Lost to the Sea Britain s Vanished Coastal Communities The Yorkshire Coast Holderness

Long, David, Lost Britain, Michael O'Mara, 2015. Magnusson, Magnus & Palsson, Hermann, King Harald's Saga, Penguin, 1976. Mathison, Phil, The Spurn Gravel ...

Author: Stephen Wade

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473893453

Category: Nature

Page: 144

View: 441

Once there was a Roman settlement on what is now Filey Brig. In Holderness, a prosperous town called Ravenser saw kings and princes on its soil, and its progress threatened the good people of Grimsby. But the Romans and the Ravenser folk are long gone, as are their streets and buildings sunk beneath the hungry waves of what was once the German Ocean.Lost to the Sea: The Yorkshire Coast & Holderness tells the story of the small towns and villages that were swallowed up by the North Sea. Old maps show an alarming number of such places that no longer exist. Over the centuries, since prehistoric times, people who settled along this stretch have faced the constant and unstoppable hunger of the waves, as the Yorkshire coastline has gradually been eaten away. County directories of a century ago lament the loss of communities once included in their listings; cliffs once seeming so strong have steadily crumbled into the water. In the midst of this, people have tried to live and prosper through work and play, always aware that their great enemy, the relentless sea, is facing them. As the East Coast has lost land, the mud flats around parts of Spurn, at the mouth of the Humber, have grown. Stephen Wades book tells the history of that vast land of Holderness as well, which the poet Philip Larkin called the end of land.

Lost Buildings of Britain

When they are lost their influence may live on but the power they exert on our
quality of life is destroyed for all time. That is why it is more important than ever
before for twenty-first-century Britain to treat the modernization and development
of ...

Author: Simon Thurley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 213

View: 976

Accompanying a six-part series on Channel Four, this volume features six buildings, including Glastonbury monastery and the Theatre Royal.

Lost Britain

The book shines a light on the hidden corners of Britain's history, exploring medieval ghost villages, former architectural masterpieces, the purported resting place of Anne Boleyn's heart, England's Atlantis, God's Gift, a German war ...

Author: David Long

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN: 1782434410

Category: Travel

Page: 192

View: 792

From vanished villages and bygone businesses to abandoned architecture, forgotten pastimes and projects put on hold, Lost Britain tells the intriguing story of Britain's buildings, counties, transport, languages, roads and rivers that have been forgotten over the centuries. The book shines a light on the hidden corners of Britain's history, exploring medieval ghost villages, former architectural masterpieces, the purported resting place of Anne Boleyn's heart, England's Atlantis, God's Gift, a German war cemetery, the hamlet of Lost in Aberdeenshire, the old Welsh railway run on seven different forms of power and a missing fort in County Down, not to mention how Britain used to be connected to mainland Europe. Exploring the history of the lost parts of Britain, author David Long both mourns their loss and celebrates the achievements of the engineers and architects of past generations, revealing some extraordinary features of this nation's history that should not be forgotten.

What We Have Lost

James Hamilton-Paterson turns his literary and analytical skills to the wider picture of Britain's lost industrial and technological civilisation.

Author: James Hamilton-Paterson

Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd

ISBN: 1784972347

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 706

'Exquisitely written and ripe with detail' Sunday Times. 'An engaging book ... He knows his British stuff' The Times. 'One of England's most skilled and alluring prose writers in or out of fiction, has done something even more original' London Review of Books. WHAT WE HAVE LOST IS A MISSILE AIMED AT THE BRITISH ESTABLISHMENT, A BLISTERING INDICTMENT OF POLITICIANS AND CIVIL SERVANTS, PLANNING AUTHORITIES AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, WHO HAVE PRESIDED, SINCE 1945, OVER THE DECLINE OF BRITAIN'S INDUSTRIES AND REPLACED THE 'GREAT' IN BRITAIN WITH A FOR SALE SIGN HUNG AROUND THE NECK OF THE NATION. Between 1939 and 1945, Britain produced around 125,000 aircraft, and enormous numbers of ships, motor vehicles, armaments and textiles. We developed radar, antibiotics, the jet engine and the computer. Less than seventy years later, the major industries that had made Britain a global industrial power, and employed millions of people, were dead. Had they really been doomed, and if so, by what? Can our politicians have been so inept? Was it down to the superior competition of wily foreigners? Or were our rulers culturally too hostile to science and industry? James Hamilton-Paterson, in this evocation of the industrial world we have lost, analyzes the factors that turned us so quickly from a nation of active producers to one of passive consumers and financial middlemen.

Empire Lost

Using government records, private letters and diaries and contemporary media sources, this book examines the key themes affecting the relationship between Britain and the Dominions during the Second World War, the Empire's last great ...

Author: Andrew Stewart

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1847252443

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 573

Using government records, private letters and diaries and contemporary media sources, this book examines the key themes affecting the relationship between Britain and the Dominions during the Second World War, the Empire's last great conflict. It asks why this political and military coalition was ultimately successful in overcoming the challenge of the Axis powers but, in the process, proved unable to preserve itself. Although these changes were inevitable the manner of the evolution was sometimes painful, as Britain's wartime economic decline left its political position exposed in a changing post-war international system.

