How I Became a North Korean

Krys Lee joins writers like Anthony Marra, Khaled Hosseini and Elnathan John in this urgent work." –San Francisco Chronicle Yongju is an accomplished student from one of North Korea's most prominent families.

Author: Krys Lee

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399563938

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 232

"Lee takes us into urgent and emotional novelistic terrain: the desperate and tenuous realms defectors are forced to inhabit after escaping North Korea.” –Adam Johnson, author of The Orphan Master’s Son "The more confusing and horrible our world becomes, the more critical the role of fiction in communicating both the facts and the meaning of other people’s lives. Krys Lee joins writers like Anthony Marra, Khaled Hosseini and Elnathan John in this urgent work." –San Francisco Chronicle Yongju is an accomplished student from one of North Korea's most prominent families. Jangmi, on the other hand, has had to fend for herself since childhood, most recently by smuggling goods across the border. Then there is Danny, a Chinese-American teenager whose quirks and precocious intelligence have long made him an outcast in his California high school. These three disparate lives converge when they flee their homes, finding themselves in a small Chinese town just across the river from North Korea. As they fight to survive in a place where danger seems to close in on all sides, in the form of government informants, husbands, thieves, abductors, and even missionaries, they come to form a kind of adoptive family. But will Yongju, Jangmi and Danny find their way to the better lives they risked everything for? Transporting the reader to one of the least-known and most threatening environments in the world, and exploring how humanity persists even in the most desperate circumstances, How I Became a North Korean is a brilliant and essential first novel by one of our most promising writers. A FINALIST FOR THE 2016 CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE Longlisted for the Carnegie Medal One of The Millions' most anticipated books of the second half of 2016 One of Elle.com's "11 Best Books to Read in August" One of Bookpage's "Six Stellar Summer Debuts"

How i Became a North Korean

The novel transports the reader to one of the most complex and threatening environments in the world, and explores how humanity persists even in the most dire of circumstances.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780571276219

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I Hear Your Voice

Here is acclaimed author Young-ha Kim’s most daring novel to date.

Author: Young-ha Kim

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 054432448X

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 389

From one of Korea’s literary stars, a novel about two orphans from the streets of Seoul: one becomes the head of a powerful motorcycle gang, and the other follows him at all costs In South Korea, underground motorcycle gangs attract society’s castoffs. They form groups of hundreds and speed wildly through cities at night. For Jae and Dongyu, two orphans, their motorcycles are a way of survival. Jae is born in a bathroom stall at the Seoul Express Bus Terminal. And Dongyu is born mute—unable to communicate with anyone except Jae. Both boys grow up on the streets of Seoul among runaway teenagers, con men, prostitutes, religious fanatics, and thieves. After years navigating the streets, Jae becomes an icon for uprooted teenagers, bringing an urgent message to them and making his way to the top of the gang. Under his leadership, the group grows more aggressive and violent—and soon becomes the police’s central target. A novel of friendship—worship and betrayal, love and loathing—and a searing portrait of what it means to come of age with nothing to call your own, I Hear Your Voice resonates with mythic power. Here is acclaimed author Young-ha Kim’s most daring novel to date.

Across the Tumen

Around 25,000 North Koreans have defected to the South as of 2013, and it seemed like the heartbreaking tale of each defector was distilled into this story."—Kim Young-il

Author: Young Sook Moon

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781624120091

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 342

View: 191

As North Korea undergoes a devasting famine, Yeong-dae loses both his parents and is forced to beg on the streets. Soon he sets off on a desperate journey to China to find his sister. This inspiring tale offers a glimpse into the horrors faced by North Korean children and their indomitable will to survive.

Drifting House

Presents a collection of short stories that depicts the lives of Korean immigrants to America in both contemporary times and immediately following the war, including a story about a woman who fakes a marriage to find her kidnapped daughter.

Author: Krys Lee

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0143122932

Category: Fiction

Page: 210

View: 630

Presents a collection of short stories that depicts the lives of Korean immigrants to America in both contemporary times and immediately following the war, including a story about a woman who fakes a marriage to find her kidnapped daughter.

Pyongyang

The perennial graphic novel about a “hermit country,” with a new cover and an introduction by Gore Verbinski Guy Delisle’s Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea is the graphic novel that made his career, an international bestseller for ...

Author: Guy Delisle

Publisher: Drawn and Quarterly

ISBN: 9781770463370

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 192

View: 867

The perennial graphic novel about a “hermit country,” with a new cover and an introduction by Gore Verbinski Guy Delisle’s Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea is the graphic novel that made his career, an international bestseller for more than ten years. Delisle became one of the few Westerners to be allowed access to the fortress-like country when he was working in animation for a French company. While living in the nation’s capital for two months on a work visa, Delisle observed everything he was allowed to see of the culture and lives of the few North Koreans he encountered, bringing a sardonic and skeptical perspective on a place rife with propaganda. As a guide to the country, Delisle is a non-believer with a keen eye for the humor and tragedy of dictatorial whims, expressed in looming architecture and tiny, omnipresent photos of the president. The absurd vagaries of everyday life become fodder for a frustrated animator’s musings as boredom and censorship sink in. Delisle himself is the ideal foil for North Korean spin, the grumpy outsider who brought a copy of George Orwell’s 1984 with him into the totalitarian nation. Pyongyang is an informative, personal, and accessible look at a dangerous and enigmatic country.

