Fighting to the End

What explains Pakistan's persistent revisionism despite increasing costs and decreasing likelihood of success? This book argues that an understanding of the army's strategic culture explains its willingness to fight to the end

Author: C. Christine Fair

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199892709

Category: Political Science

Page: 347

View: 697

The Pakistan army is poised for perpetual conflict with India which it cannot win militarily or politically. What explains Pakistan's persistent revisionism despite increasing costs and decreasing likelihood of success? This book argues that an understanding of the army's strategic culture explains its willingness to fight to the end.

Fighting to the End

What explains Pakistan's persistent revisionism despite increasing costs and decreasing likelihood of success? This book argues that an understanding of the army's strategic culture explains its willingness to fight to the end.

Author: C. Christine Fair

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780199372249

Category: Islam and state

Page: 347

View: 220

The Pakistan Army is poised for perpetual conflict with India which it cannot win militarily or politically. What explains Pakistan's persistent revisionism despite increasing costs and decreasing likelihood of success? This book argues that an understanding of the army's strategic culture explains its willingness to fight to the end.

In Their Own Words

This path-breaking volume reveals a little-known aspect of how Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, a jihadist terrorist group, functions in Pakistan and beyond by translating and commenting upon a range of publications produced and disseminated by Dar-ul ...

Author: C. Christine Fair

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190062037

Category: Political Science

Page: 307

View: 457

This path-breaking volume reveals a little-known aspect of how Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, a jihadist terrorist group, functions in Pakistan and beyond by translating and commenting upon a range of publications produced and disseminated by Dar-ul-Andlus, the publishing wing of LeT. Only a fraction of LeT's cadres ever see battle: most of them are despatched on nation-wide "prozelytising" (dawa) missions to convert Pakistanis to their particular interpretation of Islam, in support of which LeT has developed a sophisticated propagandist literature. This canon of Islamist texts is the most popular and potent weapon in LeT's arsenal, and its scrutiny affords insights into how and who the group recruits; LeT's justification for jihad; its vision of itself in global and regional politics; the enemies LeT identifies and the allies it cultivates; and how and where it conducts its operations. Particular attention is paid to the role that LeT assigns to women by examining those writings which heap extravagant praise upon the mothers of aspirant jihadis, who bless their operations and martyrdom. It is only by understanding LeT's domestic functions as set out in these texts that one can begin to appreciate why Pakistan so fiercely supports it, despite mounting international pressure to disband the group.

Fighting to the End

The Pakistan Army's Way of War C. Christine Fair. Having read decades ofthe military's professional publications and accounts of senior officers, I conclude that the army's strategic culture shapes the way the Pakistan Army understands ...

Author: C. Christine Fair

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199892717

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 279

Since Pakistan was founded in 1947, its army has dominated the state. The military establishment has locked the country in an enduring rivalry with India, with the primary aim of wresting Kashmir from it. To that end, Pakistan initiated three wars over Kashmir-in 1947, 1965, and 1999-and failed to win any of them. Today, the army continues to prosecute this dangerous policy by employing non-state actors under the security of its ever-expanding nuclear umbrella. It has sustained a proxy war in Kashmir since 1989 using Islamist militants, as well as supporting non-Islamist insurgencies throughout India and a country-wide Islamist terror campaign that have brought the two countries to the brink of war on several occasions. In addition to these territorial revisionist goals, the Pakistani army has committed itself to resisting India's slow but inevitable rise on the global stage. Despite Pakistan's efforts to coerce India, it has achieved only modest successes at best. Even though India vivisected Pakistan in 1971, Pakistan continues to see itself as India's equal and demands the world do the same. The dangerous methods that the army uses to enforce this self-perception have brought international opprobrium upon Pakistan and its army. And in recent years, their erstwhile proxies have turned their guns on the Pakistani state itself. Why does the army persist in pursuing these revisionist policies that have come to imperil the very viability of the state itself, from which the army feeds? In Fighting to the End, C. Christine Fair argues that the answer lies, at least partially, in the strategic culture of the army. Through an unprecedented analysis of decades' worth of the army's own defense publications, she concludes that from the army's distorted view of history, it is victorious as long as it can resist India's purported drive for regional hegemony as well as the territorial status quo. Simply put, acquiescence means defeat. Fighting to the End convincingly shows that because the army is unlikely to abandon these preferences, Pakistan will remain a destabilizing force in world politics for the foreseeable future.

