Putin s People How the KGB Took Back Russia and then Took on the West

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER A Times and Sunday Times Book of the Year 2020 A Daily Telegraph Book of the Year 2020 ‘The Putin book that we’ve been waiting for’ Oliver Bullough, author of Moneyland

Author: Catherine Belton

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0007578806

Category: Political Science

Page: 640

View: 335

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER A Times and Sunday Times Book of the Year 2020 A Daily Telegraph Book of the Year 2020 ‘The Putin book that we’ve been waiting for’ Oliver Bullough, author of Moneyland



Change in Putin s Russia

This is the perfect introduction for undergraduates approaching Russia for the first time and those who wish to know how Russia will change during the economic crisis.

Author: Simon Pirani

Publisher: Pluto Press

ISBN: 9780745326900

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 367

Simon Pirani investigates the interaction of power, money and people in Russia during the presidencies of Vladimir Putin and his successor Dmitry Medvedev. Profiling the Putin team, including contingents from the security services and pro-market economic "reformers," Pirani argues that the economic growth it presided over during the oil boom was one-sided. The gap between rich and poor widened. Now the boom is over, inequalities will multiply further. As well as explaining Russia's economic trajectory, the book provides a unique account of the social movements that are working against an increasingly authoritarian government to change Russia for the better. This is the perfect introduction for undergraduates approaching Russia for the first time and those who wish to know how Russia will change during the economic crisis.

Putin v the People

For many ordinary Russians, their attachment to Putin is first and foremost about attachment to their community. The pride people feel in Russia's ...

Author: Samuel A. Greene

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030024505X

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 807

A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin’s grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craft a compellingly original account of contemporary Russian politics. Telling the story of Putin’s rule through pivotal episodes such as the aftermath of the "For Fair Elections" protests, the annexation of Crimea, and the War in Eastern Ukraine, Greene and Robertson draw on interviews, surveys, social media data, and leaked documents to reveal how hard Putin has to work to maintain broad popular support, while exposing the changing tactics that the Kremlin has used to bolster his popularity. Unearthing the ambitions, emotions, and divisions that fuel Russian politics, this book illuminates the crossroads to which Putin has led his country and shows why his rule is more fragile than it appears.

Politics and the Ruling Group in Putin s Russia

In the Security Council Putin's people are to be found at the deputy level. Among his presidential representatives Putin has placed FSB staff at the top of ...

Author: S. White

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230583067

Category: Political Science

Page: 173

View: 193

There is little consensus about the nature of the political system that has emerged during the Putin presidency. This collection considers the issues arising in this connection, focusing more closely on institutions such as the presidency and the security police, and on the socioeconomic dimensions of political power.

Putin v the People

Unearthing the ambitions, emotions, and divisions that fuel Russian politics, this book illuminates the crossroads to which Putin has led his country and shows why his rule is more fragile than it appears.

Author: Samuel A. Greene

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300238398

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 279

A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin's grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craft a compellingly original account of contemporary Russian politics. Telling the story of Putin's rule through pivotal episodes such as the aftermath of the "For Fair Elections" protests, the annexation of Crimea, and the War in Eastern Ukraine, Greene and Robertson draw on interviews, surveys, social media data, and leaked documents to reveal how hard Putin has to work to maintain broad popular support, while exposing the changing tactics that the Kremlin has used to bolster his popularity. Unearthing the ambitions, emotions, and divisions that fuel Russian politics, this book illuminates the crossroads to which Putin has led his country and shows why his rule is more fragile than it appears.

Vladimir Putin A Geostrategic Russian Icon A Slavic People A Russian Superpower A Charismatic World Leader The Global Upheaval Trilogy

A trilogy about Russian President Vladimir Putin based on three previously published books from 2011 until 2016. The books clarify Putin's ongoing strategy to make Russia a global power again after the dissolution of the USSR.

Author: Goeran B. Johansson

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 0359395058

Category: History

Page:

View: 739

A trilogy about Russian President Vladimir Putin based on three previously published books from 2011 until 2016. The books clarify Putin's ongoing strategy to make Russia a global power again after the dissolution of the USSR. The trilogy is based on articles by international experts and the author's own analyzes that deal with the issues in a global strategic perspective. From the chaotic Yeltsin years with a much-weakened Russia; further during the sixteen years when Vladimir Putin developed relations with China within BRICS as well as SCO; moreover, Malaysia MH 17 airliner over Eastern Ukraine. The trilogy refers to the Syrian Civil War, ISIL; the situation around the South China Sea and the Philippines; finally, in Sweden. Right up until the drama of the presidential election in the United States, the reader can get an impartial illumination of the greatest global and political-economic-military upheaval of our time. The author predicts today's global situation in a surprisingly clear way.

