The Fall of the House of Dixie

Levine recounts this tale of Southern institutional rot with the ease and authority born of decades of study.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review) “A deep, rich, and complex analysis of the period surrounding and including the American ...

Author: Bruce Levine

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0679645357

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 256

In this major new history of the Civil War, Bruce Levine tells the riveting story of how that conflict upended the economic, political, and social life of the old South, utterly destroying the Confederacy and the society it represented and defended. Told through the words of the people who lived it, The Fall of the House of Dixie illuminates the way a war undertaken to preserve the status quo became a second American Revolution whose impact on the country was as strong and lasting as that of our first. In 1860 the American South was a vast, wealthy, imposing region where a small minority had amassed great political power and enormous fortunes through a system of forced labor. The South’s large population of slaveless whites almost universally supported the basic interests of plantation owners, despite the huge wealth gap that separated them. By the end of 1865 these structures of wealth and power had been shattered. Millions of black people had gained their freedom, many poorer whites had ceased following their wealthy neighbors, and plantation owners were brought to their knees, losing not only their slaves but their political power, their worldview, their very way of life. This sea change was felt nationwide, as the balance of power in Congress, the judiciary, and the presidency shifted dramatically and lastingly toward the North, and the country embarked on a course toward equal rights. Levine captures the many-sided human drama of this story using a huge trove of diaries, letters, newspaper articles, government documents, and more. In The Fall of the House of Dixie, the true stakes of the Civil War become clearer than ever before, as slaves battle for their freedom in the face of brutal reprisals; Abraham Lincoln and his party turn what began as a limited war for the Union into a crusade against slavery by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation; poor southern whites grow increasingly disillusioned with fighting what they have come to see as the plantation owners’ war; and the slave owners grow ever more desperate as their beloved social order is destroyed, not just by the Union Army, but also from within. When the smoke clears, not only Dixie but all of American society is changed forever. Brilliantly argued and engrossing, The Fall of the House of Dixie is a sweeping account of the destruction of the old South during the Civil War, offering a fresh perspective on the most colossal struggle in our history and the new world it brought into being. Praise for The Fall of the House of Dixie “This is the Civil War as it is seldom seen. . . . A portrait of a country in transition . . . as vivid as any that has been written.”—The Boston Globe “An absorbing social history . . . For readers whose Civil War bibliography runs to standard works by Bruce Catton and James McPherson, [Bruce] Levine’s book offers fresh insights.”—The Wall Street Journal “More poignantly than any book before, The Fall of the House of Dixie shows how deeply intertwined the Confederacy was with slavery, and how the destruction of both made possible a ‘second American revolution’ as far-reaching as the first.”—David W. Blight, author of American Oracle “Splendidly colorful . . . Levine recounts this tale of Southern institutional rot with the ease and authority born of decades of study.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review) “A deep, rich, and complex analysis of the period surrounding and including the American Civil War.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Journal of the Civil War Era

The Confederacy proved the House of Dixie's undoing, as Levine shows, and it
collapsed because of its own internal ... The Fall of the House of Dixie contains
little new for Civil War historians; for scholars of the era, this remains very familiar
 ...

Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608995

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 886

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 3, Number 4 December 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS SPECIAL ISSUE: PROCLAIMING EMANCIPATION AT 150 Articles Introduction Martha S. Jones, Guest Editor History and Commemoration: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150 James Oakes Reluctant to Emancipate? Another Look at the First Confiscation Act Stephen Sawyer & William J. Novak Emancipation and the Creation of Modern Liberal States in America and France Thavolia Glymph Rose's War and the Gendered Politics of a Slave Insurgency in the Civil War Martha Jones Emancipation Encounters: The Meaning of Freedom from the Pages of Civil War Sketchbooks Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors

Coxey s Army

... 1988); Bruce Levine, The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the
Social Revolution That Transformed the South (New York: Random House, 2013
); Eric Foner, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution (New York:
Harper ...

