Shogun Japan

Tokugawa Ieyasu • Daimyo of Edo; proclaimed shogun in 1603 • Installed his son
as shogun in order to strengthen Tokugawa control and eliminate problems of
succession • Political unity Tokugawa Ieyasu, who seized power after the death
of ...

Author: Social Studies School Service

Publisher: Social Studies

ISBN: 1560042338

Category:

Page:

View: 976


The Company and the Shogun

The first book to treat the Dutch East India Company as more than a commercial enterprise, this text offers unprecedented perspective on one of the most important, long-lasting unions between an Asian state and a European overseas ...

Author: Adam Clulow

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231164289

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 344

The Dutch East India Company was a unique, hybrid organization acting as both company and state, aggressively intervening in Asian political matters in which it had no place. This study focuses on the company’s clashes with Tokugawa Japan in the seventeenth century, particularly in the areas of diplomacy, sovereignty, and violence. In each encounter, the Dutch were forced to abandon claims to sovereign powers and refashion themselves—from subjects of a fictive king to loyal vassals of the shogun, from aggressive pirates to meek merchants, and from insistent defenders of colonial rule to legal subjects of the Tokugawa state. The first book to treat the Dutch East India Company as more than a commercial enterprise, this text offers unprecedented perspective on one of the most important, long-lasting unions between an Asian state and a European overseas enterprise and the surprisingly limited influence of Europeans operating in early-modern Asia.

The Dog Shogun

The fourth shogun Ietsuna, for instance, was described as just a very ordinary
man. The commentator seems to be aware of the contradictions in Tsunayoshi's
appraisal, for the shogun's faults are explained as “one side of his brilliant talent,”
 ...

Author: Beatrice M. Bodart-Bailey

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 082483030X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 390

View: 718

Tsunayoshi (1646–1709), the fifth Tokugawa shogun, is one of the most notorious figures in Japanese history. Viewed by many as a tyrant, his policies were deemed eccentric, extreme, and unorthodox. His Laws of Compassion, which made the maltreatment of dogs an offense punishable by death, earned him the nickname Dog Shogun, by which he is still popularly known today. However, Tsunayoshi’s rule coincides with the famed Genroku era, a period of unprecedented cultural growth and prosperity that Japan would not experience again until the mid-twentieth century. It was under Tsunayoshi that for the first time in Japanese history considerable numbers of ordinary townspeople were in a financial position to acquire an education and enjoy many of the amusements previously reserved for the ruling elite. Based on a masterful re-examination of primary sources, this exciting new work by a senior scholar of the Tokugawa period maintains that Tsunayoshi’s notoriety stems largely from the work of samurai historians and officials who saw their privileges challenged by a ruler sympathetic to commoners. Beatrice Bodart-Bailey’s insightful analysis of Tsunayoshi’s background sheds new light on his personality and the policies associated with his shogunate. Tsunayoshi was the fourth son of Tokugawa Iemitsu (1604–1651) and left largely in the care of his mother, the daughter of a greengrocer. Under her influence, Bodart-Bailey argues, the future ruler rebelled against the values of his class. As evidence she cites the fact that, as shogun, Tsunayoshi not only decreed the registration of dogs, which were kept in large numbers by samurai and posed a threat to the populace, but also the registration of pregnant women and young children to prevent infanticide. He decreed, moreover, that officials take on the onerous tasks of finding homes for abandoned children and caring for sick travelers. In the eyes of his detractors, Tsunayoshi’s interest in Confucian and Buddhist studies and his other intellectual pursuits were merely distractions for a dilettante. Bodart-Bailey counters that view by pointing out that one of Japan’s most important political philosophers, Ogyû Sorai, learned his craft under the fifth shogun. Sorai not only praised Tsunayoshi’s government, but his writings constitute the theoretical framework for many of the ruler’s controversial policies. Another salutary aspect of Tsunayoshi’s leadership that Bodart-Bailey brings to light is his role in preventing the famines and riots that would have undoubtedly taken place following the worst earthquake and tsunami as well as the most violent eruption of Mount Fuji in history—all of which occurred during the final years of Tsunayoshi's shogunate. The Dog Shogun is a thoroughly revisionist work of Japanese political history that touches on many social, intellectual, and economic developments as well. As such it promises to become a standard text on late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth-century Japan.

The Shogun s Daughter

Shying away from Yoshisato, the shogun said, “The problem is . . . Lately I've, ahh
, begun to wonder if you're, ahh, really my son.” “Of course I'm your son!”
Yoshisato looked so anxious that Yanagisawa winced. Fearful of being punished
for his ...

