The Huguenots of London

The different communities of Spitalfields and Soho are contrasted, and attitudes to the newcomer refugees, and their assimilation to London society, are explained. The book includes a Visitor's Guide to Huguenot London.

Author: Robin D. Gwynn

Publisher: Sussex Academic Press

ISBN: 9781898595243

Category: History

Page: 67

View: 148

This illustrated booklet details the substantial contribution Huguenot society made to English Banking and Commerce, and the Crafts and Professions, in London. It explains why London became England's Principal Refugee Centre, and the role of the French Churches. The different communities of Spitalfields and Soho are contrasted, and attitudes to the newcomer refugees, and their assimilation to London society, are explained. The book includes a Visitor's Guide to Huguenot London.

Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London

"A bibliography of some works relating to the Huguenot refugees, whence they came, where they settled": v. 1, pp. [130-149].

Author: Huguenot Society of London

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Huguenots

Page:

View: 487

"A bibliography of some works relating to the Huguenot refugees, whence they came, where they settled": v. 1, pp. [130-149].



Huguenots in Britain and Their French Background 1550 1800

The articles in this book first appeared as contributions at the Historical Conference of the Huguenot Society of London, September 1985.

Author: Irene Scouloudi

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Imports

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 570

The articles in this book first appeared as contributions at the Historical Conference of the Huguenot Society of London, September 1985. The conference papers are of interest to scholars as well as the general reader who is anxious to understand a movement which still exercises influence today. Indeed, many people who call themselves 'British' today are descendants of Huguenot refugees.


The Religious Culture of the Huguenots 1660 1750

Les réfugiés protestants de France et leur dispersion dans le monde (XVIe–XVIIIe siècles), 'La Vie des Huguenots' 17 (Paris, ... A recent brief introduction to Huguenot settlement in the capital is Robin Gwynn, The Huguenots of London ...

Author: Anne Dunan-Page

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351145541

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 173

Recent years have witnessed a revival of interest in the history of the Huguenots, and new research has increased our understanding of their role in shaping the early-modern world. Yet while much has been written about the Huguenots during the sixteenth-century wars of religion, much less is known about their history in the following centuries. The ten essays in this collection provide the first broad overview of Huguenot religious culture from the Restoration of Charles II to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Dealing primarily with the experiences of Huguenots in England and Ireland, the volume explores issues of conformity and nonconformity, the perceptions of 'refuge', and Huguenot attitudes towards education, social reform and religious tolerance. Taken together they offer the most comprehensive and up-to-date survey of Huguenot religious identity in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Huguenot Networks 1560 1780

Rather exceptionally, a number of the Huguenot diplomats in London occupied senior positions. Apart from the two Saxon envoys and Spanheim, this holds true for the younger of the Bonet brothers and for Robethon.

Author: Vivienne Larminie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351744674

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 214

These chapters explore how a religious minority not only gained a toehold in countries of exile, but also wove itself into their political, social, and religious fabric. The way for the refugees’ departure from France was prepared through correspondence and the cultivation of commercial, military, scholarly and familial ties. On arrival at their destinations immigrants exploited contacts made by compatriots and co-religionists who had preceded them to find employment. London, a hub for the “Protestant international” from the reign of Elizabeth I, provided openings for tutors and journalists. Huguenot financial skills were at the heart of the early Bank of England; Huguenot reporting disseminated unprecedented information on the workings of the Westminster Parliament; Huguenot networks became entwined with English political factions. Webs of connection were transplanted and reconfigured in Ireland. With their education and international contacts, refugees were indispensable as diplomats to Protestant rulers in northern Europe. They operated monetary transfers across borders and as fund-raisers, helped alleviate the plight of persecuted co-religionists. Meanwhile, French ministers in London attempted to hold together an exceptionally large community of incomers against heresy and the temptations of assimilation. This is a story of refugee networks perpetuated, but also interpenetrated and remade.