Those Damned Rebels

Books by Michael Pearson THE MILLIONAIRE MENTALITY THE SECRET INVADERS (with Bill Strutton) THE MILLION DOLLAR BUGS THOSE DAMNED REBELS: BRITAIN'S AMERICAN EMPIRE IN REVOLT Those Damned Rebels Britain's American Empire in Revolt MICHAEL ...

Author: Michael Pearson

Publisher: Heinemann Educational Books

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 470

View: 129

A re-creation of the American Revolution from the British point of view --and a dramatically different picture of the birth of our nation.

Britain s Informal Empire in Spain 1830 1950

Their underlying motive was the development of new markets to meet the growing demands of Britain's own industrial and commercial interests. Having largely sated domestic demand (and faced a series of severe trade crises in the 1820s), ...

Author: Nick Sharman

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030779505

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 605

Based on five years of archival research, this book offers a radical reinterpretation of Britain and Spain’s relationship during the growth, apogee and decline of the British Empire. It shows that from the early nineteenth century Britain turned Spain into an ‘informal’ colony, using its economic and military dominance to achieve its strategic and economic ends. Britain’s free trade campaign, which aimed to tear down the legal barriers to its explosive trade and investment expansion, undermined Spain’s attempts to achieve industrial take-off, demonstrating that the relationship between the two countries was imperial in nature, and not simply one of unequal national power. Exploring five key moments of crisis in their relations, from the First Carlist War in the 1830s to the Second World War, the author analyses Britain’s use of military force in achieving its goals, and the consequences that this had for economic and political policy-making in Spain. Ultimately, the Anglo-Spanish relationship was an early example of the interaction between industrial power and colonies, formal and informal, that characterised the post-World War Two period. An insightful read for anyone researching the British Empire and its colonies, this book offers an innovative perspective by closely examining the volatile relationship between two European powers.

Britain s Retreat from Empire in East Asia 1905 1980

... the centre of Britain's empire in the Middle East. Here, as in China, Lampson faced a rising tide of nationalism and anti-British agitation, and, as in China, he played a crucial part in securing British interests.

Author: Antony Best

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134517181

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 131

The decline of British power in Asia, from a high point in 1905, when Britain’s ally Japan vanquished the Russian Empire, apparently reducing the perceived threat that Russia posed to its influence in India and China, to the end of the twentieth century, when British power had dwindled to virtually nothing, is one of the most important themes in understanding the modern history of East and Southeast Asia. This book considers a range of issues that illustrate the significance and influence of the British Empire in Asia and the nature of Britain’s imperial decline. Subjects covered include the challenges posed by Germany and Japan during the First World War, British efforts at international co-operation in the interwar period, the British relationship with Korea and Japan in the wake of the Second World War, and the complicated path of decolonisation in Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.

Britain s Imperial Muse

Britain's Imperial Muse explores the classics' contribution to British imperialism and to the experience of empire in India through the long 19th century.

Author: C. Hagerman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113731642X

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 763

Britain's Imperial Muse explores the classics' contribution to British imperialism and to the experience of empire in India through the long 19th century. It reveals the classics role as a foundational source for positive conceptions of empire and a rhetorical arsenal used by commentators to justify conquest and domination, especially of India.

Britain s Empire

A magisterial history of resistance to the rising of the British empire As the call for a new understanding of our national history grows louder, Britain’s Empire turns the received imperial story on its head.

Author: Richard Gott

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 1839764228

Category: History

Page: 0

View: 906

A magisterial history of resistance to the rising of the British empire As the call for a new understanding of our national history grows louder, Britain’s Empire turns the received imperial story on its head. Richard Gott recounts the long-overlooked narrative of resisters, revolutionaries and revolters who stood up to the might of the Empire. In a story of almost continuous colonialist violence, Britain’s crimes unspool from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the Indian Mutiny, spanning the globe from Ireland to Australia. Capturing events from the perspective of the colonised, Gott unearths the all-but-forgotten stories excluded from mainstream histories.

