The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

Featuring a new preface, Oliver Sacks’s The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with perceptual and intellectual disorders: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of ...

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0593466683

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 381

In his most extraordinary book, the bestselling author of Awakenings and "poet laureate of medicine” (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients inhabiting the compelling world of neurological disorders, from those who are no longer able to recognize common objects to those who gain extraordinary new skills. Featuring a new preface, Oliver Sacks’s The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with perceptual and intellectual disorders: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; whose limbs seem alien to them; who lack some skills yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. In Dr. Sacks’s splendid and sympathetic telling, his patients are deeply human and his tales are studies of struggles against incredible adversity. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine’s ultimate responsibility: “the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject.”

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

These are case studies of people who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognise people or common objects.

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781447275404

Category:

Page: 300

View: 995

With an introduction by Will SelfA classic work of psychology, this international bestseller provides a groundbreaking insight into the human mind.If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self - himself - he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it. In this extraordinary book, Dr. Oliver Sacks recounts the stories of patients struggling to adapt to often bizarre worlds of neurological disorder. Here are people who can no longer recognize everyday objects or those they love; who are stricken with violent tics or shout involuntary obscenities; who have been dismissed as autistic or retarded, yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales illuminate what it means to be human. A provocative exploration of the mysteries of the human mind, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat is a million-copy bestseller by the twentieth century's greatest neurologist.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

An instant bestseller, Sacks's 1985 book argues that, by connecting with their patients and pay attention to their stories, doctors can provide significantly more effective care.

Author: Dario Krpan

Publisher: Macat Library

ISBN: 9781912128464

Category: Neurology

Page: 98

View: 590

In The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, neurologist Oliver Sacks looked at the cutting-edge work taking place in his field, and decided that much of it was not fit for purpose. Sacks found it hard to understand why most doctors adopted a mechanical and impersonal approach to their patients, and opened his mind to new ways to treat people with neurological disorders. He explored the question of deciding what such new ways might be by deploying his formidable creative thinking skills. Sacks felt the issues at the heart of patient care needed redefining, because the way they were being dealt with hurt not only patients, but practitioners too. They limited a physician's capacity to understand and then treat a patient's condition. To highlight the issue, Sacks wrote the stories of 24 patients and their neurological clinical conditions. In the process, he rebelled against traditional methodology by focusing on his patients' subjective experiences. Sacks did not only write about his patients in original ways - he attempt to come up with creative ways of treating them as well. At root, his method was to try to help each person individually, with the core aim of finding meaning and a sense of identity despite, or even thanks to, the patients' condition. Sacks thus redefined the issue of neurological work in a new way, and his ideas were so influential that they heralded the arrival of a broader movement - narrative medicine - that placed stronger emphasis on listening to and incorporating patients' experiences and insights into their care.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

They limited a physician’s capacity to understand and then treat a patient’s condition. To highlight the issue, Sacks wrote the stories of 24 patients and their neurological clinical conditions.

Author: Dario Krpan

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1351351451

Category:

Page:

View: 638

In The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, neurologist Oliver Sacks looked at the cutting-edge work taking place in his field, and decided that much of it was not fit for purpose. Sacks found it hard to understand why most doctors adopted a mechanical and impersonal approach to their patients, and opened his mind to new ways to treat people with neurological disorders. He explored the question of deciding what such new ways might be by deploying his formidable creative thinking skills. Sacks felt the issues at the heart of patient care needed redefining, because the way they were being dealt with hurt not only patients, but practitioners too. They limited a physician's capacity to understand and then treat a patient's condition. To highlight the issue, Sacks wrote the stories of 24 patients and their neurological clinical conditions. In the process, he rebelled against traditional methodology by focusing on his patients' subjective experiences. Sacks did not only write about his patients in original ways - he attempt to come up with creative ways of treating them as well. At root, his method was to try to help each person individually, with the core aim of finding meaning and a sense of identity despite, or even thanks to, the patients' condition. Sacks thus redefined the issue of neurological work in a new way, and his ideas were so influential that they heralded the arrival of a broader movement - narrative medicine - that placed stronger emphasis on listening to and incorporating patients' experiences and insights into their care.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales Study Guide

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales Study Guide contains a comprehensive summary and analysis of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks.

