left is charted using the perspective of aerial photography in this book.




Britain from the Air

Features aerial photographs that show Britain's monuments, countryside and cities.

Author: Ian Hay

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781847461315

Category:

Page:

View: 116

Features aerial photographs that show Britain's monuments, countryside and cities.




Annals of Influenza Or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever in Great Britain from 1510 to 1837

Others , as was before observed , were of opinion , that the cause of the disease ,
however different it might be from the sensible qualities of the atmosphere , was
yet conveyed by the air , from place to place ; ' and one gentleman , who seems ...

Author: Theophilus Thompson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Catarrh

Page: 406

View: 333

Includes writings of various authors concerning different epidemics in Great Britain during the 16th-19th centuries.

The Blackout in Britain and Germany 1939 1945

Air raid precautions in this book are referred to as ARP, whether British or
German. 2. On this see Carolyn Kitching, Britain and the Problem of International
Disarmament, 1919–1934 (London: Routledge, 1999). 3. J. B. S. Haldane, ARP ...

Author: Marc Wiggam

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319754718

Category: History

Page: 131

View: 260

This book is the first major study of the blackout in the Second World War. Developing a comparative history of this system of civil defense in Britain and Germany, it begins by exploring how the blackout was planned for in both countries, and how the threat of aerial bombing framed its development. It then examines how well the blackout was adhered to, paying particular regard to the tension between its military value and the difficulties it caused civilians. The book then moves on to discuss how the blackout undermined the perception of security on the home front, especially for women. The final chapter examines the impact of the blackout on industry and transport. Arguing that the blackout formed an integral part in mobilising and legitimating British and German wartime discourses of community, fairness and morality, the book explores its profound impact on both countries.


Air Officer Commanding

During the first year of World War I, he served with distinction as a combat pilot in France, but his real test would come in 1936, when he was assigned the critical task of reorganizing the Air Defense of Great Britain as the first air ...

Author: John T. LaSaine, Jr.

Publisher: University Press of New England

ISBN: 1611689384

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 922

Hugh Dowding may be described as the prime architect of British victory in the battle of Britain, and thus as one of a handful of officers and men most responsible for ensuring that Hitler's planned invasion of England never occurred. Dowding was born in 1882 at the apex of British imperial power and had an early career as a gunner on the fabled North-West Frontier of the British Indian Empire. During the first year of World War I, he served with distinction as a combat pilot in France, but his real test would come in 1936, when he was assigned the critical task of reorganizing the Air Defense of Great Britain as the first air officer commanding-in-chief of the new RAF Fighter Command. In that capacity he stood up to senior staff--and Winston Churchill--by preventing the dismantling of British air defenses during the Battle of France in the spring of 1940, defying pressure from the British Army, Britain's French allies, and His Majesty's Government to send the bulk of the RAF's front-line fighters to the Continent in what Dowding predicted would be a futile effort to stem the German onslaught. While holding back as many of his best fighter aircraft as he could, in June Dowding deployed 11 Group under his hand-picked lieutenant, Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, to repulse the Luftwaffe over Dunkirk, covering the evacuation of some 338,000 British and French troops from the Continent. During the three months of fighting known as the Battle of Britain, the integrated air defense system organized and trained by Dowding fought the vaunted Luftwaffe to a standstill in daylight air-to-air combat. In October, the Germans abandoned their attempt to win a decisive battle for air superiority over England, turning instead to the protracted campaign of attrition by nighttime area bombing known as the Blitz. In building, defending, and overseeing the operations of Fighter Command, Dowding was thus not only one of the master builders of air power, but also the only airman to have been the winning commander in one of history's decisive battles.

At Home and under Fire

This is a study of how British civilians experienced and came to terms with aerial warfare during the First and Second World Wars.

Author: Susan R. Grayzel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139502506

Category: History

Page:

View: 110

Although the Blitz has come to symbolize the experience of civilians under attack, Germany first launched air raids on Britain at the end of 1914 and continued them during the First World War. With the advent of air warfare, civilians far removed from traditional battle zones became a direct target of war rather than a group shielded from its impact. This is a study of how British civilians experienced and came to terms with aerial warfare during the First and Second World Wars. Memories of the World War I bombings shaped British responses to the various real and imagined war threats of the 1920s and 1930s, including the bombing of civilians during the Spanish Civil War and, ultimately, the Blitz itself. The processes by which different constituent bodies of the British nation responded to the arrival of air power reveal the particular role that gender played in defining civilian participation in modern war.

Bulletins from Britain

Importance of Russian Resistance If , as the leaders of Germany appear to hope ,
Russia is crippled during the coming winter , the whole weight of the German air
arm may be expected to be concentrated on the destruction of Britain from the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page:

View: 240