The Fall of Carthage

An epic of war and battle, this is also the story of famous generals and leaders: Hannibal, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, and his grandson Scipio Aemilianus, who would finally bring down the walls of Carthage.

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1780223064

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 316

The struggle between Rome and Carthage in the Punic Wars was arguably the greatest and most desperate conflict of antiquity. The forces involved and the casualties suffered by both sides were far greater than in any wars fought before the modern era, while the eventual outcome had far-reaching consequences for the history of the Western World, namely the ascendancy of Rome. An epic of war and battle, this is also the story of famous generals and leaders: Hannibal, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, and his grandson Scipio Aemilianus, who would finally bring down the walls of Carthage.

The Empire of Africa

This Leonaur edition is profusely illustrated with line drawings, maps and plans to support the text. Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket.

Author: Alfred J. Church

Publisher: Leonaur Limited

ISBN: 9781782828808

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 918

The great struggle for imperial dominance in the ancient world Although this history of Carthage covers events from the earliest days of that state, the text concentrates particularly on the period from 550 BC until the fall of the city after a three year siege to Roman forces under Scipio Aemilianus in the Third Punic War in 146 BC. This period in the Mediterranean ancient world was dominated by the rivalry between Carthage and Rome which was inevitably moving towards the total destruction of one of the protagonists. Church's book is an excellent history that describes these conflicts in detail from the campaigns of Malchus and the Battle of Alalia through to the struggles in Sicily, Spain, Italy and Africa. Notable battles such as Crimessus, Trasumennus, Cannae, Zama and many others are described together with accounts of the famous generals of both armies. This Leonaur edition is profusely illustrated with line drawings, maps and plans to support the text. Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket.



Lords of the World A Story of the Fall of Carthage and Corinth

The Carthaginian may be best described by saying that he resembled the more ... it for granted that the young man had perished in the destruction of Chelys.

Author: Alfred John Church

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465610855

Category: Carthage (Extinct city)

Page: 400

View: 160

THE Melcart, the sacred ship of Carthage, was on its homeward voyage from Tyre, and had accomplished the greater part of its journey in safety; in fact, it was only a score or so of miles away from its destination. It had carried the mission sent, year by year, to the famous shrine of the god whose name it bore, the great temple which the Greeks called by the title of the Tyrian Hercules. This was too solemn and important a function to be dropped on any pretext whatsoever. Never, even in the time of her deepest distress, had Carthage failed to pay this dutiful tribute to the patron deity of her mother-city; and, indeed, she had never been in sorer straits than now. Rome, in the early days her ally, then her rival, and now her oppressor, was resolved to destroy her, forcing her into war by demanding impossible terms of submission. Her old command of the sea had long since departed. It was only by stealth and subtlety that one of her ships could hope to traverse unharmed the five hundred leagues of sea that lay between her harbour and the old capital of Phœnicia. The Melcart had hitherto been fortunate. She was a first-rate sailer, equally at home with the light breeze to which she could spread all her canvas and the gale which reduced her to a single sprit-sail. She had a picked crew, with not a slave on the rowing benches, for there were always freeborn Carthaginians ready to pull an oar in the Melcart. Hanno, her captain, namesake and descendant of the great discoverer who had sailed as far down the African coast as Sierra Leone itself, was famous for his seamanship from the Pillars of Hercules to the harbours of Syria. The old man—it was sixty years since he had made his first voyage—was watching intently a dark speck which had been visible for some time in the light of early dawn upon the north-western horizon. "Mago," he said at last, turning to his nephew and lieutenant, "does it seem to you to become bigger? your eyes are better than mine."

Hannibal s Last Battle

Thereafter, Rome became the dominant civilization of the Mediterranean. Here, Brian Todd Carey recounts that battle and the grueling war that led up to it.

Author: Brian Todd Carey

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473814812

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 225

A “crisply written, well researched . . . superb piece of scholarship about one of the most dramatic and decisive battles in the ancient world” (Journal of Military History). At Zama (in what is now Tunisia) in 202 BC, the armies of two great empires clashed: the Romans under Scipio Africanus and Carthaginians, led by Hannibal. Scipio’s forces would win a decisive, bloody victory that forever shifted the balance of power in the ancient world. Thereafter, Rome became the dominant civilization of the Mediterranean. Here, Brian Todd Carey recounts that battle and the grueling war that led up to it. He offers fascinating insight into the Carthaginian and Roman methods of waging war, their military organizations, equipment, and the tactics the armies employed. He also delivers an in-depth critical assessment of the contrasting qualities and leadership styles of Hannibal and Scipio, the two most celebrated commanders of their age. With vivid prose and detailed maps of the terrains of the time, Hannibal’s Last Battle is an essential text for fans of military history and students of the classical period.

Carthage Must Be Destroyed

Presents a history of the city whose defeat was one of the ancient world's defining moments, covering such topics as its founding by the Phoenicians of Lebanon, its status as a great sea power, and the contributions of its military leader ...

Author: Richard Miles

Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780143121299

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 720

Presents a history of the city whose defeat was one of the ancient world's defining moments, covering such topics as its founding by the Phoenicians of Lebanon, its status as a great sea power, and the contributions of its military leader Hannibal.


Lords of the World

Author: Church Alfred John

Publisher: Hardpress Publishing

ISBN: 9781318049615

Category:

Page: 344

View: 386

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

A Manual of Ancient History from the Earliest Times to the Fall of the Western Empire Comprising the History of Chaldea Assyria Media Babylonia Lydia Phoenicia Syria Judea Egypt Carthage Persia Greece Macedonia Rome and Parthia by George Rawlinson

B. History of Carthage from its Foundation to the Commencement of the Wars with Rome . Sources . It is unfortunate that we possess no native accounts of the ...

Author: George Rawlinson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 580

View: 299







The Fall of the Roman Empire

Within a hundred years the last Emperor of the Western Empire had been deposed. What had gone wrong? In this ground breaking book, Peter Heather proproses a stunning new solution to one of the greatest mysteries of history.

Author: Peter Heather

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330529838

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 345

In AD 378 the Roman Empire had been the unrivalled superpower of Europe for well over four hundred years. And yet, August that year saw a small group of German-speaking asylum-seekers rout a vast Imperial army at Hadrianople, killing the Emperor and establishing themselves on Roman territory. Within a hundred years the last Emperor of the Western Empire had been deposed. What had gone wrong? In this ground breaking book, Peter Heather proproses a stunning new solution to one of the greatest mysteries of history. Mixing authoratative analysis with thrilling narrative, he brings fresh insight into the panorama of the empire's end, from the bejewelled splendour of the imperial court to the dripping forests of "Barbaricum". He examines the extraordinary success story that was the Roman Empire and uses a new understanding of its continued strength and enduring limitations to show how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome, eventually pulled it apart. 'a colourful and enthralling narrative . . .an account full of keen wit and an infectious relish for the period.’ Independent On Sunday ‘provides the reader with drama and lurid colour as well as analysis . . . succeeds triumphantly.’ Sunday Times ‘a fascinating story, full of ups and downs and memorable characters’ Spectator ‘bursting with action . . .one can recommend to anyone, whether specialist or interested amateur.’ History Today 'a rare combination of scholarship and flair for narrative' Tom Holland




Carthage and Her Remains

THE FALL OF CARTHAGE . Half a century had elapsed since the termination of the second Punic war , when Rome again took up arms against Carthage .

Author: Nathan Davis

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 631

View: 369