Dubliners

This Norton Critical Edition is based on Hans Walter Gabler's scholarly edition and includes Gabler's edited text, his textual notes, and a newly revised version of his introduction, which details and discusses the complicated publication ...

Author: James Joyce

Publisher: Wordsworth Editions

ISBN: 9781853260483

Category: Fiction

Page: 170

View: 342

"Since its publication in 1914, Dubliners has been arguably the most famous collection of short stories written in English. Through what James Joyce described as their "style of scrupulous meanness," the stories collectively present a direct, sometimes searing view of the city of Dublin in the twentieth century. This Norton Critical Edition is based on Hans Walter Gabler's scholarly edition and includes Gabler's edited text, his textual notes, and a newly revised version of his introduction, which details and discusses the complicated publication history of Dubliners. Explanatory annotations are provided by the volume editor, Margot Norris." ""Contexts" is a rich collection of materials intended to bring Dubliners to life for twenty-first-century readers. The Irish capital of a century ago is captured through photographs, maps, songs, newspaper items, and advertising. Early versions of two of the stories and Joyce's satirical poem about his publication woes provide additional background." ""Criticism" includes eight interpretive essays that illuminate some of the stories most frequently taught and discussed -"Araby," "Eveline," "After the Race," "The Boarding House," "Counterparts," "A Painful Case," and "The Dead." The contributors are David G. Wright, Heyward Ehrlich, Margot Norris, James Fairhall, Fritz Senn, Morris Beja, Roberta Jackson, and Vincent J. Cheng. A Selected Bibliography is also included."--BOOK JACKET.

New Perspectives on Dubliners

Scholarly journals have devoted special issues to Dubliners Style , and The
James Joyce Quarterly in 1991 and Studies in Short Fiction , 1995. There have
been several new editions of Dubliners recently , most notably John Wyse
Jackson ...

Author: Mary Power

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789042003750

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 298

View: 119


Suspicious Readings of Joyce s Dubliners

Because the stories in James Joyce's Dubliners seem to function as models of fiction, they are able to stand in for fiction in general in their ability to make the operation of texts explicit and visible.

Author: Margot Norris

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812202988

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 812

Because the stories in James Joyce's Dubliners seem to function as models of fiction, they are able to stand in for fiction in general in their ability to make the operation of texts explicit and visible. Joyce's stories do this by provoking skepticism in the face of their storytelling. Their narrative unreliabilities—produced by strange gaps, omitted scenes, and misleading narrative prompts—arouse suspicion and oblige the reader to distrust how and why the story is told. As a result, one is prompted to look into what is concealed, omitted, or left unspoken, a quest that often produces interpretations in conflict with what the narrative surface suggests about characters and events. Margot Norris's strategy in her analysis of the stories in Dubliners is to refuse to take the narrative voice for granted and to assume that every authorial decision to include or exclude, or to represent in a particular way, may be read as motivated. Suspicious Readings of Joyce's Dubliners examines the text for counterindictions and draws on the social context of the writing in order to offer readings from diverse theoretical perspectives. Suspicious Readings of Joyce's Dubliners devotes a chapter to each of the fifteen stories in Dubliners and shows how each confronts the reader with an interpretive challenge and an intellectual adventure. Its readings of "An Encounter," "Two Gallants," "A Painful Case," "A Mother," "The Boarding House," and "Grace" reconceive the stories in wholly novel ways—ways that reveal Joyce's writing to be even more brilliant, more exciting, and more seriously attuned to moral and political issues than we had thought.

Dubliners by James Joyce MAXnotes

Not surprisingly, publishers backed away from his unblinking portrait of Dublin's
citizenry; it took Ioyce an exhausting nine years to see Dubliners published. “I
seriously believe," Joyce wrote to would-be publisher Grant Richards in 1905, “
that ...

Author:

Publisher: Research & Education Assoc.

ISBN: 9780738673226

Category: Study Aids

Page:

View: 670

MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions. MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work's historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each chapter is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers.

