The Gothic Postcolonialism and Otherness

Starting with a re-examination of the role of the colonial/racial Other in mainstream Gothic (colonial) fiction, this book goes on to engage with the problem of narrating the 'subaltern' in the post-colonial context.

Author: T. Khair

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230251048

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 198

View: 505

Starting with a re-examination of the role of the colonial/racial Other in mainstream Gothic (colonial) fiction, this book goes on to engage with the problem of narrating the 'subaltern' in the post-colonial context. It engages with the problems of representing 'difference' in lucid conceptual terms, with much attention to primary texts, and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of colonial discourses as well as postcolonialist attempts to 'write back.' While providing rich readings of Conrad, Kipling, Melville, Emily Brontë, Erna Brodber, Jean Rhys and others, it offers new perspectives on Otherness, difference and identity, re-examines the role of emotions in literature, and suggests productive ways of engaging with contemporary global and postcolonial issues.

The Gothic Postcolonialism and Otherness

Starting with a re-examination of the role of the colonial/racial Other in mainstream Gothic (colonial) fiction, this book goes on to engage with the problem of narrating the 'subaltern' in the post-colonial context.

Author: Tabish Khair

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137547729

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 208

View: 584

Starting with a re-examination of the role of the colonial/racial Other in mainstream Gothic (colonial) fiction, this book goes on to engage with the problem of narrating the 'subaltern' in the post-colonial context. It engages with the problems of representing 'difference' in lucid conceptual terms, with much attention to primary texts, and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of colonial discourses as well as postcolonialist attempts to 'write back.' While providing rich readings of Conrad, Kipling, Melville, Emily Brontë, Erna Brodber, Jean Rhys and others, it offers new perspectives on Otherness, difference and identity, re-examines the role of emotions in literature, and suggests productive ways of engaging with contemporary global and postcolonial issues.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic Volume 3 Gothic in the Twentieth and Twenty First Centuries

But such colonial depictions, as I have underlined in The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness (2009), were often at the core of the colonial and/or European Gothic. Even the Devil, that ultimately negativised Gothic other in the ...

Author: Catherine Spooner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108652077

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 131

The third volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic is the first book to provide an in-depth history of Gothic literature, film, television and culture in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (c. 1896-present). Identifying key historical shifts from the birth of film to the threat of apocalypse, leading international scholars offer comprehensive coverage of the ideas, events, movements and contexts that shaped the Gothic as it entered a dynamic period of diversification across all forms of media. Twenty-three chapters plus an extended introduction provide in-depth accounts of topics including Modernism, war, postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, counterculture, feminism, AIDS, neo-liberalism, globalisation, multiculturalism, the war on terror and environmental crisis. Provocative and cutting edge, this will be an essential reference volume for anyone studying modern and contemporary Gothic culture.

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Readings of the Medieval Orient

H. L. Malchow's Gothic Images of Race in NineteenthCentury Britain demonstrates how “race”34 is an inherently fluid idea ... 36 Khair, The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness, 14. in that most social of all human creations: language.

Author: Liliana Sikorska

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 1501513362

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 355

Travel narratives and historical works shaped the perception of Muslims and the East in the Victorian and post-Victorian periods. Analyzing the discourses on Muslims which originated in the European Middle Ages, the first part of the book discusses the troubled legacy of the encounters between the East and the West and locates the nineteenth-century texts concerning the Saracens and their lands in the liminal space between history and fiction. Drawing on the nineteenth-century models, the second part of the book looks at fictional and non-fictional works of the late twentieth and early twenty-first century which re-established the "Oriental obsession," stimulating dread and resentment, and even more strongly setting the Civilized West against the Barbaric East. Here medieval metaphorical enemies of Mankind – the World, the Flesh and the Devil – reappear in different contexts: the world of immigration, of white women desiring Muslim men, and the present-day "freedom fighters."

New Postcolonial British Genres

29. Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks, trans. by Charles Lam Markmann (London: Paladin, 1972), p. 82. Khair, The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness p. 4. See further Edward W. Said, Orientalism (London: Penguin, 2003).

Author: Sarah Ilott

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137505222

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 206

View: 904

This study analyses four new genres of literature and film that have evolved to accommodate and negotiate the changing face of postcolonial Britain since 1990: British Muslim Bildungsromane, gothic tales of postcolonial England, the subcultural urban novel and multicultural British comedy.

The American Imperial Gothic

... Tabish Khair has made the crucial observation in The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness: Ghosts from Elsewhere (2009) that gothic fiction was not simply a vehicle of enlightenment critique, it was more importantly a 'writing of ...