The Putin Paradox

Wearenowinaposition to reflecton the Putin phenomenon morebroadly, including an ... Putin's. people. and. power. Putin is one of the most traduced political ...

Author: Richard Sakwa

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1838603719

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 366

Vladimir Putin has emerged as one of the key leaders of the twenty-first century. However, he is also recognized as one of the most divisive. Abroad, his assertion of Russia's interests and critique of the western-dominated international system has brought him into conflict with Atlantic powers. Within Russia, he has balanced various factions within the elite intelligentsia alongside the wider support of Russian society. So what is the 'Putin paradox?' Richard Sakwa grapples with Putin's personal and political development on both the international political scene and within the domestic political landscape of Russia. This study historicizes the Putin paradox, through theoretical, historical and political analysis and in light of wider developments in Russian society. Richard Sakwa presents the Putin paradox as a unique regime type - balancing numerous contradictions - in order to adapt to its material environment while maintaining sufficient authority with which to shape it.

Putin s Opponents

In this book, we trace the thread of circumstances and events affecting Putin's opponents through the cameras and reporting of the Associated Press.

Author: Associated Press

Publisher: Ap Editions

ISBN: 9781633531833

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 153

View: 107

Over the past decade and a half, a growing list of Russian journalists, human rights activists, political figures, and oligarchs have ended up on the wrong side of the law, in exile, or worse. Although much remains unsolved, these Russians all seem to have one thing in common - opposition to President Vladimir Putin. In this book, we trace the thread of circumstances and events affecting Putin's opponents through the cameras and reporting of the Associated Press.

Misinterpreting Modern Russia

Bruno Sergi argues, in this new study, that the way to know the complete story behind how Putin's presidency has been viewed in Russia, is to examine closely the hard realities that conditioned Putin's policies and responses.

Author: Bruno S. Sergi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441103325

Category: Political Science

Page: 290

View: 587

When President Vladimir Putin ascended to the Kremlin at the end of the 1990s, he had to struggle with the after-effects of Boris Yeltsin's political agenda: outrageous corruption, endless social injustice, and deeply entrenched interests dating back to Gorbachev and beyond. From the outset, Putin saw his task as leveling out the political scenery. Discontent had been building up among ordinary Russians on these consequences of the dramatically unstable 1990s. Stabilization of the political system and cleaning up the widespread corruption were Putin's aims, and the Russian people supported him wholeheartedly. Many observers in the West were quick to condemn Putin and depict him as an authoritarian, dishonest leader who was still linked to the KGB. When asked why Russians were supporting the new Kremlin, many experts explained that it was a paradox that combined the country's supposed history of tyranny and its people's inclination towards it. These explanations shaped the West's understanding of modern Russia and they appear to be unshakeable in cultural circles today. Bruno Sergi argues, in this new study, that the way to know the complete story behind how Putin's presidency has been viewed in Russia, is to examine closely the hard realities that conditioned Putin's policies and responses. Misinterpreting Modern Russia: Western Views of Putin and his Presidency looks beyond the stereotypes to the hard logic of the 1990s, and asks a range of provocative questions about the disintegration of the old Soviet empire and the extraordinary riches that have caused so much opportunity and turmoil in recent years.

Putin s Totalitarian Democracy

This book studies the cultural, societal, and ideological factors absent from popular discourse on Vladimir Putin’s Russia, contesting the misleading mainstream assumption that Putin is the all-powerful sovereign of Russia.

Author: Kate C. Langdon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3030205797

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 547

This book studies the cultural, societal, and ideological factors absent from popular discourse on Vladimir Putin’s Russia, contesting the misleading mainstream assumption that Putin is the all-powerful sovereign of Russia. In carefully examining the ideological underpinnings of Putinism—its tsarist and Soviet elements, its intellectual origins, its culturally reproductive nature, and its imperialist foreign policy—the authors reveal that an indoctrinating ideology and a willing population are simultaneously the most crucial yet overlooked keys to analyzing Putin’s totalitarian democracy. Because Putinism is part of a global wave of extreme political movements, the book also reaffirms the need to understand—but not accept—how and why nation-states and masses turn to nationalism, authoritarianism, or totalitarianism in modern times.

Contemporary Russian Politics

In this new book, Neil Robinson places contemporary Russian politics in historical perspective to argue that Putin’s regime has not overcome the problems that underpinned the momentous changes in twentieth-century Russian history when the ...