Author: Bookrags Com

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781304529336

Category: Education

Page: 68

View: 257

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales Study Guide contains a comprehensive summary and analysis of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks. It includes a detailed Plot Summary, Chapter Summaries & Analysis, Character Descriptions, Objects/Places, Themes, Styles, Quotes, and Topics for Discussion on The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales.



The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks Key Takeaways Analysis Review

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: by Oliver Sacks | Key Takeaways, Analysis & Review Preview: In this 30th anniversary edition of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks, M.D. brings together more than two dozen ...

Author: Instaread

Publisher: Instaread Summaries

ISBN: 1943427992

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 32

View: 812

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat: by Oliver Sacks | Key Takeaways, Analysis & Review Preview: In this 30th anniversary edition of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks, M.D. brings together more than two dozen narratives of patients with many different neurological impairments. The narratives illuminate medical details of the diseases while illustrating how those diseases play out in a patient’s thoughts and actions, bringing a more human aspect to the ailments. These neurological impairments take on many forms. Losses can be highly disruptive to a patient’s life, such as Jimmie G.’s severe memory loss. However, many patients find ways to adapt to their ailments and recoup those losses in other ways, such as Mr. P., a music teacher who lost his ability to distinguish faces and objects, even mistaking his wife for his hat, who learned to sing to himself to keep from becoming disoriented. And MacGregor, who installed a level on his glasses to enable him to stand upright to correct a persistent lean… PLEASE NOTE: This is key takeaways and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat:Overview of the bookImportant PeopleKey TakeawaysAnalysis of Key Takeaways

Summary of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

Inside this Instaread of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat:*Overview of the book*Important People*Key Takeaways*Analysis of Key Takeaways

Author: Instaread Summaries

Publisher: Idreambooks

ISBN: 9781945272363

Category: Psychology

Page: 32

View: 776

Inside this Instaread of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat:* Overview of the book* Important People* Key Takeaways* Analysis of Key Takeaways

Explores neurological disorders and their effects upon the minds and lives of those affected with an entertaining voice.

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher:

ISBN: 9789791159920

Category: Korean language materials

Page: 393

View: 829

Explores neurological disorders and their effects upon the minds and lives of those affected with an entertaining voice.

New York Magazine

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Other Clinical Tales, by Oliver Sacks. Summit; 233 pages; $15.95. DR. P., "A MUSICIAN OF DISTINCTION," IS the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 152

View: 550

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

The Man who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales

... Cataloging in Publication Data Sacks , Oliver W. The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales . Bibliography : p . Includes index .

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 233

View: 389

Presents a series of stories about men and women who, representing both medical and literary oddities, raise fundamental questions about the nature of reality

Religious Language Meaning and Use

3 Oliver Sacks, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1985), 195–213.

Author: Robert K. Bolger

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350059692

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 580

Can the meaning of religious language be separated from its use? In Religious Language, Meaning, and Use, Robert Bolger and Robert Coburn address what has become a contentious though often overlooked account of the relationship between religious belief and religious practice. Through philosophical argumentation and by means of a variety of sermon-like essays on religious topics, this book seeks to return religion to the place in which the meaning and practical impact of its beliefs become inseparable from the life of the believer. Part I begins by considering, through the loose lens of Wittgenstein's philosophical method, how religious language has been misunderstood leading straightway to a variety of challenges and conceptual confusions. Part II presents previously unpublished essays written by Robert C. Coburn who has, for over 50 years, been at the forefront of the study of metaphysics and philosophy of religion. Making a compelling case for a religious practice that avoids trivializing religious belief, this book promises to be a corrective to those who see faith as nothing more than ethics in disguise and to those metaphysicians who see faith as a set of beliefs.

Musicophilia

Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks' latest masterpiece.

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307267911

Category: Psychology

Page: 400

View: 459

Revised and Expanded With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds-for everything but music. Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks' latest masterpiece.

An Anthropologist on Mars

To these seven narratives of neurological disorder Dr. Sacks brings the same humanity, poetic observation, and infectious sense of wonder that are apparent in his bestsellers Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0345805887

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 337

To these seven narratives of neurological disorder Dr. Sacks brings the same humanity, poetic observation, and infectious sense of wonder that are apparent in his bestsellers Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. These men, women, and one extraordinary child emerge as brilliantly adaptive personalities, whose conditions have not so much debilitated them as ushered them into another reality.

