The Odyssey

'The Odyssey is a poem of extraordinary pleasures: it is a salt-caked, storm-tossed, wine-dark treasury of tales, of many twists and turns, like life itself' Guardian The epic tale of Odysseus and his ten-year journey home after the Trojan ...

Author: Homer

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141965509

Category: Poetry

Page: 416

View: 527

'The Odyssey is a poem of extraordinary pleasures: it is a salt-caked, storm-tossed, wine-dark treasury of tales, of many twists and turns, like life itself' Guardian The epic tale of Odysseus and his ten-year journey home after the Trojan War forms one of the earliest and greatest works of Western literature. Confronted by natural and supernatural threats - ship-wrecks, battles, monsters and the implacable enmity of the sea-god Poseidon - Odysseus must use his bravery and cunning to reach his homeland and overcome the obstacles that, even there, await him. E. V. Rieu's translation of The Odyssey was the very first Penguin Classic to be published, and has itself achieved classic status. Translated by E. V. RIEU Revised translation by D. C. H. RIEU With an Introduction by PETER JONES

The Odyssey of Homer

In this new verse translation, Allen Mandelbaum--celebrated poet and translator of Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy --realizes the power and beauty of the original Greek verse and demonstrates why the epic tale of The Odyssey has ...

Author: Homer

Publisher: Bantam Classics

ISBN: 0553897772

Category: Fiction

Page: 560

View: 770

Homer's epic chronicle of the Greek hero Odysseus' journey home from the Trojan War has inspired writers from Virgil to James Joyce. Odysseus survives storm and shipwreck, the cave of the Cyclops and the isle of Circe, the lure of the Sirens' song and a trip to the Underworld, only to find his most difficult challenge at home, where treacherous suitors seek to steal his kingdom and his loyal wife, Penelope. Favorite of the gods, Odysseus embodies the energy, intellect, and resourcefulness that were of highest value to the ancients and that remain ideals in out time. In this new verse translation, Allen Mandelbaum--celebrated poet and translator of Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy --realizes the power and beauty of the original Greek verse and demonstrates why the epic tale of The Odyssey has captured the human imagination for nearly three thousand years.

The Odyssey

The Odyssey The Tradition , the Singer , the Performance Thomas R. Walsh and Rodney Merrill READING THE ODYSSEY The city of Troy fell over three thousand years ago , at the end of the second millennium before our era .

Author: Homer

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472088546

Category: History

Page: 421

View: 494

Translated into dactylic hexameter, this edition of the Odyssey recaptures the oral-formulaic experience as never before

Chapman s Homer

Homer bidding farewell to his wife, Odysseus bound to the mast, Penelope at the loom, Achilles dragging Hector's body round the walls of Troy - scenes from Homer have been portrayed in every generation.

Author: Homer

Publisher: Wordsworth Editions

ISBN: 9781840221176

Category: Fiction

Page: 976

View: 574

Homer bidding farewell to his wife, Odysseus bound to the mast, Penelope at the loom, Achilles dragging Hector's body round the walls of Troy - scenes from Homer have been portrayed in every generation. Chapman's translations are argued to be two of the liveliest and readable.

Odyssey

This is an Odyssey that will be treasured by a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers alike.

Author: Homer

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781435163102

Category:

Page: 296

View: 629


The Odyssey

The Name Odyssey The Odyssey is named from the Greek form of the name of its hero, Odysseus, just as the Iliad is named from Ilios, the Greek name for the city of Troy, These two poems, written in hexameter verse, stand at the beginning ...

Author:

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1602068267

Category: Fiction

Page: 332

View: 817

For a work that is a foundational text not merely of modern literature but of all of Western civilization, it's surprising how little is known of its origins. The epic adventure The Odyssey was originally told in oral form and may have been written down for the first time in the 8th century BC. We attribute the work to the Greek poet Homer, but little is known about him, or if, indeed, the author was but a single person. What is certain, though, is that The Odyssey is absolutely required reading for anyone who wishes to be considered truly educated and literate even today, nearly three thousand years after it was first written. This replica of 1911 edition presents the 1851 translation by THEODORE ALOIS BUCKLEY (1825-1856), a highly readable rendition of the nine-year journey of the solider Odysseus as he returns home to Ithaca after the Trojan War. It's a compelling translation that makes plain how strikingly modern Homer's writing was, with its nonlinear plot fleshed out by flashbacks and driven as much by the actions of ordinary mortals-even women and slaves!-as it is by men of heroic stature and the gods themselves. As entertaining as it is edifying, this is one of humanity's grandest literary achievements.

The Odyssey

"This is a translation of the epic Greek poem by Homer.

Author: Homer

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293630

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 522

View: 109

"This is a translation of the epic Greek poem by Homer."--Provided by publisher.

The Odyssey

Presents Homer's age-old tale of the wanderings of Odysseus during his ten-year voyage back home to Ithaca after the Trojan War as he overcomes both divine and natural forces. Reissue.