New Dubliners

The fertility rates of all the other classes are covered by a range of only 8 per cent
on either side of the mean.49 AN APPRAISAL OF THE NEW DUBLINERS Before
we try to draw any conclusions from the preceding data about the results of ...

Author: Alexander Jeremiah Humphreys

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415177016

Category: Social Science

Page: 295

View: 347

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Dubliners

Joyce’s first major work, written when he was only twenty-five, brought his city to the world for the first time.

Author: Joyce J.

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5521070966

Category: Fiction

Page: 255

View: 736

Joyce’s first major work, written when he was only twenty-five, brought his city to the world for the first time. His stories are rooted in the rich detail of Dublin life, portraying ordinary, often defeated lives with unflinching realism. He writes of social decline, sexual desire and exploitation, corruption and personal failure, yet creates a brilliantly compelling, unique vision of the world and of human experience.

Dubliners

By treating Dubliners as an expanding document of lives in the process of being lived and by paying attention to how the boundaries between stories break down, Benstock is able to notice how characters and situations come uncannily to ...

Author: Bernard Benstock

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252020582

Category: Dublin (Ireland)

Page: 171

View: 511

The harvest of a long and deep acquaintance with Joyce's fifteen enigmatic stories of Dublin life, Narrative Con/Texts in "Dubliners" creatively widens the definition of "context" to include networks of theme and symbol. By treating Dubliners as an expanding document of lives in the process of being lived and by paying attention to how the boundaries between stories break down, Benstock is able to notice how characters and situations come uncannily to resemble each other. There are several innovative approaches here (for example, the thorough inspection of the economic conditions of Joyce's Dublin, down to the halfpenny) as well as new twists on established ideas. Benstock attempts a global, integrated reading of the stories, substituting his more holistic "con/texts" for the current fashion of context-hunting. His is an old ambition (for full coverage) in a new, upbeat format.

Dubliners Illustrated

They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century.The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was ...

Author: James Joyce

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 260

View: 734

Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century.The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences.

Journey Westward

Journey Westward suggests that James Joyce was attracted to the west of Ireland as a place of authenticity and freedom.

Author: Frank Shovlin

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 1846318238

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 180

View: 778

Journey Westward suggests that James Joyce was attracted to the west of Ireland as a place of authenticity and freedom. It examines how this acute sensibility is reflected in Dubliners via a series of coded nods and winks, posing new and revealing questions about one of the most enduring and resonant collections of short stories ever written. The answers are a fusion of history and literary criticism, utilizing close readings that balance the techniques of realism and symbolism. The result is a startlingly original study that opens up fresh ways of thinking about Joyce's masterpieces.

Reading Dubliners Again

"The Detective and the Cowboy," "Wondering Where All the Dust Comes From," "Ejaculations and Silence," and "Where the Corkscrew Was"these are Garry Leonard's chapter titles for his readings of four of the stories, "An Encounter," "Eveline," ...

Author: Garry M. Leonard

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815626008

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 388

View: 726

"The Detective and the Cowboy," "Wondering Where All the Dust Comes From," "Ejaculations and Silence," and "Where the Corkscrew Was"these are Garry Leonard's chapter titles for his readings of four of the stories, "An Encounter," "Eveline," "The Boarding House," and "Clay." The titles convey the freshness and thoughtfulness that are indicative of all of Leonard's new readings of these fifteen often-read stories. Leonard begins with an excellent overview of Lacan and proceeds to examine each story in a separate chapter. Lacan's rethinking of human subjectivity plays throughout the book and ultimately unites it. Not only does Leonard's work preserve the complex interplay between Lacanian theory and Joyce's texts, but also completes another and no less significant project: the rescuing of Dubliners from the category of "easy Joyce." Throughout the readings the relevance of Lacan's ideas to feminist theory is emphasized in order to examine both what Lacan terms the "masquerade of femininity" and the equally illusory power structure of the "masculine subject." The frequent and jargon-free explications of Lacan's terms and theories, coupled with a close reading of each of the stories, makes this a book to be consulted by anyone wishing to explore new ways to approach Dubliners, new ways to read these rich stories again.

