Democracy Culture and the Voice of Poetry

Robert Pinsky, however, argues that this gloomy diagnosis is as wrongheaded as it is familiar.

Author: Robert Pinsky

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400825156

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 112

View: 824

The place of poetry in modern democracy is no place, according to conventional wisdom. The poet, we hear, is a casualty of mass entertainment and prosaic public culture, banished to the artistic sidelines to compose variations on insipid themes for a dwindling audience. Robert Pinsky, however, argues that this gloomy diagnosis is as wrongheaded as it is familiar. Pinsky, whose remarkable career as a poet itself undermines the view, writes that to portray poetry and democracy as enemies is to radically misconstrue both. The voice of poetry, he shows, resonates with profound themes at the very heart of democratic culture. There is no one in America better to write on this topic. One of the country's most accomplished poets, Robert Pinsky served an unprecedented two terms as America's Poet Laureate (1997-2000) and led the immensely popular multimedia Favorite Poem Project, which invited Americans to submit and read aloud their favorite poems. Pinsky draws on his experiences and on characteristically sharp and elegant observations of individual poems to argue that expecting poetry to compete with show business is to mistake its greatest democratic strength--its intimate, human scale--as a weakness. As an expression of individual voice, a poem implicitly allies itself with ideas about individual dignity that are democracy's bedrock, far more than is mass participation. Yet poems also summon up communal life.. Even the most inward-looking work imagines a reader. And in their rhythms and cadences poems carry in their very bones the illusion and dynamic of call and response. Poetry, Pinsky writes, cannot help but mediate between the inner consciousness of the individual reader and the outer world of other people. As part of the entertainment industry, he concludes, poetry will always be small and overlooked. As an art--and one that is inescapably democratic--it is massive and fundamental.

Democracy in the Poetry of Walt Whitman

This informative edition explores Walt Whitman's poetry through the lens of democracy.

Author: Thomas Riggs

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 0737763787

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 208

View: 752

This informative edition explores Walt Whitman's poetry through the lens of democracy. Chapters include an examination of Whitman's life and influences, a look at key ideas related to democracy in Whitman's poetry, and a series of essays that explore topics such as Whitman's views of democratic comradeship, the role of bonds between men, Whitman's approach to patriotism, and Whitman's contradictory views on slavery and race. Readers are also presented with contemporary perspectives on democracy, such as the importance of an informed electorate and the impact of American individualism on contemporary politics.

Walt Whitman The Democratic Poet and His Prose on Democracy A Comparison of Whitman s Concept of the Poet s Role in Developing a National Identity in Preface 1855 Leaves of Grass and From Democratic Vistas 1871

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2, Free University of Berlin (John-F.-Kennedy Institut), 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: Double spaced, abstract: When the 52 ...

Author: Sonja Longolius

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638656209

Category:

Page: 36

View: 739

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2, Free University of Berlin (John-F.-Kennedy Institut), 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: Double spaced, abstract: When the 52-year-old Walt Whitman published his essay "From Democratic Vistas" in 1871, the end of the Civil War was only six years ago. The wounds of this five-year-war of brother against brother were certainly not healed and the question of re-unification was still un-answered. During the 1860s and 1870s the United States were changing tremendously. Due to the Civil War, the Reconstruction Era and the following Gilded Age, America was turning into a modern, industrialized country where materialism seemed to be the finite answer. Though Whitman fully acknowledged this materialistic development of his country, he nevertheless saw beyond the simple answers of wealth and prosperity. Whitman realized that the United States found themselves at a turning point, which was to decide upon their democratic future. At this point in time, Whitman wrote his essay "From Democratic Vistas" on the outlooks of America's future democracy. According to him, this future lied in a democratic nationality and a spiritual union that could only be achieved through a national literature. The call for a national literature led by the American poet was not something new in Whitman's written work. Already in his "Preface 1855 - Leaves of Grass," published six years before the beginning of the Civil War, he had formulated that America "with veins full of poetical stuff most need s] poets." Nevertheless, there is a noticeable difference between the general role of the poet in his 1855 preface and the urgent need of national literary figures in times of re-unification that Whitman put forth in his 1871 essay. While Whitman's poet in the 1855 preface obtained the role of an observer of the country and her common people, the poet's role in "From Democratic Vistas" chan

Democracy and Poetry

Even Whitman was beginning to find this out , for a few years later , in Democratic Vistas , he could ask if , in the victorious ... as late as 1868 , he could come to Washington to set up as a philosophic critic 9 Democracy and Poetry.

