Sh gun

After John Blackthorne shipwrecks in Japan, he makes himself useful to a feudal lord in a power struggle with another and becomes a samurai.

Author: James Clavell

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton Limited

ISBN: 9780340766163

Category: British

Page: 1125

View: 580

This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan. Both entertaining and incisive, SHOGUN is a stunningly dramatic re-creation of a very different world. Starting with his shipwreck on this most alien of shores, the novel charts Blackthorne's rise from the status of reviled foreigner up to the heights of trusted advisor and eventually, Samurai. All as civil war looms over the fragile country.

Shogun

. . Get it, read it, you'll enjoy it mightily' Daily Mirror This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan.

Author: James Clavell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1848943121

Category: Fiction

Page: 1136

View: 468

'Clavell never puts a foot wrong . . . Get it, read it, you'll enjoy it mightily' Daily Mirror This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan. Both entertaining and incisive, SHOGUN is a stunningly dramatic re-creation of a very different world. Starting with his shipwreck on this most alien of shores, the novel charts Blackthorne's rise from the status of reviled foreigner up to the hights of trusted advisor and eventually, Samurai. All as civil war looms over the fragile country. 'I can't remember when a novel has seized my mind like this one. It's irresistable, maybe unforgettable. Clavell creates a world so enveloping you forget who and where you are' - New York Times

Shinsengumi

Shinsengumi: The Shogun's Last Samurai Corps is the true story of the notorious samurai corps formed in 1863 to arrest or kill the enemies of the Tokugawa Shogun.

Author: Romulus Hillsborough

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 146291358X

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 854

Shinsengumi: The Shogun's last Samurai Corps is the true story of the notorious samurai corps formed in 1863 to arrest or kill the enemies of the Tokugawa Shogun. The only book in English about the Shinsengumi, it focuses on the corps' two charismatic leaders, Kondo Isami and Hijikata Toshizo, both impeccable swordsmen. It is a history–in–brief of the final years of the Bakufu, which collapsed in 1867 with the restoration of Imperial rule. In writing Shinsengumi, Hillsborough referred mostly to Japanese–language primary sources, including letters, memoirs, journals, interviews, and eyewitness accounts, as well as definitive biographies and histories of the era. The fall of the shogun's government (Tokugawa Bakufu, or simply Bakufu) in 1868, which had ruled Japan for over two and a half centuries, was the greatest event in modern Japanese history. The revolution, known as the Meiji Restoration, began with the violent reaction of samurai to the Bakufu's decision in 1854 to open the theretofore isolated country to "Western barbarians." Though opening the country was unavoidable, it was seen as a sign of weakness by the samurai who clamored to "expel the barbarians." Those samurai plotted to overthrow the shogun and restore the holy emperor to his ancient seat of power. Screaming "heaven's revenge," they wielded their swords with a vengeance upon those loyal to the shogun. They unleashed a wave of terror at the center of the revolution—the emperor's capital of Kyoto. Murder and assassination were rampant. By the end of 1862, hordes of renegade samurai, called ronin, had transformed the streets of the Imperial Capital into a "sea of blood." The shogun's administrators were desperate to stop the terror. A band of expert swordsmen was formed. It was given the name Shinsengumi ("Newly Selected Corps")—and commissioned to eliminate the ronin and other enemies of the Bakufu. With unrestrained brutality bolstered by an official sanction to kill, the Shinsengumi soon became the shogun's most dreaded security force. In this vivid historical narrative of the Shinsengumi, the only one in the English language, author Romulus Hillsborough paints a provocative and thrilling picture of this most fascinating period in Japanese history.

Stranger in the Shogun s City

"A vivid, deeply researched work of history that explores the life of an unconventional woman during the first half of the 19th century in Edo-the city that would become Tokyo-and a portrait of a great city on the brink of a momentous ...