ReJoycing

"In this volume, the contributors -- a veritable Who's Who of Joyce specialists -- provide an excellent introduction to the central issues of contemporary Joyce criticism."

Author: Rosa Bollettieri Bosinelli

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081314907X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 836

"In this volume, the contributors -- a veritable Who's Who of Joyce specialists -- provide an excellent introduction to the central issues of contemporary Joyce criticism."

Joyce Annotated

Now this substantially revised and expanded edition of Don Gifford's Notes to Joyce: "Dubliners" and "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" puts the requisite knowledge at the disposal of scholars, students, and general readers.

Author: Don Gifford

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520046102

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 825

This substantially revised and expanded edition of Don Gifford's Notes to Joyce: Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man puts the requisite knowledge at the disposal of scholars, students, and general readers. Professor Gifford's labors in gathering these data into a single volume have resulted in an invaluable sourcebook.



Dubliners

Key Features: Study methods Introduction to the text Summaries with critical notes Themes and techniques Textual analysis of key passages Author biography Historical and literary background Modern and historical critical approaches ...

Author: John Brannigan

Publisher: York Notes Advanced

ISBN: 9780582329119

Category:

Page: 112

View: 481

Key Features: Study methods Introduction to the text Summaries with critical notes Themes and techniques Textual analysis of key passages Author biography Historical and literary background Modern and historical critical approaches Chronology Glossary of literary terms

Gender Roles and Sexual Morality in James Joyce s Dubliners

This second section is of great importance, because as already implied by the last quotation, this collection of fifteen short- stories, published in 1914, are expected to mirror the reality of the society of Dublin of that time, and to be ...

Author: Eleni Papadopoulou

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638883299

Category: Man-woman relationships

Page: 36

View: 902

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2-, 10 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: First of all, and before we proceed with the actual description and basic layout of the term paper, it would be quite interesting to cite an extract from a letter that James Joyce himself wrote to his lover and partner Nora Barnacle. "How could I like the idea of home? ... My mother was slowly killed, I think, by my father's ill-treatment, by years of trouble, and by my cynical frankness of conduct. When I looked on her face as she lay in the coffin - a face grey and wasted with cancer- I understood that I was looking on the face of a victim and I cursed the system which had made her a victim." (Letters, II, 48) 1 This quotation roused my interest and became my first motivation concerning the study of gender roles and sexual morality in ' Dubliners', as it summarizes the cruel reality of the position of women at that period of time. In addition to that, it provides us with a general impression of what the situation in Dublin might have been, focusing on the rather inharmonic relations between the two sexes.This small study and description of the gender roles in 'Dubliners' is organized in two main parts. As Joyce's intention was "to write a chapter of the moral history of my [his] country" (D, xxxi), it is essential that the first part provides us with the general historical background of that age. The historical part may conveniently be divided into two sections. The first concerns the roles of both sexes in the Victorian era, whereas the second section brings us closer to the reality of men and women in Ireland, and to be more specific in Dublin. This second section is of great importance, because as already implied by the last quotation, this collection of fifteen short- stories, published in 1914, are expected to mirror the reality of the society of Dublin of that time, and to be more specif

Engendered Trope in Joyce s Dubliners

In its theoretical framework, this study is Lacanian not by following Lacan as the traditional psychoanalytic critic would follow Freud or Jung as the master explicator of the literary text but by doing Lacan.

