Soviet Ideologies in the Period of Glasnost

Gorbachev underscored many times that this system completely failed to prevent corruption and deter the violation of laws by apparatchiks, ... and seemingly even in communication with each other the 150 Soviet Ideologies Under Glasnost.

Author: Vladimir Shlapentokh

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 211

View: 305

The mid-1970s found almost all spheres of Soviet society in economic, social, and moral decline - a decline that generated conflicting ideologies offering solutions. This text provides an examination of these ideologies, both historically and analytically.

The Soviet Union

First Published in 2017. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Author: Aron Katsenelinboigen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351316907

Category: Political Science

Page: 491

View: 542

First Published in 2017. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Soviet Cinema and Youth

Essay from the year 2013 in the subject Russian / Slavic Languages, grade: 1,3, University of Dalarna, language: English, abstract: The history of the Soviet Union has shown that the light heartedness, the insouciance and the naive optimism ...

Author: Anne Schumacher

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 365658298X

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 13

View: 979

Essay from the year 2013 in the subject Russian / Slavic Languages, grade: 1,3, University of Dalarna, language: English, abstract: The history of the Soviet Union has shown that the light heartedness, the insouciance and the naive optimism, which distinguishes children and adolescents from their parents and grandparents, can disappear easily in times of war and oppression. With the takeover of Josef Stalin in the late 1920s, the beginning of one of the darkest periods of the Soviet Union was announced. Stalin’s totalitarian regime was marked by a rigid authoritarianism and a widespread use of terror in form of the so-called purges, which would not end until his death in March 1953.1 In addition to the Stalinist regime, Soviet Union suffered under the consequences of the Eastern Front War (World War II), in which Soviet Union lost thousands and thousands of men, and the ensuing Cold War. This more than twenty years of terror, purges and war was a time in which children rarely had time to be children, and adolescents very seldom had time for leisure and jauntily dreaming, in short to be young. Nor was it a time in which their personal suffering, like the suffering of their parents and grandparents, appeared on screen. Nevertheless was youth represented in Stalinist movies, a lot of young people were showed riding tractors and starred the popular Stalinist musicals. “Youth was the natural supporter of the new regime“ and the older generations “could be treated with circumspection” (Gillenspie, 2003, p. 164). Though it was never one person only the starred a Stalinist movie, the hero was the collective and individual miseries and fates never played a role in Stalinist cinema. Problems of the youth were hushed up, like all other form of social malaise (Gillespie, 2003, p. 157). Pain and suffering did barely exist officially and were not represented in the movies of the Stalin era, which were meant to serve as an instrument of the communist ideology. [...]

Conversations with Gorbachev

Readers are invited to eavesdrop on an intimate conversation between one of the towering figures of the 20th century and his closest friend as they chat about the momentous events they lived through and helped orchestrate.

Author: Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231118644

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 225

View: 436

Readers are invited to eavesdrop on an intimate conversation between one of the towering figures of the 20th century and his closest friend as they chat about the momentous events they lived through and helped orchestrate.

Gorbachev And The Decline Of Ideology In Soviet Foreign Policy

Through a combination of actions and words, Mikhail Gorbachev has sought to convince the West that the USSR is not dangerous, either militarily or politically.

Author: Sylvia Babus Woodby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429713924

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 792

Through a combination of actions and words, Mikhail Gorbachev has sought to convince the West that the USSR is not dangerous, either militarily or politically. At home, he has sought to convince his countrymen that it is time to abandon the idea that the USSR is at war with the non-socialist world, and that it must keep the West at arms -length. I

Reconsidering Stagnation in the Brezhnev Era

This volume contributes to a growing reevaluation of the Brezhnev era, helping to shape a new historiography that gives us a much richer and more nuanced picture of the time period than the stagnation paradigm usually assigned to the era.

Author: Dina Fainberg

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498529941

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 390

This volume contributes to a growing reevaluation of the Brezhnev era, helping to shape a new historiography that gives us a much richer and more nuanced picture of the time period than the stagnation paradigm usually assigned to the era. The essays provide a multifaceted prism that reveals a dynamic society with a political and intellectual class that remained committed to the ideological foundations of the state, recognized the challenges that the system faced, and embarked on a creative search for solutions. The chapters focus on developments in politics, society, and culture, as well as the state’s attempts to lead and initiate change, which are mostly glossed over in the stagnation narrative. The volume challenges the assumption that the period as a whole was characterized by rampant cynicism and a decline of faith in the socialist creed and instead points to the persistence of popular engagement with the socialist ideology and the power it continued to wield within the Soviet Union.

Soviet Politics

Providing key texts and bibliographies, this book offers the complete history and politics of the Soviet period in a single volume.