Author: Amy Stanley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501188534

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 193

"A vivid, deeply researched work of history that explores the life of an unconventional woman during the first half of the 19th century in Edo-the city that would become Tokyo-and a portrait of a great city on the brink of a momentous encounter with the West."--

The Shogun s Queen

'A persuasive storyteller and the setting is mesmerising' Antonia Senior, The Times _________________ The year is 1853, and a young Japanese girl’s world is about to be turned upside down.

Author: Lesley Downer

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 144815247X

Category: Fiction

Page: 544

View: 245

'A persuasive storyteller and the setting is mesmerising' Antonia Senior, The Times _________________ The year is 1853, and a young Japanese girl’s world is about to be turned upside down. When black ships carrying barbarians arrive on the shores of Japan, the Satsuma clan’s way of life is threatened. But it’s not just the samurai who must come together to fight: the beautiful, headstrong Okatsu is also given a new destiny by her feudal lord – to save the realm. Armed only with a new name, Princess Atsu, as she is now known, journeys to the women’s palace of Edo Castle, a place so secret it cannot be marked on any map. Behind the palace’s immaculate façade, amid rumours of murder and whispers of ghosts, Atsu must uncover the mystery that surrounds the man whose fate, it seems, is irrevocably linked to hers – the shogun himself – if she is to rescue her people . . .

The Shogun s Daughter

Shying away from Yoshisato, the shogun said, “The problem is . . . Lately I've, ahh, begun to wonder if you're, ahh, really my son.” “Of course I'm your son!” Yoshisato looked so anxious that Yanagisawa winced. Fearful of being punished ...

Author: Laura Joh Rowland

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1250028620

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 778

Japan, 1704. In an elegant mansion a young woman named Tsuruhime lies on her deathbed, attended by her nurse. Smallpox pustules cover her face. Incense burns, to banish the evil spirits of disease. After Tsuruhime takes her last breath, the old woman watching from the doorway says, "Who's going to tell the Shogun his daughter is dead?" The death of the Shogun's daughter has immediate consequences on his regime. There will be no grandchild to leave the kingdom. Faced with his own mortality and beset by troubles caused by the recent earthquake, he names as his heir Yoshisato, the seventeen-year-old son he only recently discovered was his. Until five months ago, Yoshisato was raised as the illegitimate son of Yanagisawa, the shogun's favorite advisor. Yanagisawa is also the longtime enemy of Sano Ichiro. Sano doubts that Yoshisato is really the Shogun's son, believing it's more likely a power-play by Yanagisawa. When Sano learns that Tsuruhime's death may have been a murder, he sets off on a dangerous investigation that leads to more death and destruction as he struggles to keep his pregnant wife, Reiko, and his son safe. Instead, he and his family become the accused. And this time, they may not survive the day. Laura Joh Rowland's thrilling series set in Feudal Japan is as gripping and entertaining as ever.

The Shogun s Daughter

“The geisha, my lord—To the Shogun! Demand that Gengo drink this sake!” I bent forward to whisper a question: “You suspect poison?” “Not alone for my lord! Hasten! I fear the worst! Keiki and Midzuano—Gengo the tool—” But I was already ...

Author: Robert Ames Bennet

Publisher: A. C. McCLURG & CO.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 166