Author: Robert Penn Warren

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674196261

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 102

View: 773

The distinguished poet, novelist, and critic offers two personal meditations on the interrelationships among American democracy, conceptual and actual, the making of art, and the diminishing notion of selfhood crucial to both


Heart of Democracy

Problem of establishing Marxism in society also described in a poem in this book. Lives some important democratic leaders are included in this book.

Author: Ghazi Mokammel Hossain

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781495491733

Category: Poetry

Page: 80

View: 370

Problems of establishing parliamentary democracy, in the third world countries for absence of honesty, tolerance, patriotism & neutrality among the politicians is described in different poems in this book. Problem of establishing Marxism in society also described in a poem in this book. Lives some important democratic leaders are included in this book. Lives of some patriot freedom fighters for independence and their contribution are also included in this book. Problems of war against peace are also described in this book some poems are written on nature & beauty of nature. Khelafat is a system of government ran by rule of law in a stateless society to establish a state by the side of Mecca. Khelafat Rashidun continued for twenty seven years, during the reign of four Khelifs they are: i) Hazrat Abubakkar Sidque (R) ii) Hazrat Omar Bin Khattab (R) iii) Hazrat Osman Goni (R) iv) Hazrat Ali (R). Mobia started kingship (Dynasty) long live democracy, rule of law honesty, patriotism, tolerance and neutrality to meet people's dream of democracy. This book is also mirror of wrong politics of invisible autocratic rulers of the modern world in the name of democracy.

Democracy in Contemporary U S Women s Poetry

Samuel Lipman, “Redefining Culture and Democracy,” The New Criterion 8, no. 4 (1989), 18. Dana Gioia, “Notes on the New Formalism,” Conversant Essays: Poets in Conversation, edited by J. McCorkle (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, ...

Author: N. Marsh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230607152

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 502

This book reads the work of contemporary women poets against recent debates in third wave feminism and democratic theory in exploring the range of ways in which women poets have interrogated the complexities of being public in contemporary U.S culture.

Republic of Apples Democracy of Oranges

Sichuan poet Sun Wenbo writes: ... I feel so liberated I start writing about the republic of apples and democracy of oranges. When I see apples have not become tanks, oranges not bombs, I know I've not become a slave of words after all.

Author: Frank Stewart

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824882881

Category: Poetry

Page: 200

View: 120

Republic of Apples, Democracy of Oranges presents nearly 100 poets and translators from China and the U.S.—the two countries most responsible for global carbon dioxide emissions and the primary contributors to extreme climate change. These poetic voices express the altered relationship that now exists between the human and non-human worlds, a situation in which we witness everyday the ways environmental destruction is harming our emotions and imaginations. “What can poetry say about our place in the natural world today?” ecologically minded poets ask. “How do we express this new reality in art or sing about it in poetry?” And, as poet Forrest Gander wonders, “how might syntax, line break, or the shape of the poem on the page express an ecological ethics?” Eco-poetry freely searches for possible answers. Sichuan poet Sun Wenbo writes: ... I feel so liberated I start writing about the republic of apples and democracy of oranges. When I see apples have not become tanks, oranges not bombs, I know I've not become a slave of words after all. The Chinese poets are from throughout the PRC and Taiwan, both minority and majority writers, from big cities and rural provinces, such as Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture and Xinjiang Uyghur, Tibet, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions. The American poets are both emerging and established, from towns and cities across the U.S. Included are images by celebrated photographer Linda Butler documenting the Three Gorges Dam, on the Yangtze River, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, on the Mississippi River Basin.


Poets of the Democracy

In the pages of Mrs. Hamilton King's poem The Disciples, the same note is struck again and again, and we feel the ... In this sense of the term we have a great amount of democratic poetry in English, for the spirit of our people has ...

Author: George Currie Martin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English poetry

Page: 138

View: 181