Britain s Maritime Empire

Throughout the Atlantic world and across all European empires, old certainties were being questioned. ... shifting sands of imperial attachment and colonial sentiment could have an even bigger impact on the British Indian Ocean world.

Author: John McAleer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107100720

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 447

Analyses the critical role played by the maritime gateway to Asia around the Cape of Good Hope in the development of the British Empire. Focusing on a region that connected the Atlantic and Indian oceans at the centre of a vital maritime chain linking Europe with Asia, the book re-examines and reappraises Britain's oceanic empire.

British Culture and the End of Empire

This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery.

Author: Stuart Ward

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719060489

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 484

The demise of the British Empire in the three decades following the Second World War is a theme that has been well traversed in studies of post-war British politics, economics and foreign relations. Yet there has been strikingly little attention to the question of how these dramatic changes in Britain's relationships with the wider world were reflected in British culture. This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery. Far from being a matter of indifference or resigned acceptance as is often suggested, the fall of the British Empire came as a profound shock to the British national imagination, and resonated widely in British popular culture.

Britain s Experience of Empire in the Twentieth Century

Written by specialists from various fields, this edited volume is the first systematic investigation of the impact of imperialism on twentieth-century Britain.

Author: Andrew Thompson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191623571

Category: History

Page: 369

View: 428

Written by specialists from various fields, this edited volume is the first systematic investigation of the impact of imperialism on twentieth-century Britain. The contributors explore different aspects of Britain's imperial experience as the empire weathered the storms of the two world wars, was subsequently dismantled, and then apparently was gone. How widely was the empire's presence felt in British culture and society? What was the place of imperial questions in British party politics? Was Britain's status as a global power enhanced or underpinned by the existence of its empire? What was the relation of Britain's empire to national identities within the United Kingdom? The chapters range widely from social attitudes to empire and the place of the colonies in the public imagination, to the implications of imperialism for demography, trade, party politics and political culture, government and foreign policy, the churches and civil society, and the armed forces. The volume also addresses the fascinating yet complex question of how, after the formal end of empire, the colonial past has continued to impinge upon our post-colonial present, as contributors reflect upon the diverse ways in which the legacies of empire are interpreted and debated in Britain today.

Britain Palestine and Empire The Mandate Years

5 More recently, Caroline Elkins in her account of Britain's suppression of the 'Mau Mau' revolt in Kenya in the 1950s ... Britain's imperial image, and that image contrasted sharply with the brutal behavior of other European empires in ...

Author: Dr Rory Miller

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409481212

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 499

In 1948, Britain withdrew from Palestine, bringing to an end its 30 years of rule in the territory. What followed has been well-documented and is perhaps one of the most intractable problems of the post-imperial age. However, the long-standing connection between Britain and Palestine before May 1948 is also a fascinating story. This volume takes a fresh look at the years of the British mandate for Palestine; its politics, economics, and culture. Contributors address themes such as religion, mandatory administration, economic development, policy and counter-insurgency, violence, art and culture, and decolonization. This book will be valuable to scholars of the British mandate, but also more broadly to those interested in imperial history and the history of the West’s involvement in the Middle East.

The Origins of the British Empire in Asia 1600 1750

... not only evokes a traditional understanding of empire and Britain,s expansion across the world but is also typical of the supposed tabula rasa upon which European settlements and forts seemingly rose.6 Yet when this tidy little ...

Author: David Veevers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108752519

Category: History

Page:

View: 379

This is an important, revisionist account of the origins of the British Empire in Asia in the early modern period. David Veevers uncovers a hidden world of transcultural interactions between servants of the English East India Company and the Asian communities and states they came into contact with, revealing how it was this integration of Europeans into non-European economies, states and societies which was central to British imperial and commercial success rather than national or mercantilist enterprise. As their servants skilfully adapted to this rich and complex environment, the East India Company became enfranchised by the eighteenth century with a breadth of privileges and rights – from governing sprawling metropolises to trading customs-free. In emphasising the Asian genesis of the British Empire, this book sheds new light on the foreign frameworks of power which fuelled the expansion of Global Britain in the early modern world.