Author: Benjamin F. Alexander

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421416220

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 452

In 1893, after a major British bank failure, a run on U.S. gold reserves, and a late-June stock-market crash, America was in the throes of a serious economic depression. Unemployment rose, foreclosures climbed, and popular unrest mounted. By the following spring, businessman and Populist agitator Jacob S. Coxey was fed up with government inactivity in the face of the crisis. With the help of eccentric showman Carl Browne, he led a group of several hundred unemployed wage earners, small farmers, and crossroads merchants on a march from Massillon, Ohio, to Washington, D.C., to present a "petition in boots" for government-financed jobs building and repairing the nation’s roads. On May 1, the Coxeyites descended on the center of government, where Coxey attempted to deliver a speech on the Capitol steps. The police attacked, a melee ensued, and Coxey and Browne spent a month in jail. Meanwhile, other Coxey-inspired contingents were on their way east from places as far away as San Francisco and Portland. Some of them even hijacked trains along the way. Who was Coxey, and what motivated him—along with the angry marchers who joined his cause? What did other Americans think of the protesters? Was there ever any chance that the protesters’ demands would be met? Where did the agitators fit in with the politics of their day, and how did their actions jibe with the other labor-related protests happening that year? In this concise and gripping narrative, Benjamin F. Alexander contextualizes the march by vividly describing the misery wrought by the Panic of ’93. Alexander brings both Coxey and his fellow leaders to life, along with the reporters and spies who traveled with them and the diverse group of captivated newspaper readers who followed the progress of the marches and train heists. Coxey’s Army explains how the demands of the Coxeyites—far from being the wild schemes of a small group of cranks—fit into a larger history of economic theories that received serious attention long before and long after the Coxey march. Despite running a gauntlet of ridicule, the marchers laid down a rough outline of what, some forty years later, emerged as the New Deal.

Through the Heart of Dixie

Each day was different, each encounter governed by the personalities and
circumstances involved, yet they fall into patterns and tropes. This book explores
those patterns, finding meaning in the stories. That these various stories and ...

Author: Anne Sarah Rubin

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617773

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 211

Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory

Heart of Dixie

S EVEN JAKE LET THE photograph slip from his fingers and fall back into the
box. He frowned, deep in thought, a worry line creasing his brows. Bits of
memories and half-formed hunches whirled in his brain. Two and two were not
adding up ...

Author: Tami Hoag

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 9780553905502

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 602

#1 New York Times bestselling author Tami Hoag mixes mystery and romance in this moving classic novel of a missing woman and the search that brings together the unlikeliest of lovers.… She was a blond goddess, a box office megastar. Every woman wanted to be her; every man wanted to bed her. But over a year ago Devon Stafford vanished without a trace. As a biographer, Jake Gannon had taught himself to follow the clues of a person’s life story like a detective. As an ex-Marine, he was accustomed to being firmly in control. But when his car died in a little town called Mare’s Nest on the Carolina coast, he had to admit he’d come to a dead end. There he met a .38-toting tow-truck driver named Dixie La Fontaine. She was no celebrity, but Dixie had an irresistible sex appeal all her own. What did this down-to-earth woman know about a missing movie star? Surprisingly, quite a lot. And Jake was going to uncover it all…if Dixie didn’t end up shooting him first. From the Paperback edition.

Thaddeus Stevens

In Thaddeus Stevens: Civil War Revolutionary, acclaimed historian Bruce Levine has written the definitive biography of one of the most visionary statesmen of the 19th century and a forgotten champion for racial justice in America.

