The Frailty Myth

Can women be equal to men as long as men are physically stronger? And are men, in fact, stronger? These are key questions that Colette Dowling, author of the bestselling The Cinderella Complex, raises in her provocative new book.

Author: Colette Dowling

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 0375758151

Category: Social Science

Page: 0

View: 331

Can women be equal to men as long as men are physically stronger? And are men, in fact, stronger? These are key questions that Colette Dowling, author of the bestselling The Cinderella Complex, raises in her provocative new book. The myth of female frailty, with its roots in nineteenth-century medicine and misogyny, has had a damaging effect on women's health, social status, and physical safety. It is Dowling's controversial thesis that women succumb to societal pressures to appear weak in order to seem more "feminine." The Frailty Myth presents new evidence that girls are weaned from the use of their bodies even before they begin school. By adolescence, their strength and aerobic powers have started to decline unless the girls are exercising vigorously--and most aren't. By sixteen, they have already lost bone density and turned themselves into prime candidates for osteoporosis. They have also been deprived of motor stimulation that is essential for brain growth. Yet as breakthroughs among elite women athletes grow more and more astounding, it begins to appear that strength and physical skill--for all women--is only a matter of learning and training. Men don't have a monopoly on physical prowess; when women and men are matched in size and level of training, the strength gap closes. In some areas, women are actually equipped to outperform men, due partly to differences in body structure, and partly to the newly discovered strengthening benefits of estrogen. Drawing on extensive research in motor development, performance assessment, sports physi-ology, and endocrinology, Dowling presents an astonishing picture of the new physical woman. And she creates a powerful argument that true equality isn't possible until women learn how to stand up for themselves--physically.

The Frailty Myth

Bill has always been on the cutting edge of his profession, and my discussions with him over the years have had a big influence on mythinking and writing. My dear friend Dr. Barbara Koltuv read early work on The Frailty Myth and, ...

Author: Colette Dowling

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1588361268

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 358

Can women be equal to men as long as men are physically stronger? And are men, in fact, stronger? These are key questions that Colette Dowling, author of the bestselling The Cinderella Complex, raises in her provocative new book. The myth of female frailty, with its roots in nineteenth-century medicine and misogyny, has had a damaging effect on women's health, social status, and physical safety. It is Dowling's controversial thesis that women succumb to societal pressures to appear weak in order to seem more "feminine." The Frailty Myth presents new evidence that girls are weaned from the use of their bodies even before they begin school. By adolescence, their strength and aerobic powers have started to decline unless the girls are exercising vigorously--and most aren't. By sixteen, they have already lost bone density and turned themselves into prime candidates for osteoporosis. They have also been deprived of motor stimulation that is essential for brain growth. Yet as breakthroughs among elite women athletes grow more and more astounding, it begins to appear that strength and physical skill--for all women--is only a matter of learning and training. Men don't have a monopoly on physical prowess; when women and men are matched in size and level of training, the strength gap closes. In some areas, women are actually equipped to outperform men, due partly to differences in body structure, and partly to the newly discovered strengthening benefits of estrogen. Drawing on extensive research in motor development, performance assessment, sports physi-ology, and endocrinology, Dowling presents an astonishing picture of the new physical woman. And she creates a powerful argument that true equality isn't possible until women learn how to stand up for themselves--physically.

The Frailty Myth

The Frailty Myth presents new evidence that girls are weaned from the use of their bodies even before they begin school.

Author: Colette Dowling

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 388

Challenging the myth that women are naturally weaker than men, a noted feminist writer traces the history of the concept of female physical inferiority and its long-term repercussions in terms of women's health and social status.

Women s Sports

with the conditions of their nature,” and Brazilian women could not legally play soccer again until 1979.12 For much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, middle- and upper-class women were bound by the myth of female frailty.