View: 624

Example in this ebook CHAPTER I—Eastern Seas My first cruise as a midshipman in the navy of the United States began a short month too late for me to share in the honors of the Mexican War. In other words, I came in at the foot of the service, with all the grades above me fresh-stocked with comparatively young and vigorous officers. As a consequence, the rate of promotion was so slow that the Summer of 1851 found me, at the age of twenty-four, still a middie, with my lieutenancy ever receding, like a will-o’-the-wisp, into the future. Had I chosen a naval career through necessity, I might have continued to endure. But to the equal though younger heir of one of the largest plantations in South Carolina, the pay of even a post captain would have been of small concern. It is, therefore, hardly necessary to add that I had been lured into the service by the hope of winning fame and glory. That my choice should have fallen upon the navy rather than the army may have been due to the impulse of heredity. According to family traditions and records, one of my ancestors was the famous English seaman Will Adams, who served Queen Elizabeth in the glorious fight against the Spanish Armada and afterwards piloted a Dutch ship through the dangerous Straits of Magellan and across the vast unchartered expanse of the Pacific to the mysterious island empire, then known as Cipango or Zipangu. History itself verifies that wonderful voyage and the still more wonderful fact of my ancestor’s life among the Japanese as one of the nobles and chief counsellors of the great Emperor Iyeyasu. So highly was the advice of the bold Englishman esteemed by the Emperor that he was never permitted to return home. For many years he dwelt honorably among that most peculiar of Oriental peoples, aiding freely the few English and Dutch who ventured into the remote Eastern seas. He had aided even the fanatical Portuguese and Spaniards, who, upon his arrival, had sought to have him and his handful of sick and starving shipmates executed as pirates. So it was he lived and died a Japanese noble, and was buried with all honor. With the blood of such a man in my veins, it is not strange that I turned to the sea. Yet it is no less strange that three years in the service should bring me to an utter weariness of the dull naval routine. Notable as were the achievements of our navy throughout the world in respect to exploration and other peaceful triumphs, it has ever surprised me that in the absence of war and promotion I should have lingered so long in my inferior position. In war the humiliation of servitude to seniority may be thrust from thought by the hope of winning superior rank through merit. Deprived of this opportunity, I could not but chafe under my galling subjection to the commands of men never more than my equals in social rank and far too often my inferiors. The climax came after a year on the China Station, to which I had obtained an assignment in the hope of renewed action against the arrogant Celestials. Disappointed in this, and depressed by a severe spell of fever contracted at Honkong, I resigned the service at Shanghai, and took passage for New York, by way of San Francisco and the Horn, on the American clipper Sea Flight. We cleared for the Sandwich Islands August the twenty-first, 1851. The second noon found us safe across the treacherous bars of the Yangtse-Kiang and headed out across the Eastern Sea, the southwest monsoon bowling us along at a round twelve knots. To be continue in this ebook

Ooku the Secret World of the Shogun s Women

the ceremonious and watchful otoshiyori and female staff in the Ōoku.5 Everyone, even the shogun, was obliged to follow certain Ōoku regulations and procedures that had been developed over the decades. Some willful shogun, like Iemitsu ...

Author: Cecilia Segawa Seigle

Publisher: Cambria Press

ISBN: 1604978724

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 374

View: 243

"One of the least understood and often maligned aspects of the Tokugawa Shogunate is the Ooku, or 'Great Interior,' the institution within the shogun's palace, administered by and for the upper-class shogunal women and their attendants who resided there. Long the object of titillation and a favorite subject for off-the-wall fantasy in historical TV and film dramas, the actual daily life, practices, cultural roles, and ultimate missions of these women have remained largely in the dark, except for occasional explosions of scandal. In crystal-clear prose that is a pleasure to read, this new book, however, presents the Ooku in a whole new down-to-earth, practical light. After many years of perusing unexamined Ooku documents generated by these women and their associates, the authors have provided not only an overview of the fifteen generations of Shoguns whose lives were lived in residence with this institution, but how shoguns interacted differently with it. Much like recent research on imperial convents, they find not a huddled herd of oppressed women, but on the contrary, women highly motivated to the preservation of their own particular cultural institution. Most important, they have been able to identify "the culture of secrecy" within the Ooku itself to be an important mechanism for preserving the highest value, 'loyalty,' that essential value to their overall self-interested mission dedicated to the survival of the Shogunate itself." - Barbara Ruch, Columbia University "The aura of power and prestige of the institution known as the ooku-the complex network of women related to the shogun and their living quarters deep within Edo castle-has been a popular subject of Japanese television dramas and movies. Brushing aside myths and fallacies that have long obscured our understanding, this thoroughly researched book provides an intimate look at the lives of the elite female residents of the shogun's elaborate compound. Drawing information from contemporary diaries and other private memoirs, as well as official records, the book gives detailed descriptions of the physical layout of their living quarters, regulations, customs, and even clothing, enabling us to actually visualize this walled-in world that was off limits for most of Japanese society. It also outlines the complex hierarchy of positions, and by shining a light on specific women, gives readers insight into the various factions within the ooku and the scandals that occasionally occurred. Both positive and negative aspects of life in the "great interior" are represented, and one learns how some of these high-ranking women wielded tremendous social as well as political power, at times influencing the decision-making of the ruling shoguns. In sum, this book is the most accurate overview and characterization of the ooku to date, revealing how it developed and changed during the two and a half centuries of Tokugawa rule. A treasure trove of information, it will be a vital source for scholars and students of Japan studies, as well as women's studies, and for general readers who are interested in learning more about this fascinating women's institution and its significance in Japanese history and culture." - Patricia Fister, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto

