The Great Game

By the end, some Russian outposts were within 20 miles of India.This book tells the story of the Great Game through the exploits of the young officers, both British and Russian, who risked their lives playing it.

Author: Peter Hopkirk

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780192802323

Category: Afghan Wars

Page: 562

View: 891

For nearly a century the two most powerful nations on earth - Victorian Britain and Tsarist Russia - fought a secret war in the lonely passes and deserts of Central Asia. Those engaged in this shadowy struggle called it 'The Great Game', a phrase immortalized in Kipling's Kim. When play firstbegan the two rival empires lay nearly 2,000 miles apart. By the end, some Russian outposts were within 20 miles of India.This book tells the story of the Great Game through the exploits of the young officers, both British and Russian, who risked their lives playing it. Disguised as holy men or native horsetraders, they mapped secret passes, gathered intelligence, and sought the allegiance of powerful khans. Some neverreturned.

The Great Game

Describes the nineteenth-century struggle between Britain and Russia for control of Central Asia

Author: Peter Hopkirk

Publisher: Kodansha Globe

ISBN: 9781568360225

Category: History

Page: 565

View: 682

Describes the nineteenth-century struggle between Britain and Russia for control of Central Asia

Mapping the Great Game

The work of explorers, surveyors and spies in the race to conquer Southern Asia is vividly recounted in this history of British imperial cartography.

Author: Riaz Dean

Publisher: Casemate

ISBN: 1612008151

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 411

The work of explorers, surveyors and spies in the race to conquer Southern Asia is vividly recounted in this history of British imperial cartography. In the 19th century, the British and Russian empires were engaged in bitter rivalry for the acquisition of Southern Asian. Although India was the ultimate prize, most of the intrigue and action took place along its northern frontier in Afghanistan, Turkestan and Tibet. Mapping the region and gaining knowledge of the enemy were crucial to the interests of both sides. The Great Trigonometrical Survey of India began in the 18th century with the aim of creating a detailed map of the subcontinent. Under the leadership of George Everest—whose name was later bestowed to the world’s tallest mountain—the it mapped the Great Arc running from the country’s southern tip to the Himalayas. Much of the work was done by Indian explorers known as Pundits. They were the first to reveal the mysteries of the forbidden city of Lhasa, and discover the true course of Tibet’s mighty Tsangpo River. These explorers performed essential information gathering for the British Empire and filled in large portions of the map of Asia. Their adventurous exploits are vividly recounted in Mapping the Great Game.

Flashman in the Great Game

One of literature's most delightful rakes is back in another tale of rollicking adventure and tantalizing seduction. The plucky Flashman's latest escapades are sure to entertain devotees as well as attract new aficionados.

Author: George MacDonald Fraser

Publisher: Signet Book

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 308

View: 826

One of literature's most delightful rakes is back in another tale of rollicking adventure and tantalizing seduction. The plucky Flashman's latest escapades are sure to entertain devotees as well as attract new aficionados.

The Shadow of the Great Game

A radical reassessment in British colonial history by the former ADC to the last Viceroy of British India is important, but Sarila's claim that current Islamic terrorism is partially rooted in Partition has wider implications.

Author: Narendra Singh Sarila

Publisher: Carroll & Graf Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 188

A radical reassessment in British colonial history by the former ADC to the last Viceroy of British India is important, but Sarila's claim that current Islamic terrorism is partially rooted in Partition has wider implications. Historians have underestimated the role of British strategic interests: fears about the USSR's control of Middle Eastern oil wells and access to the Indian Ocean. New material on figures like Gandhi, Jinnah, Mountbatten, Churchill, Attlee, Wavell, and Nehru are offered.

Playing the Great Game

Playing the Great Game explores and analyzes the tension between the British political and military authorities that has been generated by the impact of all these wars.

Author: Edmund Yorke

Publisher: Robert Hale Limited

ISBN: 9780709091967

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 936

Playing the Great Game explores and analyzes the tension between the British political and military authorities that has been generated by the impact of all these wars. It argues that excessive political interference in the conduct of such wars, which is often resource-driven, has been the predominate cause of the many difficulties encountered.


The Great Game Travels in Beloochistan and Sinde

second spans the period between that conflict and the Second Anglo-Afghan War, 1878-80, while the third terminates with the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907, which effectively marked the end of the confrontation.

Author: Henry Pottinger

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415316408

Category: Eastern question (Central Asia)

Page: 423

View: 566

second spans the period between that conflict and the Second Anglo-Afghan War, 1878-80, while the third terminates with the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907, which effectively marked the end of the confrontation.

The Great Game

Engaging and insightful, The Great Game shines a fascinating light on the veiled history of intelligence.