Author: Jaime Schultz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190657723

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 890

Although girls and women account for approximately 40 percent of all athletes in the United States, they receive only 4 percent of the total sport media coverage. SportsCenter, ESPN's flagship program, dedicates less than 2 percent of its airtime to women. Local news networks devote less than 5 percent of their programming to women's sports. Excluding Sports Illustrated's annual "Swimsuit Issue," women appear on just 4.9 percent of the magazine's covers. Media is a powerful indication of the culture surrounding sport in the United States. Why are women underrepresented in sports media? Sports Illustrated journalist Andy Benoit infamously remarked that women's sports "are not worth watching." Although he later apologized, Benoit's comment points to more general lack of awareness. Consider, for example, the confusion surrounding Title IX, the U.S. Law that prohibits sex discrimination in any educational program that receives federal financial assistance. Is Title IX to blame when administrators drop men's athletic programs? Is it lack of interest or lack of opportunity that causes girls and women to participate in sport at lower rates than boys and men? In Women's Sports: What Everyone Needs to Know®, Jaime Schultz tackles these questions, along with many others, to upend the misunderstandings that plague women's sports. Using historical, contemporary, scholarly, and popular sources, Schultz traces the progress and pitfalls of women's involvement in sport. In the signature question-and-answer format of the What Everyone Needs to Know® series, this short and accessible book clarifies misconceptions that dog women's athletics and offers much needed context and history to illuminate the struggles and inequalities sportswomen continue to face. By exploring issues such as gender, sexuality, sex segregation, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, media coverage, and the sport-health connection, Schultz shows why women's sports are not just worth watching, but worth playing, supporting, and fighting for.

Women in Sports Breaking Barriers Facing Obstacles 2 volumes

Collette Dowling, The Frailty Myth: Women Approaching Physical Equality (New York: Random House, 2000). 36. Tolvhed, “Sex Dilemmas.” 37. Theberge, “Reflections.” 38. Dowling, The Frailty Myth. 39.

Author: Adrienne N. Milner

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440851255

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 529

View: 121

Covering a breadth of topics surrounding the current state of women in sports, this two-volume collection taps current events, sociological and feminist theory, and recent research to contextualize women's experiences in sports within a patriarchal society and highlight areas for improvement. • Includes contributions from a wide variety of athletes and scholars from around the world and comprises content edited by two editors of different sexes and races • Challenges conventional wisdom surrounding women's place and treatment in sport as female athletes continue to break sex barriers and shatter previous expectations regarding their ability to compete against men • Relates topics of sexism, gender expectations, and discrimination to key issues within the larger social structure

Feministische Ph nomenologie und Hermeneutik

... See The Frailty Myth , pp . 167–8 and 179–80 . Sexing the Body , p . 3. Dowling quotes Laura Wakwitz : „ Sex testing is not an issue of how tall a woman is or what percentage of her mass is composed of muscle ; it is an attempt to ...

Author: Silvia Stoller

Publisher: Königshausen & Neumann

ISBN: 9783826030321

Category: Feminist theory

Page: 316

View: 644


Strong Like Her

“For centuries women have been shackled to a perception of themselves as weak and ineffectual,” Colette Dowling wrote in 2000's The Frailty Myth. “The perception has been nothing less than the emotional and cognitive equivalent of ...

Author: Haley Shapley

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1982120878

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 259

Beautiful and powerful, Strong Like Her presents the awe-inspiring account of women’s athleticism throughout history. Journalist Haley Shapley takes us through the delightful untold history of female strength to understand how we can better encourage—and celebrate—the physical power of women. Part group biography, part cultural history, Strong Like Her delves into the fascinating stories of our muscular foremothers. From the first female Olympian (who entered the chariot race through a loophole) to the circus stars who could lift their husbands above their heads and make it look like “a little light housework with a feather duster,” these brave and brawny women paved the way for the generations to follow. Filled with Sophy Holland’s beautiful por­traits of some of today’s most awe-inspiring ath­letes, including Peloton instructor Robin Arzón, bodybuilder Dana Linn Bailey, actress/dancer Patina Miller, and many others, Strong Like Her celebrates strength in all its forms. Illuminating the lives and accomplish­ments of storied female sports stars—whose con­tributions to society go far beyond their entries in record books—Shapley challenges us to rethink everything we thought we knew about the power of women.

