Flatland

In a two-dimensional universe populated by a hierarchical society of geometric figures, a square is persecuted for attempting to reveal its new knowledge of a third dimension, learned from encounters with a sphere.

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fourth dimension

Page: 155

View: 621

In a two-dimensional universe populated by a hierarchical society of geometric figures, a square is persecuted for attempting to reveal its new knowledge of a third dimension, learned from encounters with a sphere.

Flatland

Part geometry lesson, part social satire, this classic work of science fiction brilliantly succeeds in enlarging all readers' imaginations beyond the limits of their "respective dimensional prejudices.

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781979111218

Category:

Page: 80

View: 367

How would a creature limited to two dimensions be able to grasp the possibility of a third? Edwin A. Abbott's droll and delightful "romance of many dimensions" explores this conundrum in the experiences of his protagonist, A Square, whose linear world is invaded by an emissary Sphere bringing the gospel of the third dimension. Part geometry lesson, part social satire, this classic work of science fiction brilliantly succeeds in enlarging all readers' imaginations beyond the limits of their "respective dimensional prejudices." Unless you're a mathematician, the chances of you reading any novels about geometry are probably slender. But if you read only one in your life, this should be at the top of your list. Flatland imagines a two-dimensional world inhabited by sentient geometric shapes who think their planar world is all there is. But one Flatlander, a Square, discovers the existence of a third dimension and the limits of his world's assumptions about reality and comes to understand the confusing problem of higher dimensions.


Flatland

Square leaves two-dimensional Flatland to visit one-dimensional Lineland and Sphere's home, the three-dimensional Spaceland.

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dimentions

Page: 100

View: 231

Square is a mild-mannered inhabitant of Flatland who is conventional in every way until he is visited by an other-worldly creature: a Sphere. Square leaves two-dimensional Flatland to visit one-dimensional Lineland and Sphere's home, the three-dimensional Spaceland. Edwin Abbott Abbott's novella is both a satire of the rigid social structures of Victorian England and a mind-bending look at the mathematical possibilities of the world around us. For this second reason, Abbott's charming thought experiment is much loved by students and teachers of mathematics, physics and computer science.

Flatland

Author: Edwin A. Abbott

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191604801

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 537

'Upward, yet not Northward.' How would a creature limited to two dimensions be able to grasp the possibility of a third? Edwin A. Abbott's droll and delightful 'romance of many dimensions' explores this conundrum in the experiences of his protagonist, A Square, whose linear world is invaded by an emissary Sphere bringing the gospel of the third dimension on the eve of the new millennium. Part geometry lesson, part social satire, this classic work of science fiction brilliantly succeeds in enlarging all readers' imaginations beyond the limits of our 'respective dimensional prejudices'. In a world where class is determined by how many sides you possess, and women are straight lines, the prospects for enlightenment are boundless, and Abbott's hypotheses about a fourth and higher dimensions seem startlingly relevant today. This new edition of Flatland illuminates the social and intellectual context that produced the work as well as the timeless questions that it raises about the limits of our perception and knowledge. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Flatland

Selected Editions of Flatland Flatland. A Romance of Many Dimensions. By A
Square [i.e., E. A. Abbott]. London: Seeley, 1884. Flatland: A Romance of Many
Dimensions. New and rev. ed. London: Seeley, 1884. Flatland: A Romance of
Many ...

Author: Edwin Abbott

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781770481299

Category: Fiction

Page: 252

View: 777

Flatland (1884) is an influential mathematical fantasy that simultaneously provides an introduction to non-Euclidean geometry and a satire on the Victorian class structure, issues of science and faith, and the role of women. A classic of early science fiction, the novel takes place in a world of two dimensions where all the characters are geometric shapes. The narrator, A Square, is a naïve, respectable citizen who is faced with proof of the existence of three dimensions when he is visited by a sphere and is forced to see the limitations of his world. The introduction to this Broadview Edition provides context for the book’s references to Victorian culture and religion, mathematical history, and the history of philosophy. The appendices contain contemporary reviews; extracts from the work of fellow mathematical fantasy writer/mathematician Charles Hinton; Hermann von Helmboltz’s “The Axioms of Geometry” (1870); and autobiographical passages from Abbott’s The Kernel and the Husk (1886).


Flatland

“Permit me to ask you to feel and be felt by my friend Mr. So-and-so”—is still,
among the more old-fashioned of our country gentlemen in districts remote from
towns, the customary formula for a Flatland introduction. But in the towns, and
among ...