Author: Laura Joh Rowland

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1250028620

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 709

Japan, 1704. In an elegant mansion a young woman named Tsuruhime lies on her deathbed, attended by her nurse. Smallpox pustules cover her face. Incense burns, to banish the evil spirits of disease. After Tsuruhime takes her last breath, the old woman watching from the doorway says, "Who's going to tell the Shogun his daughter is dead?" The death of the Shogun's daughter has immediate consequences on his regime. There will be no grandchild to leave the kingdom. Faced with his own mortality and beset by troubles caused by the recent earthquake, he names as his heir Yoshisato, the seventeen-year-old son he only recently discovered was his. Until five months ago, Yoshisato was raised as the illegitimate son of Yanagisawa, the shogun's favorite advisor. Yanagisawa is also the longtime enemy of Sano Ichiro. Sano doubts that Yoshisato is really the Shogun's son, believing it's more likely a power-play by Yanagisawa. When Sano learns that Tsuruhime's death may have been a murder, he sets off on a dangerous investigation that leads to more death and destruction as he struggles to keep his pregnant wife, Reiko, and his son safe. Instead, he and his family become the accused. And this time, they may not survive the day. Laura Joh Rowland's thrilling series set in Feudal Japan is as gripping and entertaining as ever.

The Last Shogun

GENEALOGY OF THE TOKUGAWA FAMILY Matsudaira Kiyoyasu 1511 - 35
Matsudaira Hirotada 1526 - 49 Tokugawa leyasu 1543 - 1616 ( 1st Tokugawa
shogun 1603 - 05 ) | TOKUGAWA FAMILY OF Mito Yorifusa 1603 - 61 Mitsukuni |
1628 ...

Author: Ryōtarō Shiba

Publisher: Kodansha

ISBN:

Category: Historical fiction

Page: 255

View: 554

The Meiji Restoration - as history calls it - toppled the shogunate, and brought a seventeen-year-old boy emperor back from the secluded Imperial Palace in Kyoto to preside over what amounted to a political and cultural revolution. With this, Japan's extraordinary self-modernization began in earnest.

Shogun

Shogun. 1. Japan—History—Tokugawa period, 1600-1868Fiction. I. Title. II. Title:
Shogun. PR6053.L365S5 1983 823'.914 82-19788 ISBN: 0-385-29224-4
Manufactured in the United States of America Published simultaneously in
Canada 10 ...

Author: James Clavell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 802

View: 487

For use in schools and libraries only. A narrative of conflicting cultures, loyalties, motivations, and traditions in early seventeenth-century Japan, involving the power-hungry Lord Toranaga, the Lady Mariko, and the ambitious Englishman, Blackthorne.

Learning from Sh gun

For educators , it is useful to understand Shogun if only because so many people
have read it . Based on our own experience , anywhere from one - fifth to one -
half of all students who currently enroll in college - level courses about Japan ...

Author: Henry DeWitt Smith (II)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 163

View: 633


Sabotaging the Shogun

It had placed three of its chosen men in top positions ; the roju were submissive
and agreed at the beginning of August that the seventeen - year - old shogun
should visit Kyoto the following winter . For them it was a very public humiliation ,
as ...

Author: John McMaster

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 631


Shogun Management

SHOGUN MANAGEMENT " " . Copyright © 1993 by Development Dimensions
International , Inc. All rights reserved . Printed in the United States of America . No
part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without ...

Author: William C. Byham

Publisher: Harpercollins

ISBN: 9780887306303

Category: Corporate culture

Page: 248

View: 645

A guide for Americans working for Japanese companies examines how differences in culture and management styles affect corporate life, offers career tips, and explains how to unite the best features of American and Japanese business. 12,500 first printing.

Shogun

This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan.

Author: James Clavell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1848943121

Category: Fiction

Page: 1136

View: 113

This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan. Both entertaining and incisive, SHOGUN is a stunningly dramatic re-creation of a very different world. Starting with his shipwreck on this most alien of shores, the novel charts Blackthorne's rise from the status of reviled foreigner up to the hights of trusted advisor and eventually, Samurai. All as civil war looms over the fragile country.


