I Have a Dream

Martin Luther King Jr [RL 11 IL 9-12] These appeals for civil rights awoke a nation to the need for reform. Themes: injustice; taking a stand. 58 pages. Tale Blazers.

Author: Martin Luther King, Jr.

Publisher: Perfection Learning

ISBN: 9781563127847

Category: Political Science

Page: 59

View: 167

Martin Luther King Jr [RL 11 IL 9-12] These appeals for civil rights awoke a nation to the need for reform. Themes: injustice; taking a stand. 58 pages. Tale Blazers.

Gospel of Freedom

Gospel of Freedom gives us a startling perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it: an angry prophet who chastised American whites, found solace in the faith and resilience of the slaves, and knew that moral appeal without struggle ...

Author: Jonathan Rieder

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 162040060X

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 995

"I am in Birmingham because injustice is here," declared Martin Luther King, Jr. He had come to that city of racist terror convinced that massive protest could topple Jim Crow. But the insurgency faltered. To revive it, King made a sacrificial act on Good Friday, April 12, 1963: he was arrested. Alone in his cell, reading a newspaper, he found a statement from eight "moderate" clergymen who branded the protests extremist and "untimely." King drafted a furious rebuttal that emerged as the "Letter from Birmingham Jail"-a work that would take its place among the masterpieces of American moral argument alongside those of Thoreau and Lincoln. His insistence on the urgency of "Freedom Now" would inspire not just the marchers of Birmingham and Selma, but peaceful insurgents from Tiananmen to Tahrir Squares. Scholar Jonathan Rieder delves deeper than anyone before into the Letter-illuminating both its timeless message and its crucial position in the history of civil rights. Rieder has interviewed King's surviving colleagues, and located rare audiotapes of King speaking in the mass meetings of 1963. Gospel of Freedom gives us a startling perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it: an angry prophet who chastised American whites, found solace in the faith and resilience of the slaves, and knew that moral appeal without struggle never brings justice.



Letters to a Birmingham Jail

... Unity,” Birmingham News, April 12, 1963, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Call_For_Unity (cited 12-12013). 11. Martin Luther King Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html.

Author: Bryan Loritts

Publisher: Moody Publishers

ISBN: 0802491146

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 991

More than fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote his Letter from a Birmingham Jail. Much has transpired in the half-century since, and progress has been made in the issues that were close to Dr. King’s heart. Thankfully, the burning crosses, biting police dogs, and angry mobs of that day are long gone. But in their place, passivity has emerged. A passivity that must be addressed. That’s the aim of Letters to a Birmingham Jail. A collection of essays written by men of various ethnicities and ages, this book encourages us to pursue Christ exalting diversity. Each contribution recognizes that only the cross and empty tomb of Christ can bring true unity, and each notes that the gospel demands justice in all its forms. This was a truth that Dr. King fought and gave his life for, and this is a truth that these modern day "drum majors for justice" continue to beat.

The Companion to Southern Literature

Amber Vogel See also Birmingham , Alabama ; Civil Rights Movement ; Clergy ; Letters ; Preaching ; Race Relations ; Racism . " LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL " Martin Luther King Jr. , Why We Can't Wait ( 1964 ) ; David L. Lewis , King : A ...

Author: Joseph M. Flora

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807126929

Category: Reference

Page: 1054

View: 881

Selected as an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice Selected as an Outstanding Reference Source by the Reference and User Services Association of the American Library Association There are many anthologies of southern literature, but this is the first companion. Neither a survey of masterpieces nor a biographical sourcebook, The Companion to Southern Literature treats every conceivable topic found in southern writing from the pre-Columbian era to the present, referencing specific works of all periods and genres. Top scholars in their fields offer original definitions and examples of the concepts they know best, identifying the themes, burning issues, historical personalities, beloved icons, and common or uncommon stereotypes that have shaped the most significant regional literature in memory. Read the copious offerings straight through in alphabetical order (Ancestor Worship, Blue-Collar Literature, Caves) or skip randomly at whim (Guilt, The Grotesque, William Jefferson Clinton). Whatever approach you take, The Companion’s authority, scope, and variety in tone and interpretation will prove a boon and a delight. Explored here are literary embodiments of the Old South, New South, Solid South, Savage South, Lazy South, and “Sahara of the Bozart.” As up-to-date as grit lit, K Mart fiction, and postmodernism, and as old-fashioned as Puritanism, mules, and the tall tale, these five hundred entries span a reach from Lady to Lesbian Literature. The volume includes an overview of every southern state’s belletristic heritage while making it clear that the southern mind extends beyond geographical boundaries to form an essential component of the American psyche. The South’s lavishly rich literature provides the best means of understanding the region’s deepest nature, and The Companion to Southern Literature will be an invaluable tool for those who take on that exciting challenge. Description of Contents 500 lively, succinct articles on topics ranging from Abolition to Yoknapatawpha 250 contributors, including scholars, writers, and poets 2 tables of contents — alphabetical and subject — and a complete index A separate bibliography for most entries


Letter from the Birmingham Jail

Bristling with the energy and resonance of his great speeches, Letter from the Birmingham Jail is both a compelling defense of nonviolent demonstration and a rallying cry for an end to social discrimination that is just as powerful today as ...

Author: Martin Luther King (Jr.)

Publisher: Harpercollins

ISBN: 9780062509550

Category: African Americans

Page: 35

View: 410

Martin Luther King, Jr. rarely had time to answer his critics. But on April 16, 1963, he was confined to the Birmingham jail, serving a sentence for participating in civil rights demonstrations. "Alone for days in the dull monotony of a narrow jail cell", King pondered a letter that fellow clergymen had published urging him to drop his campaign of nonviolent resistance and to leave the battle for racial equality to the courts. In response, King drafted his most extensive and forceful written statement against social injustice - a remarkable essay that focused the world's attention on Birmingham and spurred the famous March on Washington. Bristling with the energy and resonance of his great speeches, Letter from the Birmingham Jail is both a compelling defense of nonviolent demonstration and a rallying cry for an end to social discrimination that is just as powerful today as it was more than twenty years ago.

Letters to a Birmingham Jail

Collects essays that use Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as their focus and encourage diversity in the pursuit of Christ.

Author: Bryan Loritts

Publisher: Moody Publishers

ISBN: 9780802411969

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 841

Collects essays that use Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as their focus and encourage diversity in the pursuit of Christ.

Ebony

From a cell in the Birmingham jail, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., leader of the demonstrations, answered the Roman Catholic, Protestant and Jewish religious leaders in a personal letter, excerpts from which are printed here with the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 118

View: 858

EBONY is the flagship magazine of Johnson Publishing. Founded in 1945 by John H. Johnson, it still maintains the highest global circulation of any African American-focused magazine.