Author: Neil Robinson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509525181

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 914

Vladimir Putin’s return to the Kremlin for a fourth presidential term in 2018 has seen Russian democracy weaken further and Russia’s relations with the West deteriorate seriously. Yet, within Russia, Putin’s position remains unchallenged and his foreign policy battles have received widespread public support. But is Putin as safe as his approval ratings lead us to believe? And how secure is the regime that he heads? In this new book, Neil Robinson places contemporary Russian politics in historical perspective to argue that Putin’s regime has not overcome the problems that underpinned the momentous changes in twentieth-century Russian history when the country veered from tsarism to Soviet rule to post-communist chaos. The first part of the book, outlining why crises have been perennial problems for Russia, is followed by an exploration of contemporary Russian political institutions and policy to show how Putin has stabilised Russian politics. But, while Putin’s achievements as a politician have been considerable in strengthening his personal position, they have not dealt successfully with the enduring problem of the Russian state’s functionality. Like other Russian rulers, Putin has been much better at establishing a political system that supports his rule than he has at building up a state that can deliver material wealth and protection to the Russian people. As a result, Robinson argues, Russia has been and remains vulnerable to political crisis and regime change.

Vladimir Putin and Russia s Imperial Revival

Putin's people (August 25). 384 (8543): 5. Economist. 2007b. The making of a neo-KGB state (August 25). 384 (8543): 25–28. Economist. 2014.

Author: David E. McNabb

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 149877749X

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 109

Discerning the early stages of the rebirth of a new Russian empire from the ashes of the Soviet Union, Vladimir Putin and Russia’s Imperial Revival argues that Russia’s recent overtly aggressive actions and foreign policy doctrines have signaled a renewal of the Cold War. At the least, Russia’s actions represent the potential for renewal. This book explains these developments in a historical context. The book begins by describing Russia’s initial policy of rapprochement after the collapse of the Soviet Union and its development into a foreign policy of threatened or actual armed aggression. It identifies today’s Russia as a nation determined to re-establish itself as a political and military force. As a prominent figure in the development and continuation of its current foreign policy, Vladimir Putin plays a central role in the topics covered. Previous literature often treats Putin as an individual phenomenon examining his connections to corruption or the secret police, but here David E. McNabb examines him as the latest in a long history of Russian despots who followed similar expansionist policies. He details some of the tactics Putin uses to instill fear and dominate political policies of republics newly independent from Russia. These tactics include the use of energy as a weapon, cyber terrorism, and military support for ethnic Russian separatists in other sovereign nations, most recently exemplified by Russia’s annexation of Crimea from Ukraine via armed invasion. In an attempt to demystify Russia’s re-emergence as an international political force, Vladimir Putin and Russia’s Imperial Revival grounds its analyses in history. It explores as far back as the establishment of the first Russian empire, and regards Putin as a leader determined to establish a fifth imperial incarnation. It provides a nuanced understanding of how Russia arrived at its current position through recent and distant internal and international events.

Putin Country

Far from the glitz of Moscow, the people of Chelyabinsk were working out their country’s destiny, person by person. In Putin Country, Garrels crafts an intimate portrait of Middle Russia.

Author: Anne Garrels

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374710430

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 806

Short-listed for the Pushkin House Russian Book Prize More than twenty years ago, the NPR correspondent Anne Garrels first visited Chelyabinsk, a gritty military-industrial center a thousand miles east of Moscow. The longtime home of the Soviet nuclear program, the Chelyabinsk region contained beautiful lakes, shuttered factories, mysterious closed cities, and some of the most polluted places on earth. Garrels’s goal was to chart the aftershocks of the U.S.S.R.’s collapse by traveling to Russia’s heartland. Returning again and again, Garrels found that the area’s new freedoms and opportunities were exciting but also traumatic. As the economic collapse of the early 1990s abated, the city of Chelyabinsk became richer and more cosmopolitan, even as official corruption and intolerance for minorities grew more entrenched. Sushi restaurants proliferated; so did shakedowns. In the neighboring countryside, villages crumbled into the ground. Far from the glitz of Moscow, the people of Chelyabinsk were working out their country’s destiny, person by person. In Putin Country, Garrels crafts an intimate portrait of Middle Russia. We meet upwardly mobile professionals, impassioned activists who champion the rights of orphans and disabled children, and ostentatious mafiosi. We discover surprising subcultures, such as a vibrant underground gay community and a circle of determined Protestant evangelicals. And we watch doctors and teachers trying to cope with inescapable payoffs and institutionalized negligence. As Vladimir Putin tightens his grip on power and war in Ukraine leads to Western sanctions and a lower standard of living, the local population mingles belligerent nationalism with a deep ambivalence about their country’s direction. Through it all, Garrels sympathetically charts an ongoing identity crisis. In the aftermath of the Soviet Union, what is Russia? What kind of pride and cohesion can it offer? Drawing on close friendships sustained over many years, Garrels explains why Putin commands the loyalty of so many Russians, even those who decry the abuses of power they regularly encounter. Correcting the misconceptions of Putin’s supporters and critics alike, Garrels’s portrait of Russia’s silent majority is both essential and engaging reading at a time when cold war tensions are resurgent.