Author: David Phelps Abbott

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465523243

Category: Fiction

Page: 102

View: 716

I call our world Flatland, not because we call it so, but to make its nature clearer to you, my happy readers, who are privileged to live in Space. Imagine a vast sheet of paper on which straight Lines, Triangles, Squares, Pentagons, Hexagons, and other figures, instead of remaining fixed in their places, move freely about, on or in the surface, but without the power of rising above or sinking below it, very much like shadows—only hard and with luminous edges—and you will then have a pretty correct notion of my country and countrymen. Alas, a few years ago, I should have said “my universe”: but now my mind has been opened to higher views of things. In such a country, you will perceive at once that it is impossible that there should be anything of what you call a “solid” kind; but I dare say you will suppose that we could at least distinguish by sight the Triangles Squares and other figures moving about as I have described them. On the contrary, we could see nothing of the kind, not at least so as to distinguish one figure from another. Nothing was visible, nor could be visible, to us, except straight Lines; and the necessity of this I will speedily demonstrate. Place a penny on the middle of one of your tables in Space; and leaning over it, look down upon it. It will appear a circle. But now, drawing back to the edge of the table, gradually lower your eye (thus bringing yourself more and more into the condition of the inhabitants of Flatland), and you will find the penny becoming more and more oval to your view; and at last when you have placed your eye exactly on the edge of the table (so that you are, as it were, actually a Flatland citizen) the penny will then have ceased to appear oval at all, and will have become, so far as you can see, a straight line. The same thing would happen if you were to treat in the same way a Triangle, or Square, or any other figure cut out of pasteboard. As soon as you look at it with your eye on the edge of the table, you will find that it ceases to appear to you a figure, and that it becomes in appearance a straight line. Take for example an equilateral Triangle—who represents with us a Tradesman of the respectable class. Fig. 1 represents the Tradesman as you would see him while you were bending over him from above; figs. 2 and 3 represent the Tradesman, as you would see him if your eye were close to the level, or all but on the level of the table; and if your eye were quite on the level of the table (and that is how we see him in Flatland) you would see nothing but a straight line.

Flatland

If anyone thought of going to the movie in Flatland, the large pink rose would
crowd their brain in a strange association game so that no title to any movie could
be referred to in town without “and the Rose” being tacked on the end: “Gone
With ...

Author: R. Yarbrough

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595476120

Category: Fiction

Page: 188

View: 990

Bip's mother told him to stay away from Lilith, a local black "witch" who also provides the dry county with alcohol. That mystery is all Bip needs as impetus to seek her out. Set in a small, West Texas town, racial differences, a murder, and rites of passage thread Bip through the rough skin of the community. Richly comic and laugh out loud funny, the characters of the community stumble through racial incongruities that have slept too long to discern the fact that we are all human-whether we act that way or not.


Flatland a Romance of Many Dimensions Illustrated

Written pseudonymously by "A Square",[1] the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions.

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 131

View: 950

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novella by the English schoolmaster Edwin Abbott Abbott, first published in 1884 by Seeley & Co. of London. Written pseudonymously by "A Square",[1] the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions.

Flatland

With the use of a geometric theme, Abbott weaves the fascinating tale of "A Square", an inhabitant of "Flatland", a two-dimensional world where women are portrayed as simple line-segments and men are represented as polygons whose social ...

Author: Beyond Words Press

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 86

View: 527

First published in 1884, "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" is English schoolmaster Edwin Abbott's classic work of science fiction. With the use of a geometric theme, Abbott weaves the fascinating tale of "A Square", an inhabitant of "Flatland", a two-dimensional world where women are portrayed as simple line-segments and men are represented as polygons whose social status is determined by the number and regularity of their sides. Through this device Abbott satirizes the seemingly arbitrary hierarchy of the Victorian era. In addition to a brilliant work of satire "Flatland" is a thought-provoking examination of the bounds of physical space. On the eve of the third millennium "A Square" dreams of a one-dimensional world, "Lineland", that is inhabited by "lustrous points". Subsequently he is visited by "A Sphere", an inhabitant of a three-dimensional world called "Spaceland", which he fails to comprehend until he sees it for himself. Having his mind opened to the existence of other dimensions "A Square" posits the theoretical possibility of the existence of four, five, and six dimensional worlds, an idea which gets him thrown out of "Spaceland" in disgrace. One of the most original pieces of literature ever written, "Flatland" is a witty and satirical adventure that explores the very nature of physical reality itself.

Flatland

Some nights are calm, quiet and tranquil and other nights are cold, loud and threatening. When I began this series, the landscape was flat, repetitive and unmythical.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Landscapes

Page: 28

View: 444

"The Texas nightscape reflects a moment in time where fear is contained by aesthetics. In exploring the landscape at night, eyesight is compromised; sounds become audibly stronger and smells are more priment. Some nights are calm, quiet and tranquil and other nights are cold, loud and threatening. When I began this series, the landscape was flat, repetitive and unmythical. I decided to remove and manipulate the landscape to fit a different perspective. I imagine the land with luscious green pine trees and snowy mountains reaching beyond the horizon in one region; and tall cacti, tumbleweeds and sand dunes in a dusty dry desert in another. In regards to the spirituality of these images, the merging of opposite terrains is a symbol of the themes I experienced while photographing across Texas; the sense of belonging, facing fear in the landscape and challenging ideas of reality."--page 1.

Flatland

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process.

Author: Abbott Edwin Abbott

Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC

ISBN: 9781110744817

Category: History

Page: 110

View: 394

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Flatland A Romance of Many Dimensions Illustrated Edition

The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides.

