An Irish Empire

Distributed in the US by St. Martin's Press. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Author: Keith Jeffery

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719038730

Category: Great Britain

Page: 224

View: 657

Eight essays examine the experience and role of the Irish in the British empire during the 19th and 20th centuries, based on the understanding that, Ireland being less integrated, it differed from that of the other Celtic nations submerged in the United Kingdom. They discuss film, sport, India, the Irish military tradition, Irish unionists, Empire Day in Ireland from 1896 to 1962, Northern Irish businessmen, and Ulster resistance and loyalist rebellion. Distributed in the US by St. Martin's Press. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Irish Through British Eyes

Describes the change in British perceptions of relations with Ireland as a result of the potato famine from a gendered rhetoric of marriage to one of master and servant.

Author: Edward G. Lengel

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 152

Describes the change in British perceptions of relations with Ireland as a result of the potato famine from a gendered rhetoric of marriage to one of master and servant.


Edmund Spenser s Irish Experience

The book contains an analysis of Spenser's life on the Munster plantation, readings of the political rhetoric and antiquarian discourse of A View of the Present State of Ireland, and three chapters which argue the case that the apparently ...

Author: Andrew Hadfield

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191583359

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 767

Spenser's Irish Experience is the first sustained critical work to argue that Edmund Spenser's perception and fragmented representation of Ireland shadows the whole narrative of his major work, The Faerie Queene, traditionally regarded as one of the finest achievements of the English Renaissance. The poem has often been read in specifically English contexts but, as Hadfield argues, demands to be read in terms of England's expanding colonial hegemony within the British Isles and the ensuing fear that such national ambition would actually lead to the destruction of England's post-Reformation legacy. Spenser should be seen less as an English writer and more as a new English writer in Ireland, his prose and poetry expressing the hopes and fears of his class. Where A View of the Present State of Ireland attempts to provide a violent political solution to England's Irish problem, The Faerie Queene exposes the apocalyptic fear that there may be no solution at all. The book contains an analysis of Spenser's life on the Munster plantation, readings of the political rhetoric and antiquarian discourse of A View of the Present State of Ireland, and three chapters which argue the case that the apparently Anglocentric allegory of The Faerie Queene reveals a land gradually—but clearly—transformed into its Irish other. Spenser emerges from this study as a writer whose experience in Ireland rendered him implacably opposed to the vacillations of his English monarch.

Everything Irish

An indispensable source of fascinating information and captivating anecdote, this is one book that will never be far from the hands of those with curious minds or an adventurous spirit.

Author: Lelia Ruckenstein

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0307484459

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 559

Here, in one complete volume, is the depth and breadth of the great island nation and its people represented in an easily browsed, friendly format. From the Abbey Theatre to the Dublin storyteller Zozimus; from the origin of the Troubles to the origin of the limerick; from the stunning beauty of Connemara to the shattering tragedy of Bloody Sunday; from the greatest writers of the English language to the “confrontational television” of Gay Byrne’s The Late Late Show–every aspect of Irish culture, geography, and history is collected and annotated in more than 900 entries from A to Z. Readers will encounter heroes and terrorists, poets and politicians, all of Ireland’s counties, ancient myths, and pivotal events–all expertly and succinctly described and explained. With entries written by some of the world’s leading authorities on Ireland, Everything Irish is perfect for everyone, from the inquiring reader to the serious student. You can spend a few minutes learning about the much-maligned Travelers and then move on to the equally contentious (in its time) medieval tithe. Visit the majestic Cliffs of Moher and then delve into an analysis of paramilitary groups like the Irish Republican Army and the Ulster Volunteer Force. Explore the ruins of a Romanesque castle or experience the piercing light of the winter solstice inside prehistoric Newgrange, a passage grave older than the pyramids. Across centuries and across counties, the rich landscape of Irish life and heritage springs to life in these pages. An indispensable source of fascinating information and captivating anecdote, this is one book that will never be far from the hands of those with curious minds or an adventurous spirit.

Abject Loyalty

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "Murphy's book is a comparative rarity--a book that genuinely explores a fresh theme and does so in an entirely original fashion. . .