Shogun s Painted Culture

Above this echelon was a bicephalic royalty , one half of the hydra being the shogun ( properly shögun ) , whose office , since 1603 , had been passed on by heredity in the house of Tokugawa and whose capital was Edo ( modern Tokyo ) .

Author: Timon Screech

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781861890641

Category: Art

Page: 311

View: 279

In this penetrating analysis of a little-explored area of Japanese cultural history, Timon Screech reassesses the career of the chief minister Matsudaira Sadanobu, who played a key role in defining what we think of as Japanese culture today. Aware of how visual representations could support or undermine regimes, Sadanobu promoted painting to advance his own political aims and improve the shogunate's image. As an antidote to the hedonistic ukiyo-e, or floating world, tradition, which he opposed, Sadanobu supported attempts to construct a new approach to painting modern life. At the same time, he sought to revive historical and literary painting, favouring such artists as the flamboyant, innovative Maruyama Okyo. After the city of Kyoto was destroyed by fire in 1788, its reconstruction provided the stage for the renewal of Japan's iconography of power, the consummation of the 'shogun's painted culture'. “Screech’s ideas are fascinating, often brilliant, and well grounded. . . . [Shogun’s Painted Culture] presents a thorough analysis of aspects of the early modern Japanese world rarely observed in such detail and never before treated to such an eloquent handling in the English language.”—CAA Reviews “[A] stylishly written and provocative cultural history.”—Monumenta Nipponica “As in his admirable Sex and the Floating World: Erotic Images in Japan 1700-1820, Screech lavishes learning and scholarly precision, but remains colloquial in thought and eminently readable.”—Japan Times Timon Screech is Senior Lecturer in the history of Japanese art at SOAS, University of London, and Senior Research Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. He is the author of several books on Japanese history and culture, including Sex and the Floating World: Erotic Images in Japan 1700–1820 (Reaktion, 1999).

Stranger in the Shogun s City

trinkets back as souvenirs.27 But for most, the building itself was a kind of abstraction, much like the shogun, who never appeared in public. There were rumours, but no one could say for certain what he looked like or how he sounded.

Author: Amy Stanley

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473554357

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 459

Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize 2020, a vivid work of history that explores the life of an unconventional woman in Edo - now known as Tokyo - and a portrait of a great city on the brink of momentous change 'Compelling... Deeply absorbing' Guardian The daughter of a Buddhist priest, Tsuneno was born in 1804 in a village in Japan's snow country and was expected to lead a life much like her mother's. Instead - after three divorces and with a temperament much too strong-willed for her family's approval - she ran away to follow her own path in Edo, the city we now call Tokyo. Stranger in the Shogun's City is a rare, captivating portrait of one woman as she endeavours to recreate herself and her life, and provides a window into the drama and excitement of Japan at a pivotal moment in history. 'Marvellous... Stanley builds up a picture of Tsuneno's world, immersing us in an experience akin to time travel' TLS * Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography 2020 * * Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Biography 2021 * * Winner of the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography *

Shogun s Scroll

This scroll should be used as a guide for personal progress through life, although it should be understood by the reader that certain ideas presented to the shogun in the twelfth century do not pertain to contemporary life and society ...

