Pedagogies of the Imagination

In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools. This book is about the practice of Imaginal Knowing in education.

Author: Timothy Leonard

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402083505

Category: Education

Page: 270

View: 641

I have long admired the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies. That admiration followed from my experience as a high-school teacher of English in a wealthy suburb of New York City at the end of the 1960s. A “dream” job—I taught four classes of 15–20 students during a nine-period day—in a “dream” suburb (where I could afford to reside only by taking a room in a retired teacher’s house), many of these often Ivy-League-bound students had everything but meaningful lives. This middle-class, Midwestern young teacher was flabbergasted. In one sense, my academic life has been devoted to understanding that searing experience. Matters of meaning seemed paramount in the curriculum field to which Paul Klohr introduced me at Ohio State. Klohr assigned me the work of curriculum theorists such as James B. Macdonald. Like Timothy Leonard (who also studied with Klohr at Ohio State) and Peter Willis, Macdonald (1995) understood that school reform was part of a broader cultural and political crisis in which meaning is but one casualty. In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools.

Maxine Greene and the Pedagogy of Social Imagination

In the initial descriptive analysis of imagination, I aim to illustrate that imagination can be a dynamic or a destructive force. ... (2013a) critical pedagogy on the radical imagination and the “disimagination machine.

Author: Hannah Spector

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351014811

Category: Education

Page: 128

View: 679

Devoted to and inspired by the late Maxine Greene, a champion of education and advocator of the arts, this book recognizes the importance of Greene’s scholarship by revisiting her oeuvre in the context of the intellectual historicity that shaped its formation. As a scholar, Greene dialogued with philosophers, social theorists, writers, musicians, and artists. These conversations reveal the ways in which the arts, just like philosophy and science, allow for the facilitation of "wide-awakeness," a term that is central to Greene’s pedagogy. Amidst contemporary trends of neoliberal, one-size-fits-all curriculum reforms in which the arts are typically squeezed out or pushed aside, Greene’s work reminds us that the social imagination is stunted without the arts. Artistic ways of knowing allow for people to see beyond their own worlds and beyond "what is" into other worlds of "what was" and "what might" be some day. This volume demonstrates Maxine Greene’s profound ability to illuminate the importance of the artistic world and the imaginary for development of the self in the world and for encouraging a "wide-awakeness" reflective of an emerging political awareness and a longing for a democratic world that "is not yet." This book was originally published as a Special Issue of The Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies.

The Pedagogical Imagination

Discussions of object lesson pedagogy in late nineteenthcentury France were also therefore vehicles for larger discussions aboutcore republican valuesand their survival among future ... The Pedagogical Imagination goes evenfurther.

Author: Leon Sachs

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803255128

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 632

French school debates of recent years, which are simultaneously debates about the French Republic’s identity and values, have generated a spate of internationally successful literature and film on the topic of education. While mainstream media and scholarly essays tend to treat these works as faithful representations of classroom reality, The Pedagogical Imagination takes a different approach. In this study of French education and republicanism as represented in twenty-first-century French literature and film, Leon Sachs shifts our attention from “what” literature and film say about education to “how” they say it. He argues that the most important literary and filmic treatments of French education in recent years—the works of Agnès Varda, Érik Orsenna, Abdellatif Kechiche, François Bégaudeau—do more than merely depict the present-day school crisis. They explore questions of education through experiments with form. The Pedagogical Imagination shows how such techniques engage present-day readers and viewers in acts of interpretation that reproduce pedagogical principles of active, experiential learning—principles at the core of late nineteenth-century educational reform that became vehicles for the diffusion of republican ideology.

Rudolf Steiner s Pedagogy of Imagination

Table 6 – The Continuum of the Pedagogy of Imagination ' Subunit ' ' Holistic Unit ' 1 Child 1 Teacher 1 Class 1 Teacher Divisions of School The School Imaginative Transaction Parents and Community In - depth ' Pedagogy of Imagination ...

Author: Thomas William Nielsen

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9783039103423

Category: Medical

Page: 268

View: 918

This book investigates the concept and practises of imaginative teaching. Since Rudolf Steiner (founder of the Waldorf schools) wrote extensively on the subject and is renowned for his contributions to education, his work is used to develop insights into the nature of 'imaginative teaching'. Given the societal changes since Steiner's time, however, the topic is further developed by examining imaginative teaching in three Steiner primary classrooms, using the methodological means of ethnography and phenomenology. The insights gained from this undertaking are used to re-theorise aspects of Steiner's writings about imagination and holistic education. In this study it is argued that imaginative teaching is made up of three modes of pedagogy and seven teaching methods, and that these modes and methods form a most potent means for connecting children with aesthetic, intellectual and physical development.

Imagination for Inclusion

The challenge is achieving a balanced pedagogical approach (Sylva et al., 2004) that supports children's agency and active learning ... but a case of drawing together playful and imaginative pedagogies with other intentional teaching ...