In Their Own Words

Plan of the Book In many ways, this book is a sequel to my earlier work Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War,84 in which I argued that Pakistan is a revisionist state in Kashmir and seeks to resist India's rise in the ...

Author: C. Christine Fair

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190062045

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 821

This path-breaking volume reveals a little-known aspect of how Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, a jihadist terrorist group, functions in Pakistan and beyond by translating and commenting upon a range of publications produced and disseminated by Dar-ul-Andlus, the publishing wing of LeT. Only a fraction of LeT's cadres ever see battle: most of them are despatched on nation-wide "prozelytising" (dawa) missions to convert Pakistanis to their particular interpretation of Islam, in support of which LeT has developed a sophisticated propagandist literature. This canon of Islamist texts is the most popular and potent weapon in LeT's arsenal, and its scrutiny affords insights into how and who the group recruits; LeT's justification for jihad; its vision of itself in global and regional politics; the enemies LeT identifies and the allies it cultivates; and how and where it conducts its operations. Particular attention is paid to the role that LeT assigns to women by examining those writings which heap extravagant praise upon the mothers of aspirant jihadis, who bless their operations and martyrdom. It is only by understanding LeT's domestic functions as set out in these texts that one can begin to appreciate why Pakistan so fiercely supports it, despite mounting international pressure to disband the group.

Pakistan s Democratic Transition

See Aqil Shah, The Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014); C. Christine Fair, Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014); Bruce ...

Author: Ishtiaq Ahmad

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317235940

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 408

Politics in Pakistan has traditionally been understood in the context of civil-military relationship. In May 2013, for the first time in history, Pakistan saw an elected government complete a full term in office and transfer power through the ballot box to another civilian government. In view of such an important development, this book offers critical perspectives on Pakistan’s current democratic transition and its implications for national politics, security and foreign policy. It critically analyses the emerging political trends in the country, including their underlying sources, attributes, constraints, and prospects of sustainability. Drawing on history, diverse theoretical perspectives, and empirical evidence, it explains the dynamics of the democratic process, contested borders and spaces, and regionalism. Contributions are from 13 prominent scholars in the field, who provide a wide-ranging analysis of Pakistan’s contemporary national and regional challenges, as well as the opportunities they entail for its viability as a democratic state. Taking the debate on Pakistan beyond the outmoded notions of praetorian politics and security, the book explores the future prospects of civilian supremacy in the country. It will be of interest to students and scholars of South Asian Politics, Political Sociology and Security Studies, as well as policy-makers, diplomats, security experts and military professionals.

The Routledge History of Global War and Society

Bhakari, S.K. Indian Warfare: An Appraisal of Strategy and Tactics of War in Early Medieval Period. ... A History of the Pakistan Army: Wars and Insurrections. ... Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War.

Author: Matthew S. Muehlbauer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317533186

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 616

The Routledge History of Global War and Society offers a sweeping introduction to the most significant research on the causes, experiences, and impacts of war throughout history. This collection of twenty-seven essays by leading historians demonstrates how war and society studies have dramatically expanded the chronological, geographic, and thematic breadth of the field of military history. Each chapter addresses the ways in which recent scholarship has integrated cultural, ethical, environmental, medical, and ideological factors to explain both conventional conflicts and genocide, terrorism, and other forms of mass violence. The broad scope of the collection makes it the perfect primer for scholars and students seeking to understand the complex interactions of warfare and those affecting and affected by conflict.