Author: Bruce Levine

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

ISBN: 9781476793375

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 252

The definitive biography of one of the 19th century’s greatest statesmen, encompassing his decades-long fight against slavery, his key role in the Union war effort, and his postwar struggle to bring racial justice to America. Thaddeus Stevens was among the first to see the Civil War as an opportunity for a second American revolution—a chance to remake the country as a true multiracial democracy. One of the foremost abolitionists in Congress in the years leading up to the war, he was a leader of the young Republican Party’s radical wing, fighting for anti-slavery and anti-racist policies long before party colleagues like Abraham Lincoln endorsed them. It was he, for instance, who urged Lincoln early on to free those enslaved throughout the US and to welcome black men into the Union’s armies. During the Reconstruction era following the Civil War, Stevens demanded equal civil and political rights for black Americans, rights eventually embodied in the 14th and 15th amendments. But while Stevens in many ways pushed his party—and America—towards equality, he also championed ideas too radical for his fellow Congressmen ever to support, such as confiscating large slaveholders’ estates and dividing the land among those who had been enslaved. In Thaddeus Stevens: Civil War Revolutionary, acclaimed historian Bruce Levine has written the definitive biography of one of the most visionary statesmen of the 19th century and a forgotten champion for racial justice in America.

The Fall of the House of Zeus

“Over the past four decades no reporter has critiqued the American South with such evocative sensitivity and bedrock honesty as Curtis Wilkie.” —Douglas Brinkley The Fall of the House of Zeus tells the story of Dickie Scruggs, ...

Author: Curtis Wilkie

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780307460721

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 446

“Over the past four decades no reporter has critiqued the American South with such evocative sensitivity and bedrock honesty as Curtis Wilkie.” —Douglas Brinkley The Fall of the House of Zeus tells the story of Dickie Scruggs, arguably the most successful plaintiff's lawyer in America. A brother-in-law of Trent Lott, the former U.S. Senate Majority Leader, Scruggs made a fortune taking on mass tort lawsuits against “Big Tobacco” and the asbestos industries. He was hailed by Newsweek as a latter day Robin Hood, and portrayed in the movie, The Insider, as a dapper aviator-lawyer. Scruggs’ legal triumphs rewarded him lavishly, and his success emboldened both his career maneuvering and his influence in Southern politics--but at a terrible cost, culminating in his spectacular fall, when he was convicted for conspiring to bribe a Mississippi state judge. Based on extensive interviews, transcripts, and FBI recordings never made public, The Fall of the House of Zeus exposes the dark side of Southern and Washington legal games and power politics: the swirl of fixed cases, blocked investigations, judicial tampering, and a zealous prosecution that would eventually ensnare not only Scruggs but his own son, Zach, in the midst of their struggle with insurance companies over Hurricane Katrina damages. In gripping detail, Curtis Wilkie crafts an authentic legal thriller propelled by a “welter of betrayals and personal hatreds,” providing large supporting parts for Trent Lott and Jim Biden, brother of then-Senator Joe, and cameos by John McCain, Al Gore, and other DC insiders and influence peddlers. Above all, we get to see how and why the mighty fail and fall, a story as gripping and timeless as a Greek tragedy.

Black Flag Over Dixie

Radical leaders now feared that the current political climate might lead to a
Democratic takeover of both Congress and the White House in the fall elections.
Such a result, combined with the current military stalemate, would almost
certainly ...

