Little Sticker Dolly Dressing Halloween

Dress the dolls for a Halloween fancy dress party in this enchanting activity book.

Author: Fiona Watt

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781474950435

Category:

Page: 34

View: 127

Dress the dolls for a Halloween fancy dress party in this enchanting activity book. There are bat and cat costumes, pumpkins, ghosts, witches, fairies, princesses and lots more. With reusable stickers of the costumes and accessories, there are also spooky spiders, webs, bats and grinning carved lanterns to decorate the pages. A younger version of the bestselling Sticker Dolly Dressing series, which contains over 40 titles, Little Sticker Dolly Dressing is an endearing new series for children aged four and up; with gentle, attractive illustrations and simple text children can easily understand. An interactive activity book that requires lots of concentration and children will enjoy completing. There is also a fold-out cover at the back of the book where children can "park" their stickers as they work. Features glossy pages and reusable stickers.

Cincinnati Magazine

We knew this going in: We're an all- white staff, excepting Aiesha D. Little, who
has been working full-time at the magazine ... HELLO, DOLLY! ... service Visit
Northern Kentucky's premier dress shop for: • Blacktie and Special Occasion •
Weddings: Brides, Mothers, ... Even the evening trick-or-treating hours on
Halloween were moved to the daytime. ... Despite the name and the official-
looking window sticker posted on doors of savings and loans, the ODGF was a
private organization.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 148

View: 364

Cincinnati Magazine taps into the DNA of the city, exploring shopping, dining, living, and culture and giving readers a ringside seat on the issues shaping the region.

Literary Austin

On Halloween you occasionally find the most bizarre mythic halfbreeds —
Werewolf under Stetson , Frankenstein in Tony ... s walked through The Spoke ' s
doors — from Johnny Gimble to George Jones , from Kris Kristofferson to Dolly
Parton . ... Delaware to Germany , and displayed bumper stickers ( “ I Danced at
The Broken Spoke ” ) that , as a little note points ... same bottled Thousand Island
dressing on a wedge of lettuce , same pool tables and shuffle boards right there
among ...

Author: Don Graham

Publisher: Texas Christian University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 461

View: 951

Don Graham brings together the history, color, and character of Texas's capital city since 1839 when it was selected, on the advice of Mirabeau B. Lamar, as the site for a new capital of the then-Republic of Texas. Essays, fiction, and poetry reveal the variety of literary responses to Austin through the decades and are organized in a roughly chronological fashion to reveal the themes, places, and personalities that have defined the life of the city. Austin was always about three thingsnatural beauty, government, and educationand thus many of the pieces in this volume dwell upon one and sometimes all of these themes. Besides O. Henry, the other most important figures in the city's history were J. Frank Dobie, Roy Bedichek, and Walter P. Webb: folklorist, naturalist, historian. During their heyday, from the 1930s through the early 1960s, they were the face of literary culture in the city. They remain a source of interest, pride, and sometimes controversy. Austin is a well-known haven of liberal political activism, represented by such well-known figures as Lyndon B. Johnson, Ralph Yarborough, Ann and David Richards, Liz Carpenter, Willie Morris, John Henry Faulk, and Molly Ivins. The city is also a haven for literary writers, many of whom appear in these pages: Carolyn Osborn, Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, Dagoberto Gilb, Stephen Harrigan, and Lawrence Wright, to name a few. Among the poets, Thomas Whitbread, Dave Oliphant, David Wevill, and Christopher Middleton have long been on the scene. Certain sites recurthe University Tower, Barton Springs, various watering holes of another kindso that for anybody who has ever spent time in Austin will experience twinges of nostalgia for vanished icons, closed-down venues, long-gone sites of pleasure brought to life once again, in these pages.