Author: James H. Murphy

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 9780813210766

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 409

Finalist, American Conference for Irish Studies James S. Donnelly, Sr., Prize for Books on History and Social Sciences Abject Loyalty challenges the view that Irish nationalists were necessarily hostile to the British monarchy. During Queen Victoria's reign, royal visits to Ireland were in fact generally met with great enthusiasm. Indeed, the strength of the opposition of some Irish nationalists to the monarchy was a sign of the purchase that it seemed to have on the allegiance of many people within nationalist Ireland. By the 1880s, however, the monarchy had become the focus for British imperial identity in England and for the denial of constitutional legitimacy to those in Ireland who wished for home rule. It began to face increasing opposition in Ireland both because nationalist politicians feared its influence might reconcile Irish people to the Union with Britain and because enthusiasm for monarchy in Ireland was used to feed a British discourse which saw Ireland as a country that could be appeased by concessions short of home rule and which did not take nationalist demands seriously. The book traces Ireland's interaction with the British monarchy from King George III to Queen Elizabeth II but focuses on the reign of Queen Victoria. It deals with its topic on two levels. It explores Queen Victoria's interaction with Ireland and her influence on British policy towards Ireland. And it examines how Queen Victoria and monarchy were perceived in Ireland. Whereas Queen Victoria's views and actions have previously been subject to historical analysis, no previous study has seriously explored how she was perceived in Ireland or the subtleties of nationalism's attitude towards monarchy. Abject Loyalty makes a significant and original contribution to the political and cultural history of Ireland and will be of interest to those concerned with understanding the historical development of Irish identity. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: James H. Murphy is professor of English at All Hallows College in Dublin and the author or editor of numerous works, including Catholic Fiction and Social Reality in Ireland, 1873-1922, and Gender Perspectives in Nineteenth-Century Ireland (coedited with Margaret Kelleher). PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "Murphy's book is a comparative rarity--a book that genuinely explores a fresh theme and does so in an entirely original fashion. . . . His analysis changes the context for interpreting the nationalist movement in Ireland and is a must for anyone interested in the Irish during this vital era."--Prof. Alan O'Day, Mansfield College, Oxford "Well-written and provocative. . . A creative, well-written, and significant book that undoubtedly will take a deserved place within the vast historiography of nineteenth-century Ireland. More than that, it is essential reading for any scholar interested in the evolution of Irish nationalism or Anglo-Irish high politics in the Victorian age."--American Historical Review "By bridging the gulf between Anglo-Irish politics and culture, Abject Loyalty provides a fresh take on the history of nineteenth-century Anglo-Irish relations, and Murphy deftly brings to light an aspect of Irish culture that provide to be equally difficult for both nationalists and pro-Union politicians to appropriate."--History "[A] clearly-written and worthwhile study."--Frank A. Biletz, Loyola University Chicago, Albion

Ireland and the Irish

Examines Ireland today and discusses the conflicts between the goals for integrating Ireland into the European Union and the reality of its tight hold on traditional and sometimes outdated practices

Author: John Ardagh

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page: 466

View: 593

Examines Ireland today and discusses the conflicts between the goals for integrating Ireland into the European Union and the reality of its tight hold on traditional and sometimes outdated practices


Irish English

Presenting a comprehensive survey of Irish English at all levels of linguistics, this book will be invaluable to historical linguists, sociolinguists, syntacticians and phonologists alike.

Author: Raymond Hickey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139465847

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 799

English has been spoken in Ireland for over 800 years, making Irish English the oldest variety of the language outside Britain. This 2007 book traces the development of English in Ireland, both north and south, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Drawing on authentic data ranging from medieval literature to authentic contemporary examples, it reveals how Irish English arose, how it has developed, and how it continues to change. A variety of central issues are considered in detail, such as the nature of language contact and the shift from Irish to English, the sociolinguistically motivated changes in present-day Dublin English, the special features of Ulster Scots, and the transportation of Irish English to overseas locations as diverse as Canada, the United States, and Australia. Presenting a comprehensive survey of Irish English at all levels of linguistics, this book will be invaluable to historical linguists, sociolinguists, syntacticians and phonologists alike.

Nineteenth Century Ireland New Gill History of Ireland 5

The elusive search for stability is the subject of Professor D. George Boyce’s Nineteenth-Century Ireland, the fifth in the New Gill History of Ireland series.

Author: D. George Boyce

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 0717160963

Category: History

Page: 435

View: 873

The elusive search for stability is the subject of Professor D. George Boyce’s Nineteenth-Century Ireland, the fifth in the New Gill History of Ireland series. Nineteenth-century Ireland began and ended in armed revolt. The bloody insurrections of 1798 were the proximate reasons for the passing of the Act of Union two years later. The ‘long nineteenth century’ lasted until 1922, by which the institutions of modern Ireland were in place against a background of the Great War, the Ulster rebellion and the armed uprising of the nationalist Ireland. The hope was that, in an imperial structure, the ethnic, religious and national differences of the inhabitants of Ireland could be reconciled and eliminated. Nationalist Ireland mobilised a mass democratic movement under Daniel O’Connell to secure Catholic Emancipation before seeing its world transformed by the social cataclysm of the Great Irish Potato Famine. At the same time, the Protestant north-east of Ulster was feeling the first benefits of the Industrial Revolution. Although post-Famine Ireland modernised rapidly, only the north-east had a modern economy. The mixture of Protestantism and manufacturing industry integrated into the greater United Kingdom and gave a new twist to the traditional Irish Protestant hostility to Catholic political demands. In the home rule period from the 1880s to 1914, the prospect of partition moved from being almost unthinkable to being almost inevitable. Nineteenth-century Ireland collapsed in the various wars and rebellions of 1912–22. Like many other parts of Europe than and since, it had proved that an imperial superstructure can contain domestic ethnic rivalries, but cannot always eliminate them. Nineteenth-Century Ireland: Table of Contents Introduction The Union: Prelude and Aftermath, 1798–1808 The Catholic Question and Protestant Answers, 1808–29 Testing the Union, 1830–45 The Land and its Nemesis, 1845–9 Political Diversity, Religious Division, 1850–69 The Shaping of Irish Politics (1): The Making of Irish Nationalism, 1870–91 The Shaping of Irish Politics (2): The Making of Irish Unionism, 1870–93 From Conciliation to Confrontation, 1891–1914 Modernising Ireland, 1834–1914 The Union Broken, 1914–23 Stability and Strife in Nineteenth-Century Ireland