Playing With the Boys

Mark Dyreson, ''American Ideas about Race and Olympic Races from the 1890's to the 1950's: Shattering Myths or Reinforcing ... Colette Dowling, The Frailty Myth: Women Approaching Physical Equality (New York: Random House, 2000) 16–17.

Author: Eileen McDonagh

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195167562

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 585

From small-town life to the national stage, from the boardroom to Capitol Hill, athletic contests help define what we mean in America by success. And by keeping women from playing with the boys on the grounds that they are inherently inferior to men, society relegates them to second-classstatus in American life. In this forcefully argued book, Eileen McDonagh and Laura Pappano show in vivid detail how women have been unfairly excluded from participating in sports on an equal footing with men. Using dozens of colorful examples from the world of contemporary American athletics--girls and women tryingto break through in high school football, ice hockey, wrestling, and baseball, to name just a few--the authors show that sex differences are not sufficient to warrant exclusion in most sports, that success usually entails more than brute strength, and that the special rules for women in many sportsdo not simply reflect the "differences" between the sexes, but actively create and reinforce them. For instance, if women's bodies give them a physiological advantage in endurance sports like the ultra-marathon and distance swimming, why do so many Olympic events--from swimming to skiing to runningto bike racing--have shorter races for women than men? Likewise, why are women's singles games in badminton limited to 11 points while men's singles go to 15? Surely female badminton players can endure four more points. Such rules merely reinforce a "difference" for social--not competitive--purposes. An original and provocative argument to level the athletic playing field, Playing with the Boys issues a clarion call for sex-sensible policies in sports as another important step toward the equality of men and women in our society.

No Slam Dunk

In societies that uphold patriarchal beliefs, there often exists the “frailty myth,” whereby women are thought to be physically and athletically weaker than men. According to the frailty myth, this gender difference is due to the ...

Author: Cheryl Cooky

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813592062

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 370

View: 698

In just a few decades, sport has undergone a radical gender transformation. However, Cheryl Cooky and Michael A. Messner suggest that the progress toward gender equity in sports is far from complete. The continuing barriers to full and equal participation for young people, the far lower pay for most elite-level women athletes, and the continuing dearth of fair and equal media coverage all underline how much still has yet to change before we see gender equality in sports. The chapters in No Slam Dunk show that is this not simply a story of an “unfinished revolution.” Rather, they contend, it is simplistic optimism to assume that we are currently nearing the conclusion of a story of linear progress that ends with a certain future of equality and justice. This book provides important theoretical and empirical insights into the contemporary world of sports to help explain the unevenness of social change and how, despite significant progress, gender equality in sports has been “No Slam Dunk.”

Sportswomen in Cinema

Film and the Frailty Myth Nicholas Chare. indicated by a brief verbal exchange between the Iron and Bliss. Iron compliments Bliss on a vault she performs to avoid colliding with some players prone on the track: 'Nice jump!

Author: Nicholas Chare

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0857738453

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 910

Sportswomen in Cinema considers both documentary and fiction films from a variety of periods and cultures, by directors including Kathryn Bigelow, Gurinder Chadha, Im Soon-rye, George Kukor, Ida Lupino, and Leni Riefenstahl. Drawing from psychoanalytic and phenomenological theories, the book presents a series of landmark close readings of films featuring a variety of different forms of athletic activity, including baseball, basketball, bodybuilding, boxing, climbing, football, rollerderby, surfing, tennis and track and field. In focusing on themes such as gesture, screen space and sound, it moves beyond a purely narrative analysis of sports films. What's more, as well as building on existing scholarship in sports studies to argue that sport should always be conceived of as more than simply competitive, the book also contributes to ongoing efforts in film theory to foster new feminist discourses on sexual difference. The ideas of thinkers such as Judith Butler, Bracha Ettinger, Griselda Pollock and Michel Serres are employed to explore how films featuring female athletes reflect changing perspectives on femininity and sexuality and also, potentially, contribute to transforming our perceptions about sportswomen and cinema. Sportswomen in Cinema is an important addition to the literature of film studies, gender studies and sports studies.