Author: Stephen F. Kaufman

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462907830

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 429

The Shogun's Scroll offers a look at the samurai strategies and ethics of medieval Japan distilled into language modern readers can relate to and follow. In the tradition of The Art of War and The Book of Five Rings, this book offers timeless advice on success in war and life. Written in the voice of Hidetomo Nakadai, a late twelfth century scholar and servant in the court of Minamoto Yoritomo—the first shogun of Japan and one of the world's most ruthless generals—this treatise can be used as a guide for personal growth and motivation. The author draws on a lifetime of personal experiences with the philosophy of Japanese martial arts as well as countless historical sources to produce this profound work of docu-fiction. It is essential reading for those interested in martial arts, samurai, military history or Japanese history.

The Shogun s Last Samurai Corps

Matsudaira Chikaranosuké,5 chief fencing instructor at the Bakufu's Military Academy in Edo and close relative of the shōgun. Matsudaira's intentions included reining in the radical elements in and around Edo who threatened the Bakufu.

Author: Romulus Hillsborough

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462922082

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 527

"Power to them meant everything. It was founded on courage, which begot honor. And by this courage and for this honor they fought to the death." The Shogun's Last Samurai Corps tells the thrilling story of the Shinsengumi—the legendary corps of Samurai warriors tasked with keeping order in Kyoto during the final chaotic years of the Tokugawa Shogunate (1600–1868). This book recounts the fascinating tales of political intrigue, murder and mayhem surrounding the fearsome Shinsengumi, including: The infamous slaughter at Ikidaya Inn where, after learning of a plan to torch the city, a group of Shinsengumi viciously attacked and killed a group of anti-Tokugawa plotters The bloody assassination of Serizawa Kamo, the Shinsengumi leader, under highly suspicious circumstances The final tumultuous battles of the civil war in which the Shinsengumi fought and died in a series of doomed last stands Author and Samurai history expert Romulus Hillsborough uses letters, memoirs, interviews and eyewitness accounts to paint a vivid picture of the Shinsengumi, their origins, violent methods and the colorful characters that led the group.

The Shogun s Silver Telescope

... 92–93 , 194–195 , 199–203 , 210–215 , 222 Timon of Athens 83-84 Timur ( Tamberlaine ) 113-115 , 197 Titian ( Tiziano Vecelli ) 117 tobacco 59 Tokugawa Hidetada ( 2nd shogun ) 9-10 , 12 , 94 , 153-156 , 175 , 178–179 , 185 , 187–188 ...

Author: Timon Screech

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198832036

Category: Art

Page: 336

View: 826

The East India Company, founded in London in 1600, was the world's biggest trading organization until the twentieth century. It was originally a spice trading organization, and its existence was precarious in its early years. But its governors soon began to think bigger. A decade after itsfoundation, they started to plan voyages to more fabulous places, notably Japan. Japan had silver, was cold in winter, and had no sheep, so was a perfect market for England's main export, woollen cloth. The Company planned to add to its spice-runs, sailing back and forth to Japan, exchanging woolfor silver. This could be done quickly and easily, over the top of Russia - or so the maps of the day suggested (these same maps also showed Japan twenty times too large, about the size of India).Knowing the Spanish and Portuguese had got there before them, the Company prepared a special present to impress and win over their Japanese hosts. They chose as their first gift a silver telescope. The expedition carrying the telescope departed in 1611, and the Shogun was finally presented with thetelescope in the name of King James I in 1613. It was the first telescope ever to leave Europe, and the first made as a presentation item. Before this voyage had even returned, the Company had dispatched another with an equally stunning cargo: nearly a hundred oil paintings.This is the story of these two extraordinary cargoes: what they meant for the fortunes of the Company, what the choice of them says about the seventeenth century England from which they came, and what effect they had on the quizzical Asian rulers to whom they were given.