Author: Derek Bland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131742557X

Category: Education

Page: 216

View: 912

Imagination for Inclusion offers a reconsideration of the ways in which imagination engages and empowers learners across the education spectrum, from primary to adult levels and in all subject areas. Imagination as a natural, expedient, and exciting learning tool should be central to any approach to developing and implementing curriculum, but is increasingly undervalued as learners progress through the education system; this disregards not only imagination’s potential, but its paramount place in informing truly inclusive approaches to teaching and learning. This book presents a new theory of imagination and includes discussion about its application to teaching and learning to increase the engagement of disaffected students and reinvigorate their relationships with curriculum content. Chapters include key ideas and discussion surrounding the benefits of introducing imaginative practices into the classroom for learners from a range of marginalised backgrounds, such as young people with disabilities and adult learners from socio-economically disadvantaged environments. In exploring imagination in the practice of inclusive education, the book includes chapters from researchers and practitioners in education who have fresh ideas about how learners and teachers have benefited from introducing imaginative pedagogies. The diverse collection, featuring writers with backgrounds from early childhood to adult education, will be essential reading for academics and researchers in the fields of education, inclusive education, social policy, professional development, teacher education and creativity. It will be of particular interest to current and pre-service teachers who want to develop inclusive practice and increase the engagement of all students with formal education.

Deschooling the Imagination

I have learned many lessons about pedagogy, imagination, schooling, critical thought, and creativity in the course of writing this book. What follows is a brief synopsis of some of the most salient moments in my own evolution as a ...

Author: Eric J. Weiner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317261275

Category: Education

Page: 178

View: 545

"Deschooling the Imagination: Critical Thought as Social Practice" is, first, a book that looks at what it means to be actively engaged in developing a critical/creative mindset against the prevailing ideology of our public schools. Second, it is a book about the social/cultural relationship between what and how we learn on one hand and our imaginative capacities on the other. Finally, but equally important, it is a book about how teachers can teach in the service of a revived critical/creative imaginary. In short, you may be interested in reading this book if you are curious about examining the following questions in more depth: How can educators and those involved and/or invested in public education in the United States learn to think about curriculum, assessment, pedagogy, school structures, knowledge, power, identity, language/literacy, economics, creativity, human ecology, and our collective future in a way that escapes the over-determined discourses that inform current attitudes and practices of schooling? What are some of the tactics and strategies that teachers, students, parents, administrators, and policymakers can learn and enact in the service of a future that we can barely imagine?

Pedagogies of Social Justice in Physical Education and Youth Sport

Love is connected to hope and imagination – necessary to persevere despite barriers. ... Within a pedagogy of love, educators stimulate creativity and imagination in their learners, as well as the capacity to critique their surroundings ...

Author: Shrehan Lynch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1000551601

Category: Education

Page: 152

View: 261

This book offers an overview of contemporary debates in social justice and equity within Physical Education (PE) and Youth Sport (YS). It gives the reader clear direction on how to evaluate their current PE or YS program against current research and provides ideas for content, curriculum development, implementation, and pedagogical impact. The book addresses key contemporary issues including healthism, sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism, ableism and colonialism, and it highlights the importance of positionality and critical awareness on the part of the teacher, coach, or researcher. Presenting an array of case studies, practical examples, and thought-provoking questions, the book discusses equitable pedagogies and how they might be implemented, including in curriculum design and assessment. Concise, and avoiding academic jargon, this is an invaluable guide for pre-service and in-service teachers, teacher educators, coaches, and educators, helping them to ensure that all students and young people are included within the PE and YS settings for which they are responsible.

Pedagogy of Solidarity

Hope, Pedagogy and the Critical Imagination As an interventionist ideology the critical imagination is hopeful of change. It seeks and promotes an ideology of hope that challenges and confronts hopelessness (Freire, 1999, 8).

Author: Paulo Freire

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1611329655

Category: Education

Page: 123

View: 578

Famous Brazilian educational and social theorist Paulo Freire presents his ideas on community solidarity in moving toward social justice in schools and society in a set of talks and interviews shortly before his death, supplemented with commentaries by other well-known scholars.

Pedagogies of the Imagination

In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools. This book is about the practice of Imaginal Knowing in education.

Author: Timothy Leonard

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789048119554

Category: Education

Page: 270

View: 99

I have long admired the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies. That admiration followed from my experience as a high-school teacher of English in a wealthy suburb of New York City at the end of the 1960s. A “dream” job—I taught four classes of 15–20 students during a nine-period day—in a “dream” suburb (where I could afford to reside only by taking a room in a retired teacher’s house), many of these often Ivy-League-bound students had everything but meaningful lives. This middle-class, Midwestern young teacher was flabbergasted. In one sense, my academic life has been devoted to understanding that searing experience. Matters of meaning seemed paramount in the curriculum field to which Paul Klohr introduced me at Ohio State. Klohr assigned me the work of curriculum theorists such as James B. Macdonald. Like Timothy Leonard (who also studied with Klohr at Ohio State) and Peter Willis, Macdonald (1995) understood that school reform was part of a broader cultural and political crisis in which meaning is but one casualty. In the mythopoetic tradition in curriculum studies, scholars labor to understand this crisis and the conditions for the reconstruction of me- ing in our time, in our schools.

The Pedagogical Seminary

INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN THE IMAGINATION OF CHILDREN . 1 BY WM . H. BURNHAM . Since Kant it has been customary to distinguish between the reproductive and the productive imagination . The former merely reproduces ideally sense ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Child development

Page:

View: 231

Vols. 5-15 include "Bibliography of child study," by Louis N. Wilson.