The Shogun Inheritance

Author: Michael Macintyre

Publisher: A & W Pub

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 215

View: 575

Photographs show how Japan's traditions, dating back to the seventeenth-century feudal period, still influence the culture and daily life in modern Japan

The Shogun Age Exhibition

Author: Yoshinobu Tokugawa

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 279

View: 408

Shogun age exhibition is being held in hopes of imparting a better understanding of Japanese history and traditional culture to the American and European people. This exhibition is mainly composed of articles used by the daimyo (such as swords, armor, household effects, and tea ceremony utensils), which have been handed down from generation to generation for more than tree hundred years within the Tokugawa family--the family that played a significant role in the pre-modern history of Japan. Approximately three hundred items have been carefully selected from the collection of the Tokugawa Art Museum in Nagoya for exhibition. Most of these valuable items have never been allowed out of Japan before, and the fact that they will be on exhibition in several cities in the United States and Europe for two and a half years is also unprecedented. The family of the Tokugawa shoguns exerted its authority in every aspect of Japan's pre-modern period as the supreme power in the land. In particular, the culture developed by the shogunal family was revered by the common people as the ideal culture of that time, and has been regarded as the source of traditional Japanese art. This catalog introduces all three hundred exhibit items in magnificent color photos, and with text that explains in readily understandable terms the significance fo the age of the shoguns, the authority wielded by the shogun, and the aesthetic sensiblilities fo the members of the samurai class.

A Brief History of Japan

This fascinating history tells the story of the people of Japan, from ancient teenage priest-queens to teeming hordes of salarymen, a nation that once sought to conquer China, yet also shut itself away for two centuries in self-imposed ...

Author: Jonathan Clements

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462919340

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 756

This fascinating history tells the story of the people of Japan, from ancient teenage priest-queens to teeming hordes of salarymen, a nation that once sought to conquer China, yet also shut itself away for two centuries in self-imposed seclusion. First revealed to Westerners in the chronicles of Marco Polo, Japan was a legendary faraway land defended by a fearsome Kamikaze storm and ruled by a divine sovereign. It was the terminus of the Silk Road, the furthest end of the known world, a fertile source of inspiration for European artists, and an enduring symbol of the mysterious East. In recent times, it has become a powerhouse of global industry, a nexus of popular culture, and a harbinger of post-industrial decline. With intelligence and wit, author Jonathan Clements blends documentary and storytelling styles to connect the past, present and future of Japan, and in broad yet detailed strokes reveals a country of paradoxes: a modern nation steeped in ancient traditions; a democracy with an emperor as head of state; a famously safe society built on 108 volcanoes resting on the world's most active earthquake zone; a fast-paced urban and technologically advanced country whose land consists predominantly of mountains and forests. Among the chapters in this Japanese history book are: The Way of the Gods: Prehistoric and Mythical Japan A Game of Thrones: Minamoto vs. Taira Time Warp: 200 Years of Isolation The Stench of Butter: Restoration and Modernization The New Breed: The Japanese Miracle

Shogun

This book tells the fascinating history of the life of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu — Japan's most famous Shogun.

Author: A. L. Sadler

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 9784805310427

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 162

This book tells the fascinating history of the life of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu — Japan's most famous Shogun. Since its initial appearance, A.L.Sadler's imposing biography of the Japanese Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu has been recognized as an outstanding contribution to the knowledge of Japanese history. It is also considered the standard reference work on the period that saw the entrenchment of feudalism in Japan and the opening of some two and a half centuries of rigid isolation from the rest of the world. In the course of Japanese history, there have been five great military leaders who by common consent stand out above the others of their type. Of these, two lived in the twelfth century, while the other three, Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu, were contemporary in the latter half of the sixteenth century. The last of these three, with whose life Mr. Sadler deals, may well be described as having perfected the shogunate system. Not only did Ieyasu found a dynasty of rulers and organize a powerful system of government, but also he rounded off his achievements by contriving before his death to arrange for his deification afterward. As Mr. Sadler notes, "Tokugawa Ieyasu is unquestionably one of the greatest men the world has yet seen," and this fascinating account of Ieyasu's life and times is presented in a thoroughly absorbing narrative in which dramatic highlights abound. Japan's feudal age came to a close in 1868 with the downfall of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the restoration of the Emperor to political power. The event marked the end of the powerful regime that Ieyasu established at the beginning of the seventeenth century. That it did not at the same time mark the eclipse of Ieyasu's greatness is sufficient testimony to the major role he played in his country's history. It is to A. L. Sadler's lasting credit that he has brought this eminent but often ruthless military leader so vividly to life.