Routledge Handbook on South Asian Foreign Policy

Fair, C. C. (2014) Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War (New Delhi: Oxford University Press). French, R. W. (2016) “Deterrence Adrift? Mapping Conflict and Escalation in South Asia,” Strategic Studies Quarterly 10:1.

Author: Aparna Pande

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429619960

Category: Social Science

Page: 452

View: 157

This handbook offers a comprehensive overview of South Asian foreign policy, examining the complex history and present state of South Asian foreign policy, the foreign policy of the countries of the region, as well as their relationships with their neighbors and key external players, such as China and the United States, in an effort to understand South Asia’s place in the world order. It illustrates the future trajectory of foreign policy in the region and analyses future of regional arrangements like SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) and BIMSTEC. The handbook is structured in five parts, each representing a focused area of enquiry: Foreign Policy Relations within South Asia Relations within Indo-Pacific Relations with China, Europe and the United States Security A carefully selected collection of 26 chapters written by experts on South Asian foreign, economic, and security policy, this handbook provides an objective yet accessible overview of the history and current state of foreign policy of each country and the region. It is an authoritative reference work for academics and students as well as international think tanks, research institutes, and non-governmental organizations working on South Asian Politics, Asian Politics, Foreign Politics, International Affairs, World History, and International Relations.

The India Pakistan Sub conventional War

Ghost wars: The secret history of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet invasion to September 10, 2001. Penguin. Cox, R. W. (1986). ... Fighting to the end: The Pakistan army's way of war. Oxford University Press.

Author: Sanjeev Kumar H. M.

Publisher: SAGE Publishing India

ISBN: 9354794211

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 446

The India–Pakistan Sub-conventional War: Democracy and Peace in South Asia argues that it is possible to map the functioning of democracy in South Asia by studying the role of the army in the political processes of Pakistan. In December 1988, Pakistan experienced a transition to democracy. Simultaneously, the military–intelligence complex was also able to take advantage of insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir and intensify the proxy war against India. Considering such a contradictory political situation, this book studies the deepening conflictual trajectory of the India–Pakistan relations since 1989. By analyzing this period of history, it argues that, in South Asia, the process of democratic transition and intensification of the sub-conventional war have happened concurrently. The book further argues that overt nuclear weaponization and the failure of nuclear deterrence allowed the sustenance of the India–Pakistan sub-conventional war. By examining the subcontinental security predicament involving the two nuclear-powered adversaries, the book interrogates the democratic peace thesis. It deconstructs the thesis’ arguments in the geo-strategic context of the South Asian regional security architecture.

Many Rivers One Sea

C. Christine Fair, Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army's Way of War, New York: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 27. Ibid., p. 226. Stephen Tankel, Storming the World Stage: The Story of Lashkar-e-Taiba, London: Hurst & Co., 2011, p.

Author: Joseph Allchin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1787382702

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 674

A perennial frontier for Islamic orthodoxy, Bangladesh is witnessing an alarming rise in Islamist-inspired assassinations and terrorist attacks. In July 2016, the world's attention fell upon a café in a leafy Dhaka neighborhood as the barbarity of a distant 'Caliphate' was visited on this corner of South Asia. Twenty-nine died in the assault on the Holey Bakery, affixing an unbidden nightmare to the image of a supposedly tolerant Muslim nation. Joseph Allchin probes Bangladesh's recent and distant past as he investigates how it has become the latest front in world extremism. Delving into the local and global differences between political actors, he exposes the determining influence still exercised on most allegiances by the long aftermath of the country's independence struggle, and scrutinizes the careers of two long-term rivals: current prime minister Sheikh Hasina, and Khaleda Zia, who held the office in 1991-6 and 2001-6. This unerring investigation examines the relationship between radical Islam and the Bangladeshi political class, exposing the forces driving the conditions for extremism that bedevil the country's present and future.