The Court Journey to the Sh gun of Japan

Author: Jan Cock Blomhoff

Publisher: Koninklijk Instituut Voor De tropen

ISBN: 9789074822183

Category: History

Page: 133

View: 387

The Dutch Director or "Opperhoofd" of Deshima was required to make an annual journey to the shogun’s court in Edo (present-day Tokyo). Opperhoofd Jan Cock Blomhoff (1779-1853) made his first journey to Edo in 1818. In addition to the official diary he kept during this journey, Blomhoff also maintained correspondence with his wife Titia in Holland. This hitherto unpublished material is a major source of knowledge on Tokugawa Japan. It offers details about Blomhoff's travels and contains numerous references to the objects he acquired. Many of these pieces are reproduced in the book, along with other documents, such as maps. (See also the publication "Titia - The First Western Woman in Japan")

Shogun Iemitsu

A must-read for anyone who enjoyed James Clavell's Shogun. Shogun Iemitsu will thrill beyond your wildest expectations!

Author: Michael R. Zomber

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 144015564X

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 368

Rising from the fragrant, soothing water, Hideo allowed the liquid to stream down his face. His long hair trailed down his well-muscled neck in a satisfying weighty mass. Wiping his eyes and completely relaxed, Hideo looked first at the swords on the stand nearest him and then fell into a reverie. His earliest childhood memory was not of his beloved mother but of his fathers swords. The ritual was invariable. Before his father would kiss his mother, before his father would greet or dandle him, the man who had had the courage and audacity to marry the daughter of one of the Dictator Odas concubines removed his sandals with great care and walked to the black lacquer, double sword stand and, employing ever greater care, first removed the long sword from his sash and then the shorter sword. Each was positioned with incredible accuracy so that the handle and guard were outside of the cradle formed by the arms of the stand. The long sword was always placed above the shorter one. Their graceful curves, shining black lacquer scabbards, and silk-wrapped grips fascinated Hideo. They were so intimately associated with his fathera kindly but serious man of few words. Shogun Iemitsu chronicles a day in the life of two young samurai, Hideo and Kobiyashi, as they attend a festival, fall in love, and put down a rebellion against the Tokugawa government that changes their lives forever. Shogun Iemitsu is based entirely on historical events, and it is filled with breathtaking details of life under the Shoguns. A must-read for anyone who enjoyed James Clavell's Shogun. Shogun Iemitsu will thrill beyond your wildest expectations!

The Shogun s Silver Telescope and the Cargo of the New Year s Gift

Downton was to sail from India to Japan , so the New Year's Gift should rightfully have contained a set of royal portraits to present at the shogun's court . None are listed . It is probable , as noted above , that Saris took a portrait ...

Author: Timon Screech

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192568027

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 991

The East India Company, founded in London in 1600, was originally a spice trading organisation. But its governors soon began to think bigger. After a decade, they started to plan voyages to more fabulous places, notably India and Japan. Rich in silver, Japan was a desirable trading partner; crucially, it was also cold in winter. England's main export was woollen cloth, which would not sell in hot places, so the Company envisaged adding to its spice runs by sailing back and forth to Japan, exchanging wool for silver. Maps suggested that this could be done quickly, above Russian. But these maps also made Japan twenty times too large, the size of India in fact. Knowing the Spanish and Portuguese had preceded them, the Company prepared a special present for its first extended sailing to India and Japan. In the end, the Company missed India, but got to Japan in 1613. The Shogun, the military dictator of Japan, was presented with a silver telescope in the name of King James. It was the first telescope ever to leave Europe and the first made as a presentation item. Before this initial ship had even returned, the Company dispatched another, named the New Year's Gift, with an equally stunning cargo: almost 100 oil paintings. These would be given and sold to the Indian and Japanese courts. This book looks at the formation and history of the Company, but mostly examines the meaning of these two extraordinary cargoes. What were they supposed to mean, and what effect did they have on quizzical Asian rulers?

Shogun

This book tells the fascinating history of the life of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu — Japan's most famous Shogun.