The Meaning of Illness

A Phenomenological Account of the Different Perspectives of Physician and Patient S. ... in The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, ...

Author: S. Kay Toombs

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780792324430

Category: Medical

Page: 165

View: 985

This work provides a phenomenological account of the experience of illness and the manner in which meaning is constituted by the patient and the physician. The author provides a detailed account of the way in which illness and body are apprehended differently by doctor and patient. This title has been awarded the first Edwin Goodwin Ballard Prize in Phenomenology.

Psychologies in Revolution

Sacks's best-selling Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1985) focuses on people with right-hemisphere disorders. With injuries to the right hemisphere, ...

Author: Hannah Proctor

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030350282

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 516

This book situates the work of the Soviet psychologist and neurologist Alexander Luria (1902-1977) in its historical context and explores the 'romantic' approach to scientific writing developed in his case histories. Luria consistently asserted that human consciousness was formed by cultural and historical experience. He described psychology as the ‘science of social history’ and his ideas about subjectivity, cognition and mental health have a history of their own. Lines of mutual influence existed between Luria and his colleagues on the other side of the iron curtain, but Psychologies in Revolution also discusses Luria’s research in relation to Soviet history – from the October Revolution of 1917 through the collectivisation of agriculture and Stalinist purges of the 1930s to the Second World War and, finally, the relative stability of the Brezhnev era – foregrounding the often marginalised people with whom Luria’s clinical work brought him into contact. By historicising science and by focusing on a theoretical approach which itself emphasised the centrality of social and political factors for understanding human subjectivity, the book also seeks to contribute to current debates in the medical humanities.

The Music between Us

In The Man Who Mistook His Wifefor a Hat and Other Clinical Tales, 23-42. New York: Harper and Row, 1985. ---. “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.

Author: Kathleen Marie Higgins

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226333272

Category: Music

Page: 291

View: 147

“Higgins’ love of music and cultural variety is evident throughout. She writes in a relaxed, accessible, sophisticated style…Highly recommended.”—Choice From our first social bonding as infants to the funeral rites that mark our passing, music plays an important role in our lives, bringing us closer to one another. In this book, philosopher Kathleen Marie Higgins investigates this role, examining the features of human perception that enable music’s uncanny ability to provoke—despite its myriad forms across continents and throughout centuries—the sense of a shared human experience. Drawing on disciplines such as philosophy, psychology, musicology, linguistics, and anthropology, Higgins’s richly researched study showcases the ways music is used in rituals, education, work, and healing, and as a source of security and—perhaps most importantly—joy. By participating so integrally in such meaningful facets of society, Higgins argues, music situates itself as one of the most fundamental bridges between people, a truly cross-cultural form of communication that can create solidarity across political divides. Moving beyond the well-worn takes on music’s universality, The Music between Us provides a new understanding of what it means to be musical and, in turn, human. “Those who, like Higgins, deeply love music, actually know something about it, have open minds and ears, and are willing to look beyond the confines of Western aesthetics…will find much to learn in The Music between Us.”—Journalof Aesthetics and Art Criticism

The Physiology of Truth

His lucid book explains how the biological revolution has made it possible to ... of The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat : And Other Clinical Tales ISBN ...

Author: Jean-Pierre Changeux

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674012837

Category: Philosophy

Page: 324

View: 570

In this wide-ranging book, one of the boldest thinkers in modern neuroscience confronts an ancient philosophical problem: can we know the world as it really is? Drawing on provocative new findings about the psychophysiology of perception and judgment in both human and nonhuman primates, and also on the cultural history of science, Jean-Pierre Changeux makes a powerful case for the reality of scientific progress and argues that it forms the basis for a coherent and universal theory of human rights. On this view, belief in objective knowledge is not a mere ideological slogan or a naïve confusion; it is a characteristic feature of human cognition throughout evolution, and the scientific method its most sophisticated embodiment. Seeking to reconcile science and humanism, Changeux holds that the capacity to recognize truths that are independent of subjective personal experience constitutes the foundation of a human civil society.

Carnal Thoughts

28 In The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales , Sacks presents the case of a neurologically damaged patient he calls " the ...

Author: Vivian Sobchack

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520241299

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 531

A group of sophisticated essays on how we experience film with all fives senses--and our sense of history .