Author: Edwin A. Abbott

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8026893379

Category: Fiction

Page: 113

View: 266

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novel. Written pseudonymously by "A Square", the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. The narrator is a square named A Square, a member of the caste of gentlemen and professionals, who guides the readers through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. Flatland has often been categorized as science fiction although it could more precisely be called "mathematical fiction". With the advent of modern science fiction from the 1950s to the present day, Flatland has seen a revival in popularity, especially among science fiction and cyberpunk fans. Many works have been inspired by the novella, including novel sequels and short films.

Flatland and Einstein s Universe On Our Relationship to the Temporal Dimension

This is what some types of religion and philosophy have been trying to do for millenia and what science is attempting today. (First presented at Tetsugakkai, Bukkyo Daigaku, Kyoto, 1991/2/6)

Author: Wolfgang Ruttkowski

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638798984

Category:

Page: 36

View: 317

Scholarly Essay from the year 1991 in the subject Philosophy - Practical (Ethics, Aesthetics, Culture, Nature, Right, ...), grade: keine, Kyoto Sangyo University (German Department), language: English, comment: In Acta Humanistica XX/2 (Kyoto, March 1991)., abstract: Einstein's universe is needed to explain many observations of space science. In the same way, Flatland can only be fully understood from the perspective of Spaceland; Lineland can only be explained from the perspective of Flatland, etc. The inhabitants of each of these "dimensional worlds" cannot physically transcend their own world and, therefore, cannot visualize the next higher world. However, if they want to explain their own world, they need to do this from the perspective of the next higher one. This is what some types of religion and philosophy have been trying to do for millenia and what science is attempting today. (First presented at Tetsugakkai, Bukkyo Daigaku, Kyoto, 1991/2/6)

Flatland a Romance of Many Dimensions Annotated Relativity Physics Book

More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the ...

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 107

View: 359

Edwin Abbott Abbott (December 20, 1838 - October 12, 1926), English schoolmaster and theologian, is best known as the author of the mathematical satire and religious allegory Flatland (1884). Abbott was the eldest son of Edwin Abbott (1808-1882), headmaster of the Philological School, Marylebone, and his wife, Jane Abbott (1806-1882). His parents were first cousins. He was educated at the City of London School and at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in classics, mathematics and theology, and became fellow of his college. In 1862 he took orders. After holding masterships at King Edward's School, Birmingham, and at Clifton College, he succeeded G. F. Mortimer as headmaster of the City of London School in 1865 at the early age of twenty-six. He was Hulsean lecturer in 1876. He retired in 1889, and devoted himself to literary and theological pursuits. Dr. Abbott's liberal inclinations in theology were prominent both in his educational views and in his books. His Shakespearian Grammar (1870) is a permanent contribution to English philology. In 1885 he published a life of Francis Bacon. His theological writings include three anonymously published religious romances - Philochristus (1878), Onesimus (1882), and Sitanus (1906). More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world. He also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine Vocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906). Flatland was published in 1884.

Flatland

FLATLAND The sun shone hot inside the cabin , its glare horizontal from the west
. Below , wind kicked ground blizzards across the white land . It was May , and
the air strip shone like a glazed dash of electrician's tape against the otherwise ...

Author: David Richard Masiel

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 1026

View: 427


Flatland a Romance of Many Dimensions Annotated Humor and Entertainment

More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the ...

Author: Edwin Abbott Abbott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 107

View: 747

Edwin Abbott Abbott (December 20, 1838 - October 12, 1926), English schoolmaster and theologian, is best known as the author of the mathematical satire and religious allegory Flatland (1884). Abbott was the eldest son of Edwin Abbott (1808-1882), headmaster of the Philological School, Marylebone, and his wife, Jane Abbott (1806-1882). His parents were first cousins. He was educated at the City of London School and at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in classics, mathematics and theology, and became fellow of his college. In 1862 he took orders. After holding masterships at King Edward's School, Birmingham, and at Clifton College, he succeeded G. F. Mortimer as headmaster of the City of London School in 1865 at the early age of twenty-six. He was Hulsean lecturer in 1876. He retired in 1889, and devoted himself to literary and theological pursuits. Dr. Abbott's liberal inclinations in theology were prominent both in his educational views and in his books. His Shakespearian Grammar (1870) is a permanent contribution to English philology. In 1885 he published a life of Francis Bacon. His theological writings include three anonymously published religious romances - Philochristus (1878), Onesimus (1882), and Sitanus (1906). More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world. He also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine Vocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906). Flatland was published in 1884.

FLATLAND Illustrated

This eBook edition of "Flatland" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices.

Author: Edwin A. Abbott

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8027244749

Category: Fiction

Page: 113

View: 845

This eBook edition of "Flatland" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a satirical novel. Written pseudonymously by "A Square", the book used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian culture, but the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions. The story describes a two-dimensional world occupied by geometric figures, whereof women are simple line-segments, while men are polygons with various numbers of sides. The narrator is a square named A Square, a member of the caste of gentlemen and professionals, who guides the readers through some of the implications of life in two dimensions. Flatland has often been categorized as science fiction although it could more precisely be called "mathematical fiction". With the advent of modern science fiction from the 1950s to the present day, Flatland has seen a revival in popularity, especially among science fiction and cyberpunk fans. Many works have been inspired by the novella, including novel sequels and short films.