The Court Journey to the Sh gun of Japan

Author: Jan Cock Blomhoff

Publisher: Koninklijk Instituut Voor De tropen

ISBN: 9789074822183

Category: History

Page: 133

View: 882

The Dutch Director or "Opperhoofd" of Deshima was required to make an annual journey to the shogun’s court in Edo (present-day Tokyo). Opperhoofd Jan Cock Blomhoff (1779-1853) made his first journey to Edo in 1818. In addition to the official diary he kept during this journey, Blomhoff also maintained correspondence with his wife Titia in Holland. This hitherto unpublished material is a major source of knowledge on Tokugawa Japan. It offers details about Blomhoff's travels and contains numerous references to the objects he acquired. Many of these pieces are reproduced in the book, along with other documents, such as maps. (See also the publication "Titia - The First Western Woman in Japan")

Native American in the Land of the Shogun

Based on primary research in Japan and North America, this book chronicles the events leading to MacDonald’s journey and his later struggle to obtain recognition at home.

Author: Frederik L. Schodt

Publisher: Stone Bridge Press, Inc.

ISBN: 1611725410

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 616

A wide-ranging, readable account of an eccentric and exceptional man who crossed cultures and changed history.

The Shogun s Queen

'A persuasive storyteller and the setting is mesmerising' Antonia Senior, The Times _________________ The year is 1853, and a young Japanese girl’s world is about to be turned upside down.

Author: Lesley Downer

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 144815247X

Category: Fiction

Page: 544

View: 703

'A persuasive storyteller and the setting is mesmerising' Antonia Senior, The Times _________________ The year is 1853, and a young Japanese girl’s world is about to be turned upside down. When black ships carrying barbarians arrive on the shores of Japan, the Satsuma clan’s way of life is threatened. But it’s not just the samurai who must come together to fight: the beautiful, headstrong Okatsu is also given a new destiny by her feudal lord – to save the realm. Armed only with a new name, Princess Atsu, as she is now known, journeys to the women’s palace of Edo Castle, a place so secret it cannot be marked on any map. Behind the palace’s immaculate façade, amid rumours of murder and whispers of ghosts, Atsu must uncover the mystery that surrounds the man whose fate, it seems, is irrevocably linked to hers – the shogun himself – if she is to rescue her people . . .

Sh gun

After John Blackthorne shipwrecks in Japan, he makes himself useful to a feudal lord in a power struggle with another and becomes a samurai.

Author: James Clavell

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton Limited

ISBN: 9780340766163

Category: British

Page: 1125

View: 651

This is James Clavell's tour-de-force; an epic saga of one Pilot-Major John Blackthorne, and his integration into the struggles and strife of feudal Japan. Both entertaining and incisive, SHOGUN is a stunningly dramatic re-creation of a very different world. Starting with his shipwreck on this most alien of shores, the novel charts Blackthorne's rise from the status of reviled foreigner up to the heights of trusted advisor and eventually, Samurai. All as civil war looms over the fragile country.

Sh gun

Endlessly compelling, this sweeping saga captivated the world to become not only one of the best-selling novels of all time but also one of the highest-rated television miniseries, as well as inspiring a nationwide surge of interest in the ...

Author: James Clavell

Publisher: Blackstone Publishing

ISBN: 198253754X

Category: Fiction

Page: 1152

View: 829

After Englishman John Blackthorne is lost at sea, he awakens in a place few Europeans know of and even fewer have seen—Nippon. Thrust into the closed society that is seventeenth-century Japan, a land where the line between life and death is razor-thin, Blackthorne must negotiate not only a foreign people, with unknown customs and language, but also his own definitions of morality, truth, and freedom. As internal political strife and a clash of cultures lead to seemingly inevitable conflict, Blackthorne’s loyalty and strength of character are tested by both passion and loss, and he is torn between two worlds that will each be forever changed. Powerful and engrossing, capturing both the rich pageantry and stark realities of life in feudal Japan, Shōgun is a critically acclaimed powerhouse of a book. Heart-stopping, edge-of-your-seat action melds seamlessly with intricate historical detail and raw human emotion. Endlessly compelling, this sweeping saga captivated the world to become not only one of the best-selling novels of all time but also one of the highest-rated television miniseries, as well as inspiring a nationwide surge of interest in the culture of Japan. Shakespearean in both scope and depth, Shōgun is, as the New York Times put it, “...not only something you read—you live it.” Provocative, absorbing, and endlessly fascinating, there is only one: Shōgun.