Imagined Communities

Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson's brilliant book on nationalism, forged a new field of study when it first appeared in 1983.

Author: Benedict Anderson

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 1844670864

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 110

The definitive, bestselling book on the origins and development of nationalism...

Beyond Imagined Communities

These essays began as a critique of the argument by Benedict Anderson's highly influential book Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism.

Author: Patterson Distinguished Term Professor of History John Charles Chasteen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 325

How did the nationalisms of Latin America's many countries -- elaborated in everything from history and fiction to cookery -- arise from their common backgrounds in the Spanish and Portuguese empires and their similar populations of mixed European, native, and African origins? Beyond Imagined Communities: Reading and Writing the Nation in Nineteenth-Century Latin America, discards one answer and provides a rich collection of others. These essays began as a critique of the argument by Benedict Anderson's highly influential book Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Anderson traces Latin American nationalisms to local circulation of colonial newspapers and tours of duty of colonial administrators, but this book shows the limited validity of these arguments. Instead, Beyond Imagined Communities shows how more diverse cultural influences shaped Latin American nationalisms. Four historians examine social situations: François-Xavier Guerra studies various forms of political communication; Tulio Halperín Donghi, political parties; Sarah C. Chambers, the feminine world of salons; and Andrew Kirkendall, the institutions of higher education that trained the new administrators. Next, four critics examine production of cultural objects: Fernando Unzueta investigates novels; Sara Castro-Klarén, archeology and folklore; Gustavo Verdesio, suppression of unwanted archeological evidence; and Beatriz González Stephan, national literary histories and international expositions.


Imagined Communities

Some people imagine that nationhood is as old as civilization itself, but Anderson argues that "nation" and "nationalism" are products of the communication technologies of the modern age.

Author: Jason Xidias

Publisher: Macat Library

ISBN: 9781912127016

Category: Nationalism

Page: 104

View: 610

Benedict Anderson's 1983 masterpiece Imagined Communities is a ground-breaking analysis of the origins and meanings of "nations" and "nationalism." A book that helped reshape the field of nationalism studies, Imagined Communities also shows the critical thinking skills of interpretation and analysis working at their highest levels. One crucial aspect of Anderson's work involves the apparently simple act of defining precisely what we mean when we say 'nation' or 'nationalism' - an interpretative step that is vital to the analysis he proceeds to carry out. For Anderson, it is clear that nations are not 'natural;' as historians and anthropologists are well aware, nations as we understand them are a relatively modern phenomenon, dating back only as far as around 1500. But if this is the case, how can we agree what a 'nation' is? Anderson's proposed definition is that they are "imagined communities" - comprising groups of people who regard themselves as belonging to the same community, even if they have never met, and have nothing in common otherwise. The analysis that follows from this insight is all about examining and breaking down the historical processes that helped foster these communities - above all the birth of printing, and the development of capitalism. Brilliantly incisive, Anderson's analysis shows how good interpretative skills can form the foundations for compelling and original insight.


Imagined Communities Constructing Collective Identities in Medieval Europe

Imagined Communities: Constructing Collective Identities in Medieval Europe offers a series of studies focusing on how perceptions of community, its shared history and imagined present, created a collective identity in medieval societies.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004363793

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 155

Imagined Communities: Constructing Collective Identities in Medieval Europe offers a series of studies focusing on how perceptions of community, its shared history and imagined present, created a collective identity in medieval societies.

Imagined Communities

But if this is the case, how can we agree what a ‘nation’ is?

Author: Jason Xidias

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1351352342

Category: History

Page: 104

View: 330

Benedict Anderson’s 1983 masterpiece Imagined Communities is a ground-breaking analysis of the origins and meanings of “nations” and “nationalism”. A book that helped reshape the field of nationalism studies, Imagined Communities also shows the critical thinking skills of interpretation and analysis working at their highest levels. One crucial aspect of Anderson’s work involves the apparently simple act of defining precisely what we mean when we say ‘nation’ or ‘nationalism’ – an interpretative step that is vital to the analysis he proceeds to carry out. For Anderson, it is clear that nations are not ‘natural;’ as historians and anthropologists are well aware, nations as we understand them are a relatively modern phenomenon, dating back only as far as around 1500. But if this is the case, how can we agree what a ‘nation’ is? Anderson’s proposed definition is that they are “imagined communities” – comprising groups of people who regard themselves as belonging to the same community, even if they have never met, and have nothing in common otherwise. The analysis that follows from this insight is all about examining and breaking down the historical processes that helped foster these communities – above all the birth of printing, and the development of capitalism. Brilliantly incisive, Anderson’s analysis shows how good interpretative skills can form the foundations for compelling and original insight.