Author: Earl G. Ingersoll

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809320165

Category: Social Science

Page: 193

View: 583

Earl G. Ingersoll convincingly argues that his study is a "return to Lacan," just as Lacan himself believed his own work to be a "return to Freud." In this study of trope and gender in Dubliners, Ingersoll follows Lacan’s example by returning to explore more fully the usefulness of the earlier Lacanian insights stressing the importance of language. Returning to the semiotic—as opposed to the more traditional psychoanalytic—Lacan, Ingersoll opts for the Lacan who follows Roman Jakobson back to early Freud texts in which Freud happened upon the major structuring principles of similarity and displacement. Jakobson interprets these principles as metaphor and metonymy; Lacan employs these two tropes as the means of representing transformation and desire. Thus, psychic functions meet literary texts in the space of linguistic representation through the signifier: metaphor is a signifier for a repressed signified, while metonymy is a signifier that displaces another. Rejecting traditional psychoanalytic readings of Dubliners, Ingersoll’s New Psychoanalytic Criticism embraces Shoshana Felman’s view that psychoanalysis is not a body of truths to be applied to literature but rather a literature in itself to be read intertextually with what we more conventionally consider literary texts. In its theoretical framework, this study is Lacanian not by following Lacan as the traditional psychoanalytic critic would follow Freud or Jung as the master explicator of the literary text but by doing Lacan. Ingersoll credits Lacan not as the scientist Freud tried and failed to become but as the poet Freud was, especially in his earlier period. Basing his idea of the connections between gender and the tropes in the writings of feminist theorists and critics such as Luce Irigaray, Jane Gallop, and Barbara Johnson, Ingersoll argues that sex and gender are not necessarily linked. In Dublin, the capital of a patriarchal society, Joyce reveals the relevance of the opposition between metaphor/motion/empowerment as the "masculine" and metonymy/confinement/vulnerability as the "feminine." In this context, metaphor must be privileged over metonymy as "masculinity" is privileged over "femininity"— not because what is is right but because Joyce is describing a world that readers have always recognized as morally and spiritually deficient.

James Joyce Dubliners Eveline s state of paralysis with special regard to her different roles she has to play as a woman

2.1 The term “polrdlysis” Paralysis is word that is often connected to James
Joyce's novel Dubliners. Consequently it is also a term which plays a major role
in the short story Eveline. But what does paralysis exactly mean? “Loss or
impairment ...

Author: Florian Wenz

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3656177813

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 9

View: 698

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, University of Bamberg (Lehrstuhl für Anglistik), language: English, abstract: In the following text I would like to give an approach to the paralysis of the main character in James Joyce’s short story Eveline. In doing so, I will take a look at the origin and the consequences of her paralysis and the different roles she has to play as a woman. In addition I’m going to examine the relationships that she has to the people in her closer environment i. e. her father and her “lover” Frank.

Dubliners

This book is a personal invitation to readers to engage in friendly conversation with some of Dublin's most distinguished citizens.

Author: Audrey Healy

Publisher: Columba Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 139

View: 188

This book is a personal invitation to readers to engage in friendly conversation with some of Dublin's most distinguished citizens. It captures just a little of that rare and extraordinary sense of belonging that endears Dublin to its people and goes

Famous Dubliners

INTRODUCTION Anybody writing a book containing biographies of a selected
number of famous Dubliners has to make a decision at an early stage as to who
to include and who to exclude , due to the large number of Dubliners who have ...

Author: Michael Stanley

Publisher: Irish Amer Book Company

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 275

View: 949

This work contains excerpts from diaries, letters and writings by some of Dublin's most famous names. It features Yeats: his unrequited love for Maud Gonne and her daughter Iseult; his poetry; his intense interest in the supernatural and membership of the Order of the Golden Dawn; his family - especially his painter father and brother; Joyce: Nora; the family of Giorgio and Lucia - with her schizophrenia and infatuation with Beckett; Joyce's literary friends - Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound; reactions to his work; Swift: his fatherless childhood and absent mother; the women in his life - Stella whom he met when she was eight and their suspected marriage; Vanessa who spurned him and was in turn spurned; Swift's infamous illnesses; as dean of St Patrick's Cathedral; his legacy of St Patrick's Hospital; his satires including Gulliver's Travels.