Lost Treasures of Britain

Describes buildings, gardens, paintings, jewels, and manuscripts no longer in existence, examines their fate, and discusses the question of preservation

Author: Roy Strong

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 231

View: 404

Describes buildings, gardens, paintings, jewels, and manuscripts no longer in existence, examines their fate, and discusses the question of preservation

Britain s lost revolution

This book is a frontal attack on an entrenched orthodoxy.

Author: Daniel Szechi

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 1847799884

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 169

This book is a frontal attack on an entrenched orthodoxy. Our official, public vision of the early eighteenth century demonises Louis XIV and France and marginalises the Scots Jacobites. Louis is seen as an incorrigibly imperialistic monster and the enemy of liberty and all that is good and progressive. The Jacobite Scots are presented as so foolishly reactionary and dumbly loyal that they were (sadly) incapable of recognising their manifest destiny as the cannon fodder of the first British empire. But what if Louis acted in defence of a nation’s liberties and (for whatever reason) sought to right a historic injustice? What if the Scots Jacobites turn out to be the most radical, revolutionary party in early eighteenth-century British politics? Using newly discovered sources from the French and Scottish archives this exciting new book challenges our fundamental assumptions regarding the emergence of the fully British state in the early eighteenth century.

Programmed Inequality

By 1974, the British computer industry was all but extinct. Marie Hicks's Programmed inequality explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize.

Author: Marie Hicks

Publisher: History of Computing

ISBN: 0262535181

Category: Computer industry

Page: 342

View: 338

In 1944, Britain led the world in electronic computing. By 1974, the British computer industry was all but extinct. Marie Hicks's Programmed inequality explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize. Women were a hidden engine of growth in high technology from World War II to the 1960s. As computing experienced a gender flip, becoming male-identified in the 1960s and 1970s, labor problems grew into structural ones, and gender discrimination caused the nation's largest computer user - the civil service and sprawling public sector -- to make decisions that were disastrous for the British computer industry and the nation as a whole. Programmed inequality shows how the disappearance of women from the field has grave macroeconomic consequences for Britain, and why the United States risks repeating those errors in the twenty-first century.

Strikes in Britain

A Research Study of Industrial Stoppages in the United Kingdom Great Britain.
Department of ... 5 Percentage of working days lost accounted for by the mining ,
manufacturing , construction and transport sectors of economic activity 1966–75 .

Author: Great Britain. Department of Employment. Research and Planning Division

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Grèves et lock-out - Grande-Bretagne

Page: 180

View: 121


Churchill Hitler and The Unnecessary War

Among the British and Churchillian errors were: • The secret decision of a tiny cabal in the inner Cabinet in 1906 to take Britain straight to war against Germany, should she invade France • The vengeful Treaty of Versailles that ...

Author: Patrick J. Buchanan

Publisher: Crown Forum

ISBN: 0307409562

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 249

Were World Wars I and II inevitable? Were they necessary wars? Or were they products of calamitous failures of judgment? In this monumental and provocative history, Patrick Buchanan makes the case that, if not for the blunders of British statesmen– Winston Churchill first among them–the horrors of two world wars and the Holocaust might have been avoided and the British Empire might never have collapsed into ruins. Half a century of murderous oppression of scores of millions under the iron boot of Communist tyranny might never have happened, and Europe’s central role in world affairs might have been sustained for many generations. Among the British and Churchillian errors were: • The secret decision of a tiny cabal in the inner Cabinet in 1906 to take Britain straight to war against Germany, should she invade France • The vengeful Treaty of Versailles that mutilated Germany, leaving her bitter, betrayed, and receptive to the appeal of Adolf Hitler • Britain’s capitulation, at Churchill’s urging, to American pressure to sever the Anglo-Japanese alliance, insulting and isolating Japan, pushing her onto the path of militarism and conquest • The greatest mistake in British history: the unsolicited war guarantee to Poland of March 1939, ensuring the Second World War Certain to create controversy and spirited argument, Churchill, Hitler, and “the Unnecessary War” is a grand and bold insight into the historic failures of judgment that ended centuries of European rule and guaranteed a future no one who lived in that vanished world could ever have envisioned.

The Missing Lynx

With the world going through a 'sixth extinction' caused by widespread habitat destruction, climate change and an ever-growing human population, this timely book explores the spaces that extinction has left unfilled, in Britain and ...

Author: Ross Barnett

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472957334

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 994

Britain's lynx are missing, and they have been for more than a thousand years. Why have they gone? And might they come back? A mere 15,000 years ago, Britain was a very different place – home to lions, lynx, bears, wolves, bison and many more megafauna. But as the climate changed and human populations expanded, changing habitats and wiping out wildlife, most of the British megafauna disappeared. Will we ever be able to bring these mammals back? And if it's possible, should we? In The Missing Lynx, palaeontologist Ross Barnett uses case studies, new fossil discoveries, biomolecular evidence and more to paint a picture of these lost species, and to explore the significance of their disappearance in ecological terms. He also discusses how the Britons these animals shared their lives with might have viewed them, and questions why some survived while others vanished. Barnett also looks in detail at the realistic potential of reintroductions, rewilding and even of resurrection, both in Britain and overseas, from the innovative Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve to the revolutionary Pleistocene Park in Siberia, which has already seen progress in the revival of 'mammoth steppe'. With the world going through a 'sixth extinction' caused by widespread habitat destruction, climate change and an ever-growing human population, this timely book explores the spaces that extinction has left unfilled, in Britain and elsewhere. By understanding why some of our most charismatic animals are gone, we can look to a brighter future, perhaps with some of these missing beasts returned to the land on which they once lived and died.