Author: Frederick P. Hitz

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307428702

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 654

In this riveting insider’s account, a former inspector general of the CIA compares actual espionage cases and practices with classic and popular spy fiction, showing that the real world of espionage is nearly always stranger and more complicated than even the best spy fiction.Exploring everything from tradecraft and recruitment to bureaucracy and betrayal, The Great Game contrasts fictional spies created by such authors as John Le Carr?, Tom Clancy and Joseph Conrad with their real-life counterparts from Kim Philby to Aldrich Ames. Drawing on his thirty year career with the CIA, Frederick P. Hitz shows that even the most imaginative authors fail to capture the profound human dilemmas raised by real-life cases. Engaging and insightful, The Great Game shines a fascinating light on the veiled history of intelligence.

The Shadow of the Great Game

How this operation was conceived and carried out forms the theme of this untold story of Indias partition.

Author: Narendra Singh Sarila

Publisher:

ISBN: 9788172238742

Category: Great Britain

Page: 436

View: 235

"The partition of India continues to make the headlines with new facts emerging even today, six decades later. In this untold story of India's partition, Narendra Singh Sarila unearths documents which bring to light the hitherto unexplored link between the partition and British fears about the USSR gaining control of the oil wells of the Middle East, and how the British used religion as a political tool in pursuit of the great game against the Soviet Union. While focusing on the role of several prominent political figures of the era, he also brings out little-known facts about the pressure the US exerted on Britain to grant India her independence. This timely volume offers a radical reassessment of a key moment in the history of the Indian subcontinent."--Book cover.


The Boxer Rebellion and the Great Game in China

" Many scholars brush off the Boxers as an ill-conceived and easily defeated revolt, but the military historian David J. Silbey shows just how close they came to beating back the combined might of all the imperial powers.

Author: David J. Silbey

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1429942576

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 341

The year is 1900, and Western empires—both old and new—are locked in regional entanglements across the globe. The British are losing a bitter war against the Boers while the German kaiser is busy building a vast new navy. The United States is struggling to put down an insurgency in the South Pacific while the upstart imperialist Japan begins to make clear to neighboring Russia its territorial ambition. In China, a perennial pawn in the Great Game, a mysterious group of superstitious peasants is launching attacks on the Western powers they fear are corrupting their country. These ordinary Chinese—called Boxers by the West because of their martial arts showmanship—rise up, seemingly out of nowhere. Foreshadowing the insurgencies of the more recent past, they lack a centralized leadership and instead tap into latent nationalism and deep economic frustration to build their army. Their battle cry: "Support the Qing, exterminate the foreigners." Many scholars brush off the Boxers as an ill-conceived and easily defeated revolt, but the military historian David J. Silbey shows just how close they came to beating back the combined might of all the imperial powers. Drawing on the diaries and letters of allied soldiers and diplomats, Silbey paints a vivid portrait of the short-lived war. Even though their cause ended just as quickly as it began, the bravery and patriotism of the Boxers would inspire Chinese nationalists—including a young Mao Zedong—for decades to come.

The Great Game 1856 1907

His efforts amplify our knowledge of Russia by considering the important influences of local Asian powers. Ultimately, this book disputes the characterization of the Great Game as a proto–Cold War between East and West.

Author: Evgeny Sergeev

Publisher: Woodrow Wilson Center Press / Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN: 9781421408095

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 403

By relating it to other regional actors, Sergeev creates a more accurate view of the game’s impact on later wars and on the shape of post–World War I Asia.

Persia in the Great Game

' Antony Beevor 'Antony Wynn has produced a well-researched and highly readable life of a character who, in his own day, astonished his contemporaries by his courage and his cheek.

Author: Antony Wynn

Publisher: Thistle Publishing

ISBN: 9781910198810

Category:

Page: 532

View: 258

'A vivid reminder of the extraordinary lives and times of those who once played the Great Game. Percy Sykes was one of the ablest, if most controversial, of these. A valuable addition to Great Game literature.' Peter Hopkirk 'A superbly researched and engaginly written biography. Sykes was a character whose exploits even John Buchan would have feared to invent.' Antony Beevor 'Antony Wynn has produced a well-researched and highly readable life of a character who, in his own day, astonished his contemporaries by his courage and his cheek.' John Ure - Times Literary Supplement 'Wynn's writing is clear and vigorous; he wields no ideological agenda - unless an underlying sympathy for Persians counts as such. ... an enjoyable and compelling account of a fascinating life.' Noel Malcolm - Sunday Telegraph 'Where Wynn excels is in his sense of place. He is very good at conjuring up the look of Kerman, Meshed and the Persian landscape. One also gets a strong sense of what it was like for servants of the Raj on the move, with their rubber baths, tent valises, tins of stewed fruit and jars of Bovril, also of their more exotic retinue of farrashes, syces and pish-khedmats.' Robert Irwin - Literary Review 'A well-researched, hard-nosed, and engaging biography.' Financial Times 'Antony Wynn's book is full of marvellous, half-believable tales of bluff and daring.' Sunday Telegraph Percy Sykes began his career with Army Intelligence in India. Their main concern was the threat to India of the Russian advances across Central Asia. In 1893 they sent Sykes into eastern Persia on the first of many expeditions. Always with his terrier and often with his sister or his wife, he rode over thousands of miles of unknown desert, marsh and mountain to map them and establish his network of informants, helped by a Persian prince whom he had met in the desert. Later, as consul in Meshed, Sykes used his wits to foil Russian attempts to take over northern Persia, the key to India. But when the First World War broke out it was Wassmuss - 'the German Lawrence' - who proved the greatest threat to Britain, as Sykes was sent alone to raise an army to defeat him. In the great Victorian tradition, the soldier-diplomat Sykes hunted gazelle with princes, studied Persian poetry, and sat at the feet of dervish masters. This study of Sykes' secret despatches over twenty-five turbulent years gives an unusual insight into the inner workings of Persia, which are little changed in the Iran of today.