Author: Gregory J. W. Urwin

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809388286

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 925

Black Flag over Dixie: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in the Civil War highlights the central role that race played in the Civil War by examining some of the ugliest incidents that played out on its battlefields. Challenging the American public’s perception of the Civil War as a chivalrous family quarrel, twelve rising and prominent historians show the conflict to be a wrenching social revolution whose bloody excesses were exacerbated by racial hatred. Edited by Gregory J. W. Urwin, this compelling volume focuses on the tendency of Confederate troops to murder black Union soldiers and runaway slaves and divulges the details of black retaliation and the resulting cycle of fear and violence that poisoned race relations during Reconstruction. In a powerful introduction to the collection, Urwin reminds readers that the Civil War was both a social and a racial revolution. As the heirs and defenders of a slave society’s ideology, Confederates considered African Americans to be savages who were incapable of waging war in a civilized fashion. Ironically, this conviction caused white Southerners to behave savagely themselves. Under the threat of Union retaliation, the Confederate government backed away from failing to treat the white officers and black enlisted men of the United States Colored Troops as legitimate combatants. Nevertheless, many rebel commands adopted a no-prisoners policy in the field. When the Union’s black defenders responded in kind, the Civil War descended to a level of inhumanity that most Americans prefer to forget. In addition to covering the war’s most notorious massacres at Olustee, Fort Pillow, Poison Spring, and the Crater, Black Flag over Dixie examines the responses of Union soldiers and politicians to these disturbing and unpleasant events, as well as the military, legal, and moral considerations that sometimes deterred Confederates from killing all black Federals who fell into their hands. Twenty photographs and a map of massacre and reprisal sites accompany the volume. The contributors are Gregory J. W. Urwin, Anne J. Bailey, Howard C. Westwood, James G. Hollandsworth Jr., David J. Coles, Albert Castel, Derek W. Frisby, Weymouth T. Jordan Jr., Gerald W. Thomas, Bryce A. Suderow, Chad L. Williams, and Mark Grimsley.

Literary Hearthstones of Dixie

The house was burned in the fire of 1865 . In January , 1837 , Poe left the
Messenger and went north , after which most of his work was done in New York
and Philadelphia . “ The Fall of the House of Usher ” was written when he lived
on Sixth ...

Author: La Salle Corbell Pickett

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American literature

Page: 304

View: 758


Coming Home to Mississippi

He is the author of three books: Arkansas Mischief, Dixie, and The Fall of the
House of Zeus. He now lives with his wife, Nancy, in Oxford, where he teaches
journalism at Ole Miss and serves as a fellow at the Overby Center for Southern ...

Author: Charline R. McCord

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617037672

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

View: 115

In this collection, essayists examine their lives, their memories of Mississippi, the reasons they left the state, and what drew them back. They talk about how life differs and wears on you in the far-flung parts of our nation, and the qualities that make Mississippi unique. The writers from all corners of the state are as diverse as the regions from which they come. They are of different races, different life experiences, different talents, and different temperaments. Yet in acceding to the magical lure of Mississippi they are in many ways alike. Their roots are deep in the rich soil of this state, and they come from strong families that valued education and promoted an indomitable optimism. Successes stem from a passion, usually emerging early in life, that burns within them. But that passion is tempered, disciplined, encouraged, and influenced by the people around them, as well as the landscape and the history of their times. These essays give us a glimpse of the people and places that nurtured the young lives of the essayists and offered the values that directed them as they sought their dreams elsewhere. Often they found that opportunity was within their grasp in their home state and came back to realize their full potential. They came back, in some cases, to retire to a familiar place of pleasant memories, to family and to friends. They all have a love and respect for Mississippi and continue, back home, to use their talents to help make the state an even better place to live.

Dixie Betrayed

He now believes the Confederate Senate met in a secondfloor committee room
adjacent to the governor's room, above the House of Delegates Chamber where
the 1870 collapse occurred. Ornamentaldetailsina Frank Leslie's illustration
made ...

Author: David J. Eicher

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 031607571X

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 553

David Eicher reveals the story of the political conspiracy, discord and dysfunction in Richmond that cost the South the Civil War. He shows how President Jefferson Davis fought not only with the Confederate House and Senate and with State Governers but also with his own vice-president and secretary of state.

The Great War in the Heart of Dixie

In time , life returned to normal , and by the fall the worst of the effects of the storm
had been put right . War - related economic news once again rose to the forefront
. 13 After carefully weighing its options during the fall and early winter of 1916 ...