The Lost World of British Communism

Raphael Samuel, one of post-war Britain's most notable historians, draws on novels of the period and childhood recollections of London's East End, as well as memoirs and Party archives.

Author: Raphael Samuel

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 772

The Lost World of British Communismis a vivid account of the Communist Party of Great Britain. Raphael Samuel, one of post-war Britain's most notable historians, draws on novels of the period and childhood recollections of London's East End, as well as memoirs and Party archives. He evokes the world of British Communism in the 1940s, when the movement was at the height of its political and theoretical power, and raises prophetic questions about socialist motivation, collective identity, and historicizing the Communist past.

Malta Britain and the European Powers 1793 1815

... commanding British forces in Malta, wrote Hobart a similar letter, stressing how much the Maltese regretted the prospect of losing British protection.14 ...

Author: Desmond Gregory

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838635902

Category: Political Science

Page: 370

View: 779

This book describes how the island of Malta became a protectorate of the British Crown during the wars against Napoleon after the failures of the Knights of Saint John, republican France, the Two Sicilies, and finally imperial Russia to fill the role of its best defender. Author Desmond Gregory also explains why most, though not all, Maltese people welcomed the protection of Britain, the supreme naval power in the Mediterranean after the battle of Aboukir Bay.

The Lost War

Letters from British Officers During the American Revolution Marion Balderston,
David Syrett. Coeptis ... A fourth explanation is, again, one that finds some
support scattered throughout these pages of letters: that Britain lost the war
because of ...

Author: Marion Balderston

Publisher: New York : Horizon Press

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 237

View: 670


The Profit and Loss of Great Britain and Spain from the Commencement of the Present War to this Time Impartially Stated with Proper Remarks Upon the List of British Ships in a Pamphlet Intitled Hireling Artifice Detected In a Letter to the Author

Released and retaken , Remains to the Loss of Great - Britain , 295 . No. Lost carrying into St. Sebaftians , 1 . 19 . Blown up , engaging a Privateer , 1 .

Author: Philalethes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Anglo-Spanish War, 1739-1748

Page: 62

View: 704


Britain in Transition

In the course of four or five months along the Somme , British losses totaled more than 400,000 in killed , wounded and missing . Air raids on Britain ...

Author: Alfred F. Havighurst

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226319711

Category: History

Page: 691

View: 166

This new edition extends and brings up to date the story of political, economic, and social change among the British. An entirely new chapter covers the Thatcher years, discussing such events as the Falkland Island crisis and the General Election of 1983. Other sections have been revised to reflect information only recently available. Throughout, Havighurst has incorporated material from official documents, monographs, biographies, articles, and the press. His fascinating narrative fully captures the ongoing importance of change itself in shaping the character of Britain.


Israel s Lost Ten Tribes

Find a deeper appreciation for your personal heritage with this timely book.

Author: Vaughn E. Hansen

Publisher: Cedar Fort

ISBN: 9781599559513

Category: Religion

Page: 117

View: 360

Learn exciting and little-known information about what happened to the children of Israel when they were scattered. Vaughn E. Hansen pieces together fact and legend to show how the Israelites came to European countries, especially Great Britain, early on and laid a foundation of nobility and faith that has survived for over 2,400 years. Find a deeper appreciation for your personal heritage with this timely book.

A Yank in Britain

Memoirs of documentary film producer Charles Urban who was one of the most important figures in the film industry prior to the First World War.

Author: Charles Urban

Publisher: The Projection Box

ISBN: 9780952394129

Category: Motion picture industry

Page: 95

View: 617


Underlands

Spurred on by the erasure of history and industry, Ted Nield journeyed across this buried landscape: from the small Welsh village where his mining ancestors were born and died, to Swansea, Aberdeen, East Lothian, Surrey and Dorset.

Author: Ted Nield

Publisher: Granta Books

ISBN: 184708673X

Category: Nature

Page:

View: 344

Not so long ago, our roads, buildings, gravestones and monuments were built from local rock, our cities were powered by coal from Welsh mines, and our lamps were lit with paraffin from Scottish shale. We live among the remnants of those times but for the most part our mines are gone, our buildings are no longer local, and the flow of stone travels east to west. Spurred on by the erasure of history and industry, Ted Nield journeyed across this buried landscape: from the small Welsh village where his mining ancestors were born and died, to Swansea, Aberdeen, East Lothian, Surrey and Dorset. Nield unearths the veins of coal, stone, oil, rock and clay that make up the country beneath our feet, exploring what the loss of kinship between past and present means for Britain and the rest of the world today.