Author: Johan Hoglund

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131704519X

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 762

The imagination of the early twenty-first century is catastrophic, with Hollywood blockbusters, novels, computer games, popular music, art and even political speeches all depicting a world consumed by vampires, zombies, meteors, aliens from outer space, disease, crazed terrorists and mad scientists. These frequently gothic descriptions of the apocalypse not only commodify fear itself; they articulate and even help produce imperialism. Building on, and often retelling, the British ’imperial gothic’ of the late nineteenth century, the American imperial gothic is obsessed with race, gender, degeneration and invasion, with the destruction of society, the collapse of modernity and the disintegration of capitalism. Drawing on a rich array of texts from a long history of the gothic, this book contends that the doom faced by the world in popular culture is related to the current global instability, renegotiation of worldwide power and the American bid for hegemony that goes back to the beginning of the Republic and which have given shape to the first decade of the millennium. From the frontier gothic of Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly to the apocalyptic torture porn of Eli Roth's Hostel, the American imperial gothic dramatises the desires and anxieties of empire. Revealing the ways in which images of destruction and social upheaval both query the violence with which the US has asserted itself locally and globally, and feed the longing for stable imperial structures, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of popular culture, cultural and media studies, literary and visual studies and sociology.

Transnational and Postcolonial Vampires

If, as Tabish Khair has suggested in The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness (2009), the Gothic is the writing of Otherness, the vampire is perhaps the creature that most frequently has been manifested as the Other in literature and ...

Author: T. Khair

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137272627

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 537

Throughout the ages, vampires have transgressed the borders of gender, race, class, propriety and nations. This collection examines the vampire as a postcolonial and transnational phenomenon that maps the fear of the Other, the ravenous hunger of Empires and the transcultural rifts and intercultural common grounds that make up global society today.

Gothic Invasions

2–3. Darryl Jones, Horror: A Thematic History in Fiction and Film (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2002), pp. 2, 8–9. Tabish Khair, The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness: Ghosts from Elsewhere (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, ...

Author: Ailise Bulfin

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 1786832100

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 834

What do tales of stalking vampires, restless Egyptian mummies, foreign master criminals, barbarian Eastern hordes and stomping Prussian soldiers have in common? As Gothic Invasions explains, they may all be seen as instances of invasion fiction, a paranoid fin-de-siècle popular literary phenomenon that responded to prevalent societal fears of the invasion of Britain by an array of hostile foreign forces in the period before the First World War. Gothic Invasions traces the roots of invasion anxiety to concerns about the downside of Britain’s continuing imperial expansion: fears of growing inter-European rivalry and colonial wars and rebellion. It explores how these fears circulated across the British empire and were expressed in fictional narratives drawing strongly upon and reciprocally transforming the conventions and themes of gothic writing. Gothic Invasions enhances our understanding of the interchange between popular culture and politics at this crucial historical juncture, and demonstrates the instrumentality of the ever-versatile and politically-charged gothic mode in this process.

The Encyclopedia of the Gothic

SEE ALSO: Beckford, William; Imperial Gothic; Postcolonial Gothic; Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. REFERENCES Beckford, W. (1983 [1786]) Vathek. ... Khair, T. (2009) The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness: Ghosts from Elsewhere.

Author: William Hughes

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119210410

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 880

View: 315

The Encylopedia of the Gothic features a series of newly-commissioned essays from experts in Gothic studies that cover all aspects of the Gothic as it is currently taught and researched, along with the development of the genre and its impact on contemporary culture. Comprises over 200 newly commissioned entries written by a stellar cast of over 130 experts in the field Arranged in A-Z format across two fully cross-referenced volumes Represents the definitive reference guide to all aspects of the Gothic Provides comprehensive coverage of relevant authors, national traditions, critical developments, and notable texts that define, shape, and inform the genre Extends beyond a purely literary analysis to explore Gothic elements of film, music, drama, art, and architecture. Explores the development of the genre and its impact on contemporary culture

A Research Guide to Gothic Literature in English

The Gothic, Postcolonialism and Otherness: Ghosts from Elsewhere. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. 198 pp. Ng, Andrew Hock-soon. Interrogating Interstices: Gothic Aesthetics in Postcolonial Asian and Asian American Literature.

Author: Sherri L. Brown

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442277483

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 252

View: 567

The Gothic began as a designation for barbarian tribes, was associated with the cathedrals of the High Middle Ages, was used to describe a marginalized literature in the late eighteenth century, and continues today in a variety of forms (literature, film, graphic novel, video games, and other narrative and artistic forms). Unlike other recent books in the field that focus on certain aspects of the Gothic, this work directs researchers to seminal and significant resources on all of its aspects. Annotations will help researchers determine what materials best suit their needs. A Research Guide to Gothic Literature in English covers Gothic cultural artifacts such as literature, film, graphic novels, and videogames. This authoritative guide equips researchers with valuable recent information about noteworthy resources that they can use to study the Gothic effectively and thoroughly.