The Christening Party

S798cp The christening party Stanford University Libraries ACY2721 f1 ^ I L "J 3 6105 044 947 625 / 7 DAY BOOK sand to dep't Stanford University Library Stanford, California In order that others may use this book, please return it as ...

Author: Francis Steegmuller

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Category: Inheritance and succession

Page: 213

View: 596

Grandson recounts his observations, as a 7-year-old, on the family reunion on the day of his new sister's christening. Set in a Connecticut resort town at the turn of the century.

The Westminster Review

Christening palms were cloths about four or five feet square , generally made of rich silk or satin , often elaborately embroidered by having a quilted lining . These palms , or panes , as they were sometimes called , were often kept in ...

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Infant baptism or John Jackson s christening

Mary White . — Good day , Mrs. Thompson . Well , Hannah , you can come to us at all events ; you need have nothing to do with the christening . Hannah .-- I will come , Mary . Perhaps I 4 INFANT BAPTISM ; OR ,

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The Young Englishwoman

After the christening , the father goes into the restry to have the child properly registered , and to give the fees . By law none can be claimed for a baptism , but they are always given . The clergyman receives a bank - note or . one ...

Author: BEETON

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The Power of Gifts

The royal Jewel House gift rolls record christening gifts after those of the New Year, intermixed with presents to ambassadors and visiting princes. Although the size and value of these presents was less than those to the ambassadors, ...

Author: Felicity Heal

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199542953

Category: History

Page: 272

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Gifts are always with us: we use them positively to display affection and show gratitude for favours; we suspect that others give and accept them as douceurs and bribes. The gift also performed these roles in early modern English culture: and assumed a more significant role because networks of informal support and patronage were central to social and political behaviour. Favours, and their proper acknowledgement, were preoccupations of the age of Erasmus, Shakespeare, and Hobbes. As in modern society, giving and receiving was complex and full of the potential for social damage. 'Almost nothing', men of the Renaissance learned from that great classical guide to morality, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, 'is more disgraceful than the fact that we do not know how either to give or receive benefits'. The Power of Gifts is about those gifts and benefits - what they were, and how they were offered and received in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It shows that the mode of giving, as well as what was given, was crucial to social bonding and political success. The volume moves from a general consideration of the nature of the gift to an exploration of the politics of giving. In the latter chapters some of the well-known rituals of English court life - the New Year ceremony, royal progresses, diplomatic missions - are viewed through the prism of gift-exchange. Gifts to monarchs or their ministers could focus attention on the donor, those from the crown could offer some assurance of favour. These fundamentals remained the same throughout the century and a half before the Civil War, but the attitude of individual monarchs altered specific behaviour. Elizabeth expected to be wooed with gifts and dispensed benefits largely for service rendered, James I modelled giving as the largesse of the Renaissance prince, Charles I's gift-exchanges focused on the art collecting of his coterie. And always in both politics and the law courts there was the danger that gifts would be corroded, morphing from acceptable behaviour into bribes and corruption. The Power of Gifts explores prescriptive literature, pamphlets, correspondence, legal cases and financial records, to illuminate social attitudes and behaviour through a rich series of examples and case-studies.

Ritual and Conflict The Social Relations of Childbirth in Early Modern England

However, mothers may have wanted to be present at the baptism of their newborn children, or at least to take part in what Margaret Cavendish called the 'costly banquets at the christening';144 and there were two different ways of maNing ...

Author: Adrian Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317062507

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 328

This book places childbirth in early-modern England within a wider network of social institutions and relationships. Starting with illegitimacy - the violation of the marital norm - it proceeds through marriage to the wider gender-order and so to the ’ceremony of childbirth’, the popular ritual through which women collectively controlled this, the pivotal event in their lives. Focussing on the seventeenth century, but ranging from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, this study offers a new viewpoint on such themes as the patriarchal family, the significance of illegitimacy, and the structuring of gender-relations in the period.

Etiquette what to do and how to do it

Christening cake is not distributed among friends like wedding cake , but a piece is often put carefully in a tin box , and hermetically sealed , and so kept until , if all is well , the child attains the age of seven , when it should ...

Author: lady Constance Eleanora C. Howard

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Category: Etiquette

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Infant Baptism a Part and Pillar of Popery

dantly evident from the fact , that through the christening of children , introduced by him , he has made whole nations nominally Christian , and has applied to them the designation of Christendom ; thus extending the limits of his ...

Author: John Gill

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Category: Baptists

Page: 125

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The Ladies Repository

... had also been brought to the christening , dressed in a velvet frock Two years after the birth of the little and a peculiar ... in little monkey ” thought the rest of the comorder to invite the family to a christening ; a pany .

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