Author: Richard Sakwa

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134909969

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 791

Soviet Politics in Perspective is a new edition of Richard Sakwas successful textbook Soviet Politics: an introduction. Thoroughly revised and updated it builds on the previous editions comprehensive and accessible exploration of the Soviet system, from its rise in 1919 to its collapse in 1991. The book is divided into five parts, which focus on key aspects of Soviet politics. They are: * historical perspectives, beginning with the Tsarist regime on the eve of Revolution, the rise and development of Stalinism, through to the decline of the regime under Brezhnev and his successors and Gorbachev's attempts to revive the system * institutions of Government, such as the Communist Party, security apparatus, the military, the justice system, local government and participation * theoretical approaches to Soviet politics, including class and gender politics, the role of ideology and the shift from dissent to pluralism * key policy areas: the command economy and reform; nationality politics; and foreign and defence policy * an evaluation of Soviet rule, and reasons for its collapse. Providing key texts and bibliographies, this book offers the complete history and politics of the Soviet period in a single volume. It will be indispensable to students of Soviet and post-Soviet politics as well as the interested general reader.

Vocabulary of Soviet Society and Culture

The entries are listed alphabetically in English transliteration followed by the Cyrillic, although readers familiar with Russian may prefer to use the Cyrillic alphabet listing included in this volume.

Author: Irina H. Corten

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 176

View: 756

Irina H. Corten's Vocabulary of Soviet Society and Culture is an experiment in what Soviet scholars call lingvostranovedenie—the study of a country and its culture through the peculiarities of its language. Not a conventional dictionary, Corten's lexicon is selective, offering a broad sampling of culturally significant words in the areas of politics, ideology, the economy, education, arts and letters, social problems and everyday life as well as language associated with the personalities and activities of individual Soviet leaders. The entries are listed alphabetically in English transliteration followed by the Cyrillic, although readers familiar with Russian may prefer to use the Cyrillic alphabet listing included in this volume. In each entry, the author provides a succinct but full explanation of the term and, whenever possible, cross-references to other entries, authentic examples of its use, and samples of relevant Soviet jokes. A reader may approach the lexicon either sequentially or with the aid of a subject thesaurus that divides the material into specific topics. A listing of complementary sources of reference appears in a useful bibliography. With this fascinating lexicon of "Sovietisms," Corten provides an invaluable and easily accessible medium for those general readers and scholars of the Russian language and Soviet culture interested in understanding contemporary Soviet life. Selected entries from the Vocabulary of Soviet Society and Culture Anekdótchik (anekdótchitsa) (cyrillic spelling) (n.) 1: A person who tells jokes (anekdoty); 2: coll. since the late Stalin era, a person arrested and given a prison sentence for the telling of political jokes. The phenomenon indicates the important role of the political joke in Soviet culture and, specifically, in the dissident movement. See iazychnik; sident. The following jokes were popular during the Brezhnev era: 1. "Comrade Brezhnev, what is your hobby?" "Collecting jokes about myself." "And how many have you collected so far?" "Two and a half labor camps." 2. Question: What is a marked-down joke? Answer: A joke which, under Stalin, got you ten years in a labor camp, and now gets you only five. egoístiki (cyrillic) (n.; pl.). Lit., little egotists; coll. since the 1970s referring to headsets worn by music lovers, especially teenage fans of rock music. The idea is that, by wearing headsets, one shuts out the world and becomes indifferent to everything except oneself. zhrál'nia (cyrillic) (n.). Der. zhrat', to gorge, devour (vulg.); coll. since the 1970s denoting an eating establishment with inexpensive and often bad-tasting food. In the late 1980s, the term also has been applied to new fast-food restaurants which have been built in Soviet cities by Western concerns, for example, McDonald's. See amerikanka; stekliashka; stoiachka.

Soviet Intellectuals and Political Power

In this unprecedented work on the status and role of intellectuals in Soviet political life, a former Soviet sociologist maps out the delicate, often paradoxical, ties between the political regime and the creative thinkers who play a major ...

Author: Vladimir Shlapentokh

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400861136

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 680

In this unprecedented work on the status and role of intellectuals in Soviet political life, a former Soviet sociologist maps out the delicate, often paradoxical, ties between the political regime and the creative thinkers who play a major part in the movement toward modernization. Beginning with Stalin, Vladimir Shlapentokh explores the mutual need and antagonism that have existed between political leaders and intellectuals. What emerges is a fascinating portrayal of the Soviet intellectual network since the 1950s, which touches on such topics as the role of literature and film in political opposition, levels of opposition (open, legal, and private), and the spread of paranoia as fueled by the KGB. Throughout he shows how the intellectual communityusually a cohesive, liberal grouphas fared under Khrushchev's cautious tolerance, Brezhnev's repressions, and now Gorbachev's Glasnost. Shlapentokh maintains, however, that under Glasnost freer speech has revealed a more pronounced divergence between liberal and conservative thinkers, and has allowed for open conservative opposition to the reformatory measures of Gorbachev and the liberals. He argues that one of the strongest checks on reform is the growing presence of Russophilism--a movement supporting Russian nationalism and Stalin's concept of socialism--among the political elite and the masses. Although the role of the liberal intellectuals in the late 1980s was less prominent than it was in the 1960s, Shlapentokh asserts that they remain the major agent of modernization in the Soviet Union, as well as in other socialist countries. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.