Lords of the Bow

This title follows Genghis as he consolidates power over the Mongol tribes and invades China, with its strange and opulent culture.

Author: Conn Iggulden

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 000735326X

Category: Historical fiction

Page: 480

View: 421

The gathering of the tribes of the Mongols has been a long time in coming but finally, triumphantly, Temujin of the Wolves, Genghis Khan, is given the full accolade of the overall leader and their oaths. Now he can begin to meld all the previously warring people into one army, one nation. But the task Genghis has set himself and them is formidable. He is determined to travel to the land of the long-time enemy, the Chin and attack them there. The distances and terrain-the wide deserts, the impenetrable mountains-make it a difficult venture even for the legendary Mongolian speed of movement, but the greatest problem is that of the complex fortifications, a way of fighting wars of a settled urban population which the nomadic Mongolians had never come across. Finding ways to tackle that and keeping his tribes together in a strange environment presents another new and exciting challenge for Genghis Khan.Not only must Genghis succeed in this incredible campaign, but he must also reconcile the restless factions among his own generals, mediate between his ambitious brothers and cope with his own reactions to his growing sons. The young warrior has become a notable and victorious military commander of thousands: he must now learn to become a great leader of peoples of many different races and religions.LORDS OF THE BOW is a deeply satisfying novel. It is epic in scope, convincing, and fascinating in the narration of an extraordinary story. Above all Genghis Khan continues to dominate the scene as he matures from the young boy of Wolf of the Plains to the great Conqueror.

Genghis Lords of the Bow

Even worse were the descriptions of huge bow weapons on the battlements,
manned by silent, watching soldiers. Genghis studied Lian for some sign that the
mason was not intimidated, but the man visibly drooped in the saddle. Like the ...

Author: Conn Iggulden

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 9780440337553

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 792

From the author of the bestselling The Dangerous Book for Boys BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Conn Iggulden's Khan: Empire of Silver. For centuries, primitive tribes have warred with one another. Now, under Genghis Khan—a man who lives for battle and blood—they have united as one nation, overcoming moats, barriers, deceptions, and superior firepower only to face the ultimate test of all: the great, slumbering walled empire of the Chin. Genghis Khan comes from over the horizon, a single Mongol warrior surrounded by his brothers, sons, and fellow tribesmen. With each battle his legend grows and the ranks of his horsemen swell, as does his ambition. In the city of Yenking—modern-day Beijing—the Chin will make their final stand, confident behind their towering walls, setting a trap for the Mongol raiders. But Genghis will strike with breathtaking audacity, never ceasing until the emperor himself is forced to kneel.

A Dictionary of the Bible A Feasts

BOW . - Battle - bows , ' so named ( Zec gio 10 % ) , BOTTOM . - 1 . Common
enough for thedeep of the were probably of ... Literally , as 2 Ch 2118 the LORD
thine olive tree , thou shalt not bough it ' ( text smote him in his bowels ( on ) with
an ...

Author: James Hastings

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bible

Page: 991

View: 925


A iust apologie for the gesture of kneeling in the act of receiuing the Lords Supper Against the manifold exceptions of all opposers in the Churches of England and Scotland By T P The dedicatory epistle signed Thomas Paybody

Elkanab wentyçerely to bow downe , and to sacrifice vnco the Lord of hofts in
Sbia lob , 1 Sam . 1. 3. Bring an offering , and come before the Lord , bow downe
to him in the beauty of holines , 1 Chron . 16,29 . In these four first places Our ...

Author: T. P.

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 496

View: 545





A New and Complete Concordance Or Verbal Index to Words Phrases Passages in the Dramatic Works of Shakespeare

IV . iii l 168 A ' drew a good bow ; and dead ! a ' shot a fine shoot 2 llen . IV . iii 2
48 I will counterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man and give it And God
forbid , my dear and faithful lord , That you should fashion , bountiful to the
desires ...

Author: John Bartlett

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English language

Page: 1910

View: 915




The Complete Concordance to Shakspere

Timon of Athens i . 1 bows unto the grave with mickle age v . 1 no boy , but as
well as I can do them ii . 1 many a bounteous year .... sii . 3 and , lords , bow low
to him ... .3 Henry VI . i . 4 ay boy it's for love with more money , bounteous Timon
iv .