Protest in Putin s Russia

As the first full-length study of the Russian protests, this book will be of great value to students and scholars of Russia and to anyone interested in contemporary social movements and political protest.

Author: Mischa Gabowitsch

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745696295

Category: Political Science

Page: 300

View: 712

The Russian protests, sparked by the 2011 Duma election, have been widely portrayed as a colourful but inconsequential middle-class rebellion, confined to Moscow and organized by an unpopular opposition. In this sweeping new account of the protests, Mischa Gabowitsch challenges these journalistic clichés, showing that they stem from wishful thinking and media bias rather than from accurate empirical analysis. Drawing on a rich body of material, he analyses the biggest wave of demonstrations since the end of the Soviet Union, situating them in the context of protest and social movements across Russia as a whole. He also explores the legacy of the protests in the new era after Ukraine's much larger Maidan protests, the crises in Crimea and the Donbass, and Putin's ultra-conservative turn. As the first full-length study of the Russian protests, this book will be of great value to students and scholars of Russia and to anyone interested in contemporary social movements and political protest.

The Terrarium

The novel traces his transformation from a child, who enjoys chasing rats in the stairwell of his dilapidated apartment building, to the omnipotent leader, who builds a terrarium in his Residence, where he keeps a dozen vipers captured on a ...

Author: David Guy

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781482705041

Category: Fiction

Page: 330

View: 963

The Terrarium uncovers the hidden demons of Russia's President Vladimir Putin - and reveals the secret, often shadowy, aspects of his life. Putin's sensational story unfolds in a whimsical synthesis of realistic elements and dystopian ones - the phantasmagorical, grotesque and satirical - a style that is singularly suitable to the distorted realities of Putin's reign. The action takes place in the imaginary country of Slavishia, a land that is unmistakably Russia, although its name also amalgamates the elements of Slav and slavish. The protagonist - whose abbreviated name VVP, signifying Vigilant Vindictive Potentate or V.V. Putin, people utter only in fearful whispers - is revealed dynamically through a plot that moves about freely in time and space. The novel traces his transformation from a child, who enjoys chasing rats in the stairwell of his dilapidated apartment building, to the omnipotent leader, who builds a terrarium in his Residence, where he keeps a dozen vipers captured on a hunt. In the course of his evolution, he studies at the university, offers his services to the infamous KGB, and becomes an intelligence officer in what was then East Germany. There, he fathers a son out-of-wedlock, and pays the young man off when years later the son files a lawsuit to shake his "dad" down for money. Upon Putin's return from Germany, this anonymous petty officer rapidly becomes a lead figure in the administration of the Mayor of Slavishia's second most important city - where he distinguishes himself by feeding the starving population with dog food - and then a ruler tormented by nightmares in which he converses with the devil. Though the crux of the plot is VVP's vertiginous ascent to power, we see him too as an ardent lover, who ultimately weds a charming young gymnast and as a merciless crusader against the opposition - a man who mistrusts and fears the West, as is blatantly apparent during his conversation with the American President. In the spring of 2017, the protagonist dies in a helicopter crash, and Slavishia is plunged into chaos. The prices of oil and gas fall precipitously, a financial crisis devastates the country, and its people take to the streets and rebel. The reenergized opposition clamors for fair elections coupled with a Constitutional Amendment to limit the new president's authority, aiming to transform Slavishia into a democratic republic modeled on the western prototype. It is at this precise moment that VVP's clone enters the political arena... What will happen next? Will Slavishia develop into a true democracy or will it be doomed to repeat its recent history, enslaving itself to yet another dictator? David Guy is a New York-based journalist and writer with a substantial body of work authored both in his native Russia and since his arrival in the United States in 1993. Over the course of 30 years, Mr. Guy worked in a variety of roles for a popular Moscow newspaper. He has since served as editor-in-chief of several weekly American-Russian newspapers, and he currently serves as executive editor of the international literary journal Time and Place. He also makes regular appearances on the premier Russian-language cable channel RTN's "Press Club." Mr. Guy has written more than twenty novels. Among his works to receive the broadest recognition are Goodbye, Eternal Friend about Dostoyevsky's love affair; Happy Birthday and Bodyguard; Invasion, a documentary about the Soviet war in Afghanistan; and a history of the life, struggle and demise of the Minsk ghetto during World War II, recently released in English under the title Innocence in Hell. His most recent books to be released in Russia include the novels Jackpot and The Subjunctive; Sky Gravity, a collection of essays about airplane construction; and While the World Turns, a 750-page saga following two branches of a family as they grow and intertwine over the span of a hundred years and two continents.