Women s Life Writing and Imagined Communities

Recognising the great legacy of women's life writings, this book draws on a wealth of sources to critically examine the impact of these writings on our communities.

Author: Cynthia Anne Huff

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415372206

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 330

View: 870

Recognising the great legacy of women's life writings, this book draws on a wealth of sources to critically examine the impact of these writings on our communities.

The Persistence of Nationalism

This is a book about the difficulties of thinking and acting politically in ways that refuse the politics of nationalism.

Author: Angharad Closs Stephens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415623456

Category: Political Science

Page: 159

View: 256

This is a book about the difficulties of thinking and acting politically in ways that refuse the politics of nationalism. The book offers a detailed study of how contemporary attempts by theorists of cosmopolitanism, citizenship, globalism and multiculturalism to go beyond nationalism often reproduce key aspects of a nationalist imaginary. It argues that the challenge of resisting nationalism will require more than a shift in the scale of politics – from the national up to the global or down to the local, and more than a shift in the count of politics – to an emphasis on diversity and multiculturalism. In order to avoid the grip of 'nationalist thinking', we need to re-open the question of what it means to imagine community. Set against the backdrop of the imaginative geographies of the War in Terror and the new beginning promised by the Presidency of Barack Obama, the book shows how critical interventions often work in collaboration with nationalist politics, even when the aim is to resist nationalism. It claims that a nationalist imaginary includes powerful understandings of freedom, subjectivity, sovereignty and political space/time which must also be placed under question if we want to avoid reproducing ideas about 'us' and 'them'. Drawing on insights from feminist, cultural and postcolonial studies as well as critical approaches to International Relations and Geography, this book presents a unique and refreshing approach to the politics of nationalism.

Imagined Communities and Educational Possibilities

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: Yasuko Kanno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0805895701

Category: Education

Page: 109

View: 196

Imagined Communities and Educational Possibilities focuses on three main themes: imaged communities expand the range of possible selves, technological advances in the last two decades have had a significant impact on what is possible to imagine, and imagination at even the most personal level is related to social ideologies and hegemonies. The diverse studies in this issue demonstrate convincingly that learners and teachers are capable of imagining the world as different from prevailing realities. Moreover, time and energy can be invested to strive for the realization of alternative visions of the future. Research in this special issue suggests that investment in such imagined communities offers intriguing possibilities for social and educational change.


Time Refigured

Focused on the myths and mythologies of European cultural history, this volume seeks to address the present and past functions of foundation texts in the evolution of the European idea.

Author: Martin Prochazka

Publisher: Litteraria Pragensia

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 390

View: 480

Focused on the myths and mythologies of European cultural history, this volume seeks to address the present and past functions of foundation texts in the evolution of the European idea. One of the specific objectives of this volume is to reconsider, in the context of ongoing European expansion and integration, the functionalist approach of Benedict Anderson, according to whom "imagined communities . . . are to be distinguished, not by their falsity/genuineness, but by the style in which they are imagined." The common denominator of each of the essays contained in this volume is the problem of the discontinuity of time in relation to tradition, cultural and individual memory, as well as in relation to historical and literary narratives. Time becomes "the locus of its own reflexivity: it is self-temporalized. It undergoes endless reiteration within itself, and needs a semantics which sets valid accents for specific moments." (Jean Bessiere)

Imagined Communities on the Baltic Rim from the Eleventh to Fifteenth Centuries

This book traces the transformation of the Baltic Rim in this period through a focus on the self-image of a number of communities: urban and regional, cultic, missionary, legal, and political.

Author: Lars Hermanson

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9048528992

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 790

Prior to the high Middle Ages, the Baltic Rim was largely terra incognita-but by the late Middle Ages, it was home to diverse small and large communities. But the Baltic Rim was not simply the place those people lived-it was also an imagined space through which they defined themselves and their identities. This book traces the transformation of the Baltic Rim in this period through a focus on the self-image of a number of communities: urban and regional, cultic, missionary, legal, and political. Contributors look at the ways these communities defined themselves in relationship to other groups, how they constructed their identities and customs, and what held them together or tore them apart.

Imagined Communities in Greece and Turkey

Here, Emine Bedlek approaches this enormous shift in national thinking through literary texts - addressing the themes of loss, identity, memory and trauma which both populations experienced.