Author: Mary Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 860

View: 878


The Complete Concordance to Shakespeare

1 belike , boy , then you are in love ii . 1 we'll share a bounteous time .. Timon of
Athens i . I bows unto the grave with mickle age v . 1 no boy , but as well as I can
do them ii . 1 many a bounteous year ... iii . 3 and , lords , bow low to him ...

Author: Mary Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English language

Page: 860

View: 706



The Complete Concordance to Shakspere Being a Verval Index to All the Passages in the Dramatic Works of the Poet New Ed

1 belike , boy , then you are in love . . . . ii . 1 we ' ll share a bounteous tiine . .
Timon of Athens i . 1 bows unto the grave with mickle age v . 1 no boy , but as
well as I can do them ii . 1 many a bounteous year . . . . . . . . . . . . - jii . 3 and , lords
, bow ...

Author: Mary-Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 860

View: 274


The Complete Concordance to Shakspere

1 and taste lord Timon's bounty i . 1 that all my bowels ... 2 in the bowels of the
Lord ii . ... 3 thy lord's a bountiful gentleman .... iii , 1 constrains a man to bow in
the hams O boy , thou hadst a father BOUNTIFULLY - commend me bountifully iii
.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 860

View: 150


The Complete Concordance to Shakspere Being a Verbal Index to All the Passages in the Dramatic Works of the Poet by Mrs Cowden Clarke

1 and taste lord Timon's hounty that all my bowels crumble .... V. 7 had bound me
up from mine own . ... 2 in the bowels of the Lord ii . 4 am bound to load thy merit
richly i . ... 3 and , lords , bow low to him ... 3 Henry VI . i . 4 ay boy it's for love ...

Author: Mary Cowden Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 860

View: 115


Alhalla the Lord of Talladega A Tale of the Creek War With Some Selected Miscellanies Chiefly of Early Date

Brave were their hearts, and strong in sinewy strength They drew the shaft that
fell'd the stately deer, Or spread the craven foeman at his length, And triumphed
in the battle's wild career, A wanderer of the woods—lord of the bow and spear.

Author: Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465556397

Category: France

Page:

View: 981

Stretched on his couch, the Indian warrior lay, His bow and quiver prostrate at his side, Revolving all his fate in still dismay, Dominion lost, skill baffled, power defied. “Shades of my fathers!” thus his reverie ran, “And shall the Red Man thus, in clouds decline, With no memorial of his name or clan, Or only left to point the poet’s line, And tell to other years, the tale of his decline?” “Oh, is it thus, the noble woodswise race, Shall steal away to an unhonored tomb, Who once were lords of the ascendant chase, And swept the forests in their pristine bloom? Brave were their hearts, and strong in sinewy strength They drew the shaft that fell’d the stately deer, Or spread the craven foeman at his length, And triumphed in the battle’s wild career, A wanderer of the woods—lord of the bow and spear.” “Ah tell me, Spirit of the Golden West! Say, is it want of knowledge dooms my race? Or the wild passions of an untamed breast, That leaves nor peace nor virtue there a place? Can raging tumults of the mortal soul Prejudge its fate, and lead the wayward mind Through seas of want and poverty to roll, Till in a gloom of fixed despair it find Life’s path without a friend, and even death unkind?” “Doth human rectitude, in mind and heart, The inward purposes of right and wrong In human acts—so great a boon impart, Or lead, by their neglect, to thraldom strong? And can it be, ye messengers of air! Who know the great high Spirit’s sov’reign will, So vast a detriment he can prepare For those who follow nature’s dictates still, And worship Manitoes on every breezy hill?” “’Tis wondrous all, and yet there are, I ween, Some inward inklings of the Indian soul That whisper to his mind of things unclean, That taint his rites, and all his life control, Leading the mind—whenever he would do An evil act, or e’en the purpose form, To that High Excellence beyond the view, Who guides the sun and regulates the storm, Dispensing winter winds, or summer breezes warm.”