Putin vs Putin

This fascinating book, written by an informal advisor to Putin and a Kremlin insider, is the first of its kind in English.

Author: Alexander Dugin

Publisher: Arktos

ISBN: 1910524115

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 444

According to Prof Alexander Dugin, Vladimir Putin stands at a crossroads. Throughout his career as the President of Russia, Putin has attempted to balance two opposing sides of his political nature: one side is a liberal democrat who seeks to adopt Western-style reforms in Russia and maintain good relations with the United States and Europe, and the other is a Russian patriot who wishes to preserve Russia's traditions and reassert her role as one of the great powers of the world. According to Dugin, this balancing act cannot go on if Putin wishes to enjoy continuing popular support among the Russian people. Putin must act to preserve Russia's unique identity and sovereignty in the face of increasing challenges, both from Russian liberals at home and from foreign powers. Russia is no longer strong enough to stand on her own, he writes. In order to do this, Russia must cooperate with other dissenting powers who oppose the new globalist order of liberalism to bring about a multipolar world, in which no single nation wields supreme power, but rather several major powers keep each other in balance. Russia is crucial to this effort, in Dugin's view, and indeed, its own survival as a unique and independent civilisation is dependent on a geopolitical shift away from the unipolar world represented by America's unchecked supremacy. This fascinating book, written by an informal advisor to Putin and a Kremlin insider, is the first of its kind in English.

In Putin s Footsteps

In Putin’s Footsteps is Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler’s unique combination of travelogue, current affairs, and history, showing how Russia’s dimensions have shaped its identity and culture through the decades.

Author: Nina Khrushcheva

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250163242

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 646

In Putin’s Footsteps is Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler’s unique combination of travelogue, current affairs, and history, showing how Russia’s dimensions have shaped its identity and culture through the decades. With exclusive insider status as Nikita Khrushchev’s great grand-daughter, and an ex-pat living and reporting on Russia and the Soviet Union since 1993, Nina Khrushcheva and Jeffrey Tayler offer a poignant exploration of the largest country on earth through their recreation of Vladimir Putin’s fabled New Year’s Eve speech planned across all eleven time zones. After taking over from Yeltsin in 1999, and then being elected president in a landslide, Putin traveled to almost two dozen countries and a quarter of Russia’s eighty-nine regions to connect with ordinary Russians. His travels inspired the idea of a rousing New Year’s Eve address delivered every hour at midnight throughout Russia’s eleven time zones. The idea was beautiful, but quickly abandoned as an impossible feat. He correctly intuited, however, that the success of his presidency would rest on how the country’s outback citizens viewed their place on the world stage. Today more than ever, Putin is even more determined to present Russia as a formidable nation. We need to understand why Russia has for centuries been an adversary of the West. Its size, nuclear arsenal, arms industry, and scientific community (including cyber-experts), guarantees its influence.

Russia as a Great Power

Dimensions of Security Under Putin Jakob Hedenskog, Vilhelm Konnander, Bertil Nygren, ... who have turned into 'Putin's people', should shed their habitual ...

Author: Jakob Hedenskog

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134239165

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 299

After a period of relative weakness and isolation during most of the 1990s, Russia is again appearing as a major security player in world politics. This book provides a comprehensive assessment of Russia's current security situation, addressing such questions as: What kind of player is Russia in the field of security? What is the essence of its security policy? What are the sources, capabilities and priorities of its security policy? What are the prospects for the future? One important conclusion to emerge is that, while Russian foreign policy under Putin has become more pragmatic and responsive to both problems and opportunities, the growing lack of checks and balances in domestic politics makes political integration with the West difficult and gives the president great freedom in applying Russia's growing power abroad.