Author: Martin T. Olliff

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 404

There has been much scholarship on how the U.S. as a nation reacted to World War I, but few have explored how Alabama responded. Did the state follow the federal government’s lead in organizing its resources or did Alabamians devise their own solutions to unique problems they faced? How did the state’s cultural institutions and government react? What changes occurred in its economy and way of life? What, if any, were the long-term consequences in Alabama? The contributors to this volume address these questions and establish a base for further investigation of the state during this era. Contributors: David Alsobrook, Wilson Fallin Jr., Robert J. Jakeman, Dowe Littleton, Martin T. Olliff, Victoria E. Ott, Wesley P. Newton, Michael V. R. Thomason, Ruth Smith Truss, and Robert Saunders Jr.

Trees and Shrubs in the Heart of Dixie

This smilax blooms in the fall , ripens fruit in the spring , berries may remain on
the vine till the following year ; one seeded . Grows along shady banks in
pinelands , sandhills , bluffs in Alabama in Escambia , Clark , Lee , Henry ,
Mobile ...

Author: Blanche Evans Dean

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Alabama-Trees and shrubs

Page: 246

View: 876


Dreaming of Dixie

... took over the Maxwell House co∏ee account from jwt, created the Maxwell
House Show Boat in 1931 as a vehicle for promoting the co∏ee brand.35 In the
fall of 1933, Radioland published an article about the development of the show
with ...

Author: Karen L. Cox

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807877786

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 413

From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture portrayed the American South as a region ensconced in its antebellum past, draped in moonlight and magnolias, and represented by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, white-columned mansions, and even bolls of cotton. In Dreaming of Dixie, Karen Cox shows that the chief purveyors of nostalgia for the Old South were outsiders of the region, playing to consumers' anxiety about modernity by marketing the South as a region still dedicated to America's pastoral traditions. In addition, Cox examines how southerners themselves embraced the imaginary romance of the region's past.

Last Bigfoot in Dixie

“The hunters will probably get the killer when the season opens again in the fall
and the weather gets cold enough for the dogs to run.” “Well, 'at ... I don't b'leeve
it's sanitary fer a man to poop inside the house whur he eats and sleeps.

Author: Wally Avett

Publisher: Bell Bridge Books

ISBN: 1611945321

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 402

Killer bear, Appalachian psycho, Yankee gold . . . He's on the trail of something big . . . Deep in the Great Smokies, a huge black bear kills a child at a campground, and a hunt begins in a quiet mountain community where such threats are rare. Wade, an outdoorsman and backwoods columnist, is quickly deputized to find and slay the massive beast terrorizing tourists and locals alike. While on the trail, he is wounded by a pot-grower's booby trap and stalked by Junior, an authentic Appalachian psychopath. Two fellow deputies are gunned down, and rumors of buried Civil War gold surface. Wade gets unexpected assistance from a wannabe writer whose gifts prove helpful even after mushroom trances and spiritual quests--enhanced by a Minnesota Vikings horn-helmet. The discovery of a mysterious doll ties into grisly murders from the past, and Wade meets a tough, old Marine with a puzzling treasure map. All the while, the looming threat of Junior's lethal lunacy stalks Wade and his colorful allies. Wally Avett is a semi-retired realtor in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. He lives in the same little town, sometimes compared to Mayberry, where he was editor and chief writer in the 1970s for the weekly newspaper. These days he writes a column, the Hillbilly Ranger, for the hundred-year-old Cherokee Scout newspaper at Murphy. Avett's first novel, Murder in Caney Fork, was published by Bell Bridge Books, 2014.

Balls

I've never seen Dixie's Birmingham house except in pictures. It's hard to love ... I
point to a shack where the doors hang open on the hinges and there's more stuff
strewn in the yard than there is inside the fall-down house. “I was raised in a ...