Author: Emine Yesim Bedlek

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0857728008

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 411

In 1923 the Turkish government, under its new leader Kemal Ataturk, signed a renegotiated Balkan Wars treaty with the major powers of the day and Greece. This treaty provided for the forced exchange of 1.3 million Christians from Anatolia to Greece, in return for 30,000 Greek Muslims. The mass migration that ensued was a humanitarian catastrophe - of the 1.3 million Christians relocated it is estimated only 150,000 were successfully integrated into the Greek state. Furthermore, because the treaty was ethnicity-blind, tens of thousands of Muslim Greeks (ethnically and linguistically) were forced into Turkey against their will. Both the Greek and Turkish leadership saw this exchange as crucial to the state-strengthening projects both powers were engaged in after the First World War. Here, Emine Bedlek approaches this enormous shift in national thinking through literary texts - addressing the themes of loss, identity, memory and trauma which both populations experienced. The result is a new understanding of the tensions between religious and ethnic identity in modern Turkey.

Schools as Imagined Communities

Below, we describe four general categorical explanations of what makes schools qualify as imagined communities and important examples of those explanations.

Author: S. Dorn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1403982937

Category: Education

Page: 217

View: 977

Government forces mean the notion of a 'community' school has become less defined by decisions on core curriculum. This collection explores the extent to which collective notions of school-community relations have prevented citizens from speaking openly about the tensions created where schools are imagined as communities.

Application of Andersons theory of imagined communities to the Colombian Diasporas in Ecuador and United States of America

Essay from the year 2016 in the subject Politics - Methods, Research, grade: 7, UNITEC New Zealand, course: Master of International Communication, language: English, abstract: This essay discusses and analyses briefly the theory by Benedict ...

Author: Alfredo Lopez

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3668945845

Category: Political Science

Page: 8

View: 141

Essay from the year 2016 in the subject Politics - Methods, Research, grade: 7, UNITEC New Zealand, course: Master of International Communication, language: English, abstract: This essay discusses and analyses briefly the theory by Benedict Anderson of "imagined communities" and the theory of "scapes" by Arjun Appadurai. After that, these theories by Anderson and Appadurai will be applied to the Colombian Diasporas in Ecuador and United States of America. Finally, the conclusion of this essay will display a summary of how Colombian Diasporas have created their own identity according to Anderson and Appadurai theories. Nowadays, there are many Diasporas scattered around the world. All of them have their own identity, culture and thoughts. It could be said that Diasporas have been formed by migration of tourists, refugees, expatriates, occasional workers, communities and overseas exile. Although Diasporas differ in culture, beliefs, background and thoughts, all have things in common such as a clear vision of their homeland, their feeling of belongingness to their homeland, their hopefulness to return to their country and their willingness of keeping their cultures and traditions. Due to those reasons, diaspora communities create their own identity which distinguishes them from other Diasporas. But the question is, why diaspora communities create their own identity abroad. Could the ideas of Benedict Anderson and Arjun Appadurai provide a clear explanation of this issue?

Imagined Communities and Educational Possibilities

However, as Anderson ( 1991), who first coined the term imagined communities, and Wenger ( 1998) in his more recent work theorized, we humans are capable of ...

Author: Yasuko Kanno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136507507

Category: Education

Page: 112

View: 989

Imagined Communities and Educational Possibilities focuses on three main themes: imaged communities expand the range of possible selves, technological advances in the last two decades have had a significant impact on what is possible to imagine, and imagination at even the most personal level is related to social ideologies and hegemonies. The diverse studies in this issue demonstrate convincingly that learners and teachers are capable of imagining the world as different from prevailing realities. Moreover, time and energy can be invested to strive for the realization of alternative visions of the future. Research in this special issue suggests that investment in such imagined communities offers intriguing possibilities for social and educational change.

Invented Lives Imagined Communities

became the privileged medium through which the imagined communities of the modern era were publicly memorialized. As Jenny Barrett reminds us in Shooting ...