The Great Game of Genocide

The book concludes by explaining the ongoing international denial of the genocide as an extension of the historical 'Armenian question', with many of the same considerations governing modern European-American-Turkish interaction as existed ...

Author: Donald Bloxham

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 329

View: 604

The Great Game of Genocide addresses the origins, development and aftermath of the Armenian genocide in a wide-ranging reappraisal based on primary and secondary sources from all the major parties involved. Rejecting the determinism of many influential studies, and discarding polemics on all sides, it founds its interpretation of the genocide in the interaction between the Ottoman empire in its decades of terminal decline, the self-interested policies of the European imperial powers, and the agenda of some Armenian nationalists in and beyond Ottoman territory. Particular attention is paid to the international context of the process of ethnic polarization that culminated in the massive destruction of 1912-23, and especially the obliteration of the Armenian community in 1915-16. The opening chapters of the book examine the relationship between the great power politics of the 'eastern question' from 1774, the narrower politics of the 'Armenian question' from the mid-nineteenth century, and the internal Ottoman questions of reforming the complex social and ethnic order under intense external pressure. Later chapters include detailed case studies of the role of Imperial Germany during the First World War (reaching conclusions markedly different to the prevailing orthodoxy of German complicity in the genocide); the wartime Entente and then the uncomfortable postwar Anglo-French axis; and American political interest in the Middle East in the interwar period which led to a policy of refusing to recognize the genocide. The book concludes by explaining the ongoing international denial of the genocide as an extension of the historical 'Armenian question', with many of the same considerations governing modern European-American-Turkish interaction as existed prior to the First World War.

Tibet

This Book Contains New And Vital Information That The Author Has Gathered From Original Sources In The Foreign Policy Archives Of The Russian Empire And The National Archives Of India And Is A Must For Those Intrested In The History Of ...

Author: Tatiana Shaumian

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 582

This Book Contains New And Vital Information That The Author Has Gathered From Original Sources In The Foreign Policy Archives Of The Russian Empire And The National Archives Of India And Is A Must For Those Intrested In The History Of Tibet And In The Politics Of The `Great Game`.

The Great Game in Cuba

The agency’s shady dealings with a major US publication are uncovered. A testament to the sheer volume of previously classified and untold information, The Great Game in Cuba is a story the world needs to hear.

Author: Joan Mellen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1510707409

Category: History

Page: 492

View: 661

“Joan Mellen tells a brilliantly researched, meticulously supported, and compulsively readable tale that everyone concerned with how America operates should know.” —Samuel R. Delany, author of Dhalgren and Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders This completely revised and newly updated edition of The Great Game in Cuba uses the backdrop of the Cuban Revolution to examine the CIA’s inner workings during the fifties and sixties. Detailing the agency’s lies and deceits, Mellen paints a vivid behind-the-scenes picture of the CIA in Cuba after the Castro revolution: what it wanted and the lengths it was willing to go to paralyze the opposition to Fidel Castro. The game begins with Robert J. Kleberg, Jr., proprietor of the legendary King Ranch, one of the largest ranches in the world. Kleberg’s messianic ambitions bring him to Cuba, where he establishes a satellite ranch managed by his right-hand man, the James Bond–type character Michael J. P. Malone, who secretly reported to both the FBI and to at least five CIA handlers. From there, the plot thickens as an array of Cubans share never-before-revealed information regarding the agency’s activities in Cuba and its attempts to unseat Castro and install a CIA-friendly figurehead in his place. The mysterious disappearance of Camilo Cienfuegos, a major figure in Castro’s government, is told here for the first time. The agency’s shady dealings with a major US publication are uncovered. A testament to the sheer volume of previously classified and untold information, The Great Game in Cuba is a story the world needs to hear.