North Korean Graphic Novels

production in North Korea is an instrument for ideological education. ... Cho Jeong-Ah (2007) provides various examples of how, after the famine of the mid-1990s, novels became more candid in their depiction of economic difficulties.

Author: Martin Petersen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351668196

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 755

Graphic novels (kurimchaek) are a major art form in North Korea, produced by agents of the regime to set out its vision in a range of important areas. This book provides an analysis of North Korean graphic novels, discussing the ideals they promote and the tensions within those ideals, and examining the reception of graphic novels in North Korea and by North Korean refugees in South Korea. Particular themes considered include the ideal family and how the regime promotes this; patriotism, and its conflict with class identities; and the portrayal of the Korean War – "The Fatherland Liberation War", as it is known in North Korea – and the subsequent, continuing stand-off. Overall, the book demonstrates the importance of graphic novels in North Korea as a tool for bringing up children and for promoting North Korean ideals. In addition, however, the book also shows that although the regime sees the imaginative power of graphic novels as a necessity for effective communication, graphic novels are also viewed with caution in that they exist in everyday social life in ways that the regime may be aware of, and seeks to control, but cannot dominate completely.

Rewriting Revolution

Rewriting Revolution charts the insightful literary frontiers that critically portray individuals negotiating their political and sexual identities in a revolutionary state.

Author: Immanuel Kim

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824873602

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 619

North Korea, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), is firmly fixed in the Western imagination as a barbaric vestige of the Cold War, a “rogue” nation that refuses to abide by international norms. It is seen as belligerent and oppressive, a poor nation bent on depriving its citizens of their basic human rights and expanding its nuclear weapons program at the expense of a faltering economy. Even the North’s literary output is stigmatized and dismissed as mere propaganda literature praising the Great Leader. Immanuel Kim’s book confronts these stereotypes, offering a more complex portrayal of literature in the North based on writings from the 1960s to the present. The state, seeking to “write revolution,” prescribes grand narratives populated with characters motivated by their political commitments to the leader, the Party, the nation, and the collective. While acknowledging these qualities, Kim argues for deeper readings. In some novels and stories, he finds, the path to becoming a revolutionary hero or heroine is no longer a simple matter of formulaic plot progression; instead it is challenged, disrupted, and questioned by individual desires, decisions, doubts, and imaginations. Fiction in the 1980s in particular exhibits refreshing story lines and deeper character development along with creative approaches to delineating women, sexuality, and the family. These changes are so striking that they have ushered in what Kim calls a Golden Age of North Korean fiction. Rewriting Revolution charts the insightful literary frontiers that critically portray individuals negotiating their political and sexual identities in a revolutionary state. In this fresh and thought-provoking analysis of North Korean fiction, Kim looks past the ostensible state propaganda to explore the dynamic literary world where individuals with human emotions reside. His book fills a major lacuna and will be of interest to literary scholars and historians of East Asia, as well as to scholars of global and comparative studies in socialist countries.

Diary of a Murderer

Kim Byeongsu is losing his mind.

Author: Kim Young-ha

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 1838950036

Category: Fiction

Page: 128

View: 261

Parasite meets Han Kang in these twisted tales of murder, loyalty and obsession... Kim Byeongsu is losing his mind. Quite literally. He keeps forgetting the little things in life, like basic words, whether or not he has a dog, the last time he killed someone... In his prime, Byeongsu was one of the best murderers around, spending years obsessively trying to perfect his technique, only killing in the pursuit of artistry. And then he gave it all up to be a dedicated father to his adopted-daughter, Eunhui. Now though, suffering from the onset of dementia, he decides to come out of retirement one last time and for one final target: his daughter's boyfriend, who he believes is a serial killer just like him. After all, it takes a one to know one. In other dark and glittering tales, an affair between two childhood friends questions the limits of loyalty and love; a family disintegrates after a baby son is kidnapped and recovered years later; and a wild, erotic pursuit of creativity might just come at the expense of all sanity. 'Filled with the kind of sublime, galvanizing stories that strike like a lightning bolt, searing your nerves' Nylon

North Korea in Transition

In other words, North Korean official literature also recognizes the expanding private realms that are becoming the source of new narratives. North Korean novels have to go through rigorous censorship since they still play a pivotal ...

Author: Kyung-Ae Park

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442218134

Category: Political Science

Page: 328

View: 758

Following the death of Kim Jong Il, North Korea has entered a period of profound transformation laden with uncertainty. This authoritative book brings together the world’s leading North Korea experts to analyze both the challenges and prospects the country is facing. Drawing on the contributors’ expertise across a range of disciplines, the book examines North Korea’s political, economic, social, and foreign policy concerns. Considering the implications for Pyongyang’s transition, it focuses especially on the transformation of ideology, the Worker’s Party of Korea, the military, effects of the Arab Spring, the emerging merchant class, cultural infiltration from the South, Western aid, and global economic integration. The contributors also assess the impact of North Korea’s new policies on China, South Korea, the United States, and the rest of the world. Comprehensive and deeply knowledgeable, their analysis is especially crucial given the power consolidation efforts of the new leadership underway in Pyongyang and the implications for both domestic and international politics. Contributions by: Nicholas Anderson, Charles Armstrong, Bradley Babson, Victor Cha, Bruce Cumings, Nicholas Eberstadt, Ken Gause, David Kang, Andrei Lankov, Woo Young Lee, Liu Ming, Haksoon Paik, Kyung-Ae Park, Terence Roehrig, Jungmin Seo, and Scott Snyder.