Author: Nanci Kincaid

Publisher: Algonquin Books

ISBN: 1565127064

Category: Fiction

Page: 396

View: 871

Set in Alabama, this is a “funny, entertaining novel about college football coaches and the women who love them” (Library Journal). Balls is the story of the rise and fall of a Southern college football coach—told by his wife and the many other women in his orbit, from his mother, mother-in-law, and daughter to the girlfriends and grandmothers who watch from the sidelines, cheering, worrying, and praying when the players are carried off on stretchers. These women standing behind this handsome football hero tell the story of Mac Gibbs, star quarterback, who married the beautiful homecoming queen, Dixie Carraway. Set in the home state of the legendary Paul “Bear” Bryant, the novel relates the tale of Mac’s fame as a college player—and eventual infamy as head coach of the Birmingham University Black Bears. They don’t care much for the “science” of the game—or its brutality. They see football as it really is: sexy, dirty, sweaty, painful, empowering, corrupt. The story they tell is often funny—and not always pretty. Written by a prominent coach’s wife, this is an “engrossing [and] terrific book” about love, competition, and a woman taking control of her own life in an era of change (Booklist). “Kincaid knows her Southern football culture thoroughly. . . . The novel’s warm humor and eccentric characters, so reminiscent of Lee Smith, kicks this into the winning end zone.” —Library Journal “What makes the tale fun is that Kincaid tells it through the eyes of the women in Mac’s life . . . Great Southern details . . . Characters so believable you can hear them drawl.” —People

Dixie

Dixie is a political and social history of the South during the second half of the twentieth century told from Curtis Wilkie's perspective as a white man intimately transformed by enormous racial and political upheavals.

Author: Curtis Wilkie

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743226046

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 749

Dixie is a political and social history of the South during the second half of the twentieth century told from Curtis Wilkie's perspective as a white man intimately transformed by enormous racial and political upheavals. Wilkie's personal take on some of the landmark events of modern American history is as engaging as it is insightful. He attended Ole Miss during the rioting in the fall of 1962, when James Meredith became the first African American to enroll in the school. After graduation, Wilkie worked in Clarksdale, Mississippi, where he met Aaron Henry, a local druggist and later the prominent head of the Mississippi NAACP. He covered the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964 and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party challenge at the national convention in Atlantic City, and he was a member of the biracial insurgent Democratic delegation from Mississippi seated in place of Governor John Bell Williams's delegation at the 1968 convention in Chicago. Wilkie followed Jimmy Carter's campaign for the presidency, becoming friends with Billy Carter; he covered Bill Clinton's election in 1992 and was witness to the South's startling shift from the Democratic Party to the GOP; and finally, he was there when Byron De La Beckwith was convicted for the murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers thirty-one years after the fact. Wilkie had left the South in 1969 in the wake of the violence surrounding the civil rights movement, vowing never to live there again. But after traveling the world as a reporter, he did return in 1993, drawn by a deep-rooted affinity to the region of his youth. It was as though he rejoined his tribe, a peculiar civilization bonded by accent and mannerisms and burdened by racial anxiety. As Wilkie writes, Southerners have staunchly resisted assimilation since the Civil War, taking an almost perverse pride in their role as "spiritual citizens of a nation that existed for only four years in another century." Wilkie endeavors to make sense of the enormous changes that have typified the South for more than four decades. Full of beauty, humor, and pathos, Dixie is a story of redemption -- for both a region and a writer.

Beyond the Lines Or A Yankee Prisoner Loose in Dixie

... In Chains Again — A Forced March - Before the Court - - A Union Speech in
Dixie - Better Fare - Southern Superstition - A Slave at Prayer . ... as palatable as
frog , that we halted , and concealing ourselves , wearily awaited the fall of night ,
intending to make a foray by starlight . But by four o ' clock a heavy thunderstorm
came up ; and dreading to be again wet , we made our way to an old waste -
house ...

Author: John James Geer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Slaves

Page: 285

View: 556


Life in Dixie s Land Or South in Secession time

Observing the fall in his crockery , and the general confusion of things , my host
quietly asked , “ What ' s to pay ? ... seized him by the throat , yelling , rather than
speaking , these words : “ You — , have you dared to insult a guest in my house ?

Author: James Roberts Gilmore

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 282

View: 282