Author: William H. Epstein

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438460813

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 631

How Hollywood biopics both showcase and modify various notions of what it means to be an American. Biopics—films that chronicle the lives of famous and notorious figures from our national history—have long been one of Hollywood’s most popular and important genres, offering viewers various understandings of American national identity. Invented Lives, Imagined Communities provides the first full-length examination of US biopics, focusing on key releases in American cinema while treating recent developments in three fields: cinema studies, particularly the history of Hollywood; national identity studies dealing with the American experience; and scholarship devoted to modernity and postmodernity. Films discussed include Houdini, Patton, The Great White Hope, Bound for Glory, Ed Wood, Basquiat, Pollock, Sylvia, Kinsey, Fur, Milk, J. Edgar, and Lincoln, and the book pays special attention to the crucial generic plot along which biopics traverse and showcase American lives, even as they modify the various notions of the national character. “A provocative, critically astute study, this collection examines the biopic as a reflexive, refractive modernist film genre. Admirably researched essays provide close, compelling readings of chosen films, while exploring the multilayered matrices of historical fact, biographical and autobiographical literature, popular media representations, and cultural histories—shaping not only the lives and narratives of the performers, artists, and political/historical figures represented but also the practices of the filmmakers as they worked within or on the margins of the Hollywood industry.” — Cynthia Lucia, Rider University “The volume’s greatest strengths include its range, its variety of ideas on the significance of the biopic, and its research—definitive in several cases—into the relation between historical figures and their cinematic counterparts.” — James Morrison, author of Passport to Hollywood: Hollywood Films, European Directors

Imagined Communities What Makes a Readership Share a Certain Idea of Newspapers

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, Free University of Berlin (John-F.-Kennedy-Institut), course: History of News, 6 entries in the bibliography, language: English, ...

Author: Paul Vierkant

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638766691

Category:

Page: 28

View: 316

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, Free University of Berlin (John-F.-Kennedy-Institut), course: History of News, 6 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Paper is patient! "my high school physics teacher used to say, when he corrected our exams. As he explained to us, he had heard this old printers saying many times before from his father, who was in the printing business himself. This motto is more than simply a justification for the laziness of my teacher who almost never corrected our tests on time. Since it comes out of the printing business - a business hundreds of years old - it has a broader meaning. It expresses the enduring existence of the written word. Hence, letters, black on white, are records of people's thoughts and opinions at specific points in time, from early signs of human existence on cave walls to digital letters on our modern-day computer screens. Newspapers as a medium for writing are of special interest to historians as well as to ordinary people like you and me. Throughout history newspapers have reflected society. However, it would be an over-simplification to reduce the complexity of newspapers to the mere role of mirroring. They give us useful information about editors, journalists and authors. Their patient words waiting to be read become vibrant thoughts - even though reader and source might be years apart. It is the dichotomy of individual and collective experience in reading that creates a readership. Benedict Anderson's concept of imagined communities fits into this context incredibly well. Although a reader might not know all the other readers of his or her newspaper, they still have one thing in common - they have all held the same information in their hands and read the same news. Thus the reader - being aware of this indirectly shared experience - imagines his community of fellow readers. While Anderson refers to communities that ove"

Imaginary Communities

Wegner moves well beyond the more tired moves of "new historicist" literary criticism: this is historicist scholarship in a new key."—James Epstein, author of Radical Expression: Political Language, Ritual, and Symbol in England, 1790 ...

Author: Phillip E. Wegner

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520228294

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 297

View: 213

"Imaginary Communities is a beautiful treatment of utopian narratives as the quintessential genre for figuring social space in the modern nation-state. Wegner demonstrates a wide-ranging yet lighthanded philosophical learnedness, an urgent political conscience, and a deeply historical sense that narrative utopias are like specters that haunt particular moments of upheaval, crisis, and contradiction within modernity: whether the threshold between the vestiges of feudal agrarian society and early modern English capitalism, conflicts between the new oligarchy of industrializing late 19th c. United States and the increasing militancy of the labor movement, the uneven successes and failures of the Russian Revolution of 1905, or the mid-century Cold War struggles."—Lisa Lowe, author of Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics "In this important book, Wegner argues that the historical work done by utopian narratives should be reconsidered, interrogated, challenged—and continued. Insightful and provocative, Imaginary Communities will prove a valuable contribution to our thinking about the politics of imagination."—Daniel Cottom, author of Cannibals and Philosophers: Bodies of Enlightenment "Phillip Wegner's Imaginary Communities represents a major intervention in our understanding not merely of utopian literature, but the very ways in which we view our world. His concept of utopian narrative as both vision and practice, as participating in "real" worlds, a force for change rooted in the social world "as it is" and as it is becoming and is "imagined," succeeds wonderfully well; his notion of the imperative of "failure" as a resource of hope is deeply humane. He provides a body of work worth thinking through and thinking with. As a historian, I find the historicity of his approach, the literary arch spanning from the origins of the European nation-state to our global present and future, compelling in its ambition and execution. Wegner moves well beyond the more tired moves of "new historicist" literary criticism: this is historicist scholarship in a new key."—James Epstein, author of Radical Expression: Political Language, Ritual, and Symbol in England, 1790-1850