The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal

To the rarer reader who has come upon traces of an undying tradition--a Hidden Church or Wisdom--the book will be a very revelation.

Author: Arthur Edward Waite

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 713

View: 842

The reader who would reach to motives and inspirations, who would seek to understand the subtle and secret forces that have moved all history, it would be difiicult to name a work of greater interest or value than this. To the rarer reader who has come upon traces of an undying tradition--a Hidden Church or Wisdom--the book will be a very revelation. The Graal legend, even as it is known to the general reader, woven into the Arthurian epic, is one of rarest beauty and most profound meaning. But when its rich symbolism is revealed in full, the signicance of the great quest, in the which pure-miuded and self-sacricing valor is alone successful---the 'magnitude of meaning is made evident. Perhaps no other man living is so well fitted as Mr. Waite to approach this subject. Under the ruder methods of materialistic critics the delicate beauty and subtle meanings would be lost. Our author combines the grasp of scholarship with the sympathetic attitude and the deep-lying knowledge of hidden things.


The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal

Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

Author: Arthur Edward Waite

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781548796891

Category:

Page: 734

View: 928

The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal : Its Legends and Symbolism Considered in Their Affinity with Certain Mysteries of Initiation and Other Traces of a Secret Tradition in Christian Times by Arthur Edward Waite, first published in 1909, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation. Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

Bulletin

1909. .... W 3685 Von Hügel , Friedrich , baron . The mystical element of religion . 2 v . 1909. ... W 7294 Waite , A. E : The hidden church of the Holy Graal . 1909 .. W 19859 Walker , Williston . Great men of the Christian church .

Author:

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Category: Classified catalogs

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View: 333


Bulletin

W 3685 Von Hügel , Friedrich , baron . The mystical element of religion . 2 v . 1909 .... W 7294 Waite , A. E : The hidden church of the Holy Graal . 1909 ...... .W 19859 Walker , Williston . Great men of the Christian church . 1908 .

Author: Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore City

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Libraries

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View: 832


The New Arthurian Encyclopedia

... argues in The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal (1909) andinThe Holy Grail: ItsLegends and Symbolism (1924), that the Grail legend«s religious elements were derived from practices of the Celtic Church that the Latin rite had displaced ...

Author: Norris J. Lacy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136606327

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 654

View: 308

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Rhetoric of Vision

In 1914 , Williams read Waite's book The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal , and its impact on him was immediate and ... but we do know that Waite's writings , particularly The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal ( 1909 ) and The Secret ...

Author: Charles Adolph Huttar

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 9780838753149

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 372

View: 762

Charles Williams (1886-1945) was hailed by Eliot, Auden, Agee, and others for his metaphysical, ethical, and social vision. In this collection, nineteen scholars examine the rhetorical means he employed to convey that vision and the rhetorical theories that guided him. The contributors vary in approach, from close analysis of Williams's syntactic and semantic strategies to study of his larger concern for an organic unity of rhetoric and idea. They also address his cultivation of affect, aporia, dislocation, allusion, the rhetoric of genres, and other strategies. About half the essays consider Williams's fiction. They explore the theological roots of his theory of imagery; the rhetorical implications of his belief that language is inherently meaningful; his methods of creating "subjective correlatives" for heightened states of consciousness; and, in individual works of fiction, his revisionary use of time-travel and ghost-story conventions, his rhetorical application of Blakean "contraries," aspects of his diction and syntax, and his call to pursue integrity of speech as an ideal. Three essays discuss Williams's poetry, specifically his use of the occult as a mode of imagining, the social significance that permeates his idea of coinherence, and the key literary and personal influences on the evolution of his mature poetic style. Another three essays treat Williams's rhetoric in plays - his debts to medieval drama, his success with conversational style, and his reliance on ambiguity and skepticism. Finally, four examine Williams's evenhandedness and liveliness as a historian, his prose style in theological writing, his sensitivity to the rhetoric of detective fiction both as reviewer and as writer, and his markedly poetic style in literary criticism.



Pamela Colman Smith

83 Boyd Parsons, “Influences and Expression,” 353–54; see also A. E. Waite, The Hidden Church of the Holy Graal (London: Reman, 1909). 84 R. A. Gilbert, A.E. Waite: A Magician of Many Parts (London: Thorsons, 1987), 128.

Author: Elizabeth Foley O'Connor

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 1949979407

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 953

Pamela Colman Smith’s illustrations for the Rider Waite tarot deck are known to millions worldwide, but her work took her from art galleries in New York and Europe to salons with luminaries of the English suffrage movement, the Irish literary revival, and friendships with Bram Stoker, W. B. Yeats, and G. K. Chesterton. A feminist artist, poet, folklorist, editor, publisher, and stage designer who was active from 1896 through the 1920s, Colman Smith became popular for her live performances of Jamaican folktales in both England and the U.S., using the creole of the island to capture the dramatic power of these tales while driving speculation about her purposefully indeterminate racial and sexual identity. She also travelled in - and was expelled from – occult circles, and her ability to take on and cast aside a wide range of identities was central to her life’s work. Colman Smith illustrated more than 20 books and well over a hundred magazine articles, wrote two collections of Jamaican folktales, and edited two magazines. Her paintings were exhibited in galleries in the U.S. and Europe.