Author: A. L. Sadler

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 9784805310427

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 512

This book tells the fascinating history of the life of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu — Japan's most famous Shogun. Since its initial appearance, A.L.Sadler's imposing biography of the Japanese Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu has been recognized as an outstanding contribution to the knowledge of Japanese history. It is also considered the standard reference work on the period that saw the entrenchment of feudalism in Japan and the opening of some two and a half centuries of rigid isolation from the rest of the world. In the course of Japanese history, there have been five great military leaders who by common consent stand out above the others of their type. Of these, two lived in the twelfth century, while the other three, Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu, were contemporary in the latter half of the sixteenth century. The last of these three, with whose life Mr. Sadler deals, may well be described as having perfected the shogunate system. Not only did Ieyasu found a dynasty of rulers and organize a powerful system of government, but also he rounded off his achievements by contriving before his death to arrange for his deification afterward. As Mr. Sadler notes, "Tokugawa Ieyasu is unquestionably one of the greatest men the world has yet seen," and this fascinating account of Ieyasu's life and times is presented in a thoroughly absorbing narrative in which dramatic highlights abound. Japan's feudal age came to a close in 1868 with the downfall of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the restoration of the Emperor to political power. The event marked the end of the powerful regime that Ieyasu established at the beginning of the seventeenth century. That it did not at the same time mark the eclipse of Ieyasu's greatness is sufficient testimony to the major role he played in his country's history. It is to A. L. Sadler's lasting credit that he has brought this eminent but often ruthless military leader so vividly to life.

The Company and the Shogun

The first book to treat the Dutch East India Company as more than a commercial enterprise, this text offers unprecedented perspective on one of the most important, long-lasting unions between an Asian state and a European overseas ...

Author: Adam Clulow

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231164289

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 939

The Dutch East India Company was a unique, hybrid organization acting as both company and state, aggressively intervening in Asian political matters in which it had no place. This study focuses on the company’s clashes with Tokugawa Japan in the seventeenth century, particularly in the areas of diplomacy, sovereignty, and violence. In each encounter, the Dutch were forced to abandon claims to sovereign powers and refashion themselves—from subjects of a fictive king to loyal vassals of the shogun, from aggressive pirates to meek merchants, and from insistent defenders of colonial rule to legal subjects of the Tokugawa state. The first book to treat the Dutch East India Company as more than a commercial enterprise, this text offers unprecedented perspective on one of the most important, long-lasting unions between an Asian state and a European overseas enterprise and the surprisingly limited influence of Europeans operating in early-modern Asia.

The Shogun s City

First Published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: Noël Nouët

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0904404617

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 216

First Published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

A Brief History of Japan

This fascinating history tells the story of the people of Japan, from ancient teenage priest-queens to teeming hordes of salarymen, a nation that once sought to conquer China, yet also shut itself away for two centuries in self-imposed ...

Author: Jonathan Clements

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462919340

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 187

This fascinating history tells the story of the people of Japan, from ancient teenage priest-queens to teeming hordes of salarymen, a nation that once sought to conquer China, yet also shut itself away for two centuries in self-imposed seclusion. First revealed to Westerners in the chronicles of Marco Polo, Japan was a legendary faraway land defended by a fearsome Kamikaze storm and ruled by a divine sovereign. It was the terminus of the Silk Road, the furthest end of the known world, a fertile source of inspiration for European artists, and an enduring symbol of the mysterious East. In recent times, it has become a powerhouse of global industry, a nexus of popular culture, and a harbinger of post-industrial decline. With intelligence and wit, author Jonathan Clements blends documentary and storytelling styles to connect the past, present and future of Japan, and in broad yet detailed strokes reveals a country of paradoxes: a modern nation steeped in ancient traditions; a democracy with an emperor as head of state; a famously safe society built on 108 volcanoes resting on the world's most active earthquake zone; a fast-paced urban and technologically advanced country whose land consists predominantly of mountains and forests. Among the chapters in this Japanese history book are: The Way of the Gods: Prehistoric and Mythical Japan A Game of Thrones: Minamoto vs. Taira Time Warp: 200 Years of Isolation The Stench of Butter: Restoration and Modernization The New Breed: The Japanese Miracle