Author: Homer

Publisher: Signet Classics

ISBN: 9780451530684

Category: Fiction

Page: 344

View: 659

Presents Homer's age-old tale of the wanderings of Odysseus during his ten-year voyage back home to Ithaca after the Trojan War as he overcomes both divine and natural forces. Reissue.

Stories From the Odyssey

Such was the versatility, and such the many-sided energy, of the Greek as he appears in the Iliad and Odyssey. And as these two poems contain the elements of all subsequent thought and progress in the Greek nation, so in the typical ...

Author: H. L Havell

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3752361751

Category: Fiction

Page: 160

View: 717

Reproduction of the original: Stories From the Odyssey by H. L Havell

The Odyssey An Instructional Guide for Literature

StoryElement □ Level 1 △ Level 2 Key Discussion Points Setting In The Odyssey, is the Kingdom of the Dead a good place, a bad place, or neither? Explain your answer . What view of the afterlife do we see in The Odyssey?

Author: Jennifer Kroll

Publisher: Teacher Created Materials

ISBN: 1425889948

Category: Education

Page: 72

View: 785

Explore a mythical world and encourage students to analyze various story elements through the fun, challenging activities and lessons provided in this instructional guide for literature. This guide is the perfect tool to aid students in analyzing and comprehending this timeless story. Appealing and challenging cross-curricular lessons and activities incorporate research-based literacy skills to help students become thorough readers. These lessons and activities work in conjunction with the text to teach students how to analyze and comprehend story elements in multiple ways, practice close reading and text-based vocabulary, determine meaning through text-dependent questions, and much more.


Politics through the Iliad and the Odyssey

Concerning dioghenés, the occurrences – both translations and removals – regarding Odysseus provide evidence apt to suggest a similar reading. The total amount and importance of the cases relating to the king of Ithaca undoubtedly make ...

Author: Andrea Catanzaro

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135120565X

Category: Political Science

Page: 195

View: 499

Facing censorship and being confined to the fringes of the political debate of his time, Thomas Hobbes turned his attention to translating Homer’s Iliad and the Odyssey from Greek into English. Many have not considered enough the usefulness of these translations. In this book, Andrea Catanzaro analyses the political value of Hobbes’ translations of Homer’s works and exposes the existence of a link between the translations and the previous works of the Malmesbury philosopher. In doing so, he asks: • What new information concerning Hobbes' political and philosophical thought can be rendered from mere translation? • What new offerings can a man in his eighties at the time offer, having widely explained his political ideas in numerous famous essays and treatises? • What new elements can be deduced in a text that was well-known in England and where there were better versions than the ones produced by Hobbes? Andrea Catanzaro’s commentary and theoretical interpretation offers an incentive to study Hobbes lesser known works in the wider development of Western political philosophy and the history of political thought.

The Odyssey

Odysseus is finally heading home after a long war, but his troubles have just begun.

Author: Louie Stowell

Publisher: Usborne Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 1409585026

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 64

View: 158

Odysseus is finally heading home after a long war, but his troubles have just begun. Terrible dangers are in store, from one-eyed monsters to cannibal kings. Specially written for confident young readers, this dramatic re-telling is a perfect introduction to Homer's epic tale. Includes links to recommended websites to find out more about Ancient Greece. "Crack reading and make confident and enthusiastic readers with this fantastic reading programme." - Julia Eccleshare


Who Let the Gods Out 3 Beyond the Odyssey

Author: Maz Evans

Publisher: Chicken House

ISBN: 1911490176

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 320

View: 929

Elliot's life is spiralling out of control and his mum's health is worsening. The gods are determined to embark on the quest for the third chaos stone. But Elliot has heard of a mythical potion rumoured to cure all ills ... could he save his mum, even if it means sacrificing the fate of the world?

The Odyssey

Homer's great story is retold with simplicity and style, and brought to life in stunning illustrations.

Author: Gillian Cross

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781406345353

Category: Children's stories

Page: 176

View: 107

Homer's great story is retold with simplicity and style, and brought to life in stunning illustrations. It charts the ten year epic voyage of Odysseus as he returns from the Trojan War to his homeland of Ithaca. On his journey he encounters all manner of perils, from the man-eating Cyclops to the deadly lure of the Sirens.

The Odyssey

1947- The Odyssey : an epic of return / William G. Thalmann. p. cm. — (Twayne's masterwork studies ; 100) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-8057-9424-7 — ISBN 0-8057-8564-7 (pbk.) 1. Homer. Odyssey. 2.

Author: William G. Thalmann

Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 153

View: 997

Homer's two great epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, stand as cornerstones not only of Western literature but also of Western thought and culture, for although readers of two millennia have imitated or opposed these works' paradigm of character and action, few have ignored it. Where the Iliad strikes a heavy tone of tragic grandeur, the Odyssey evokes an atmosphere of adventure and fate. The latter work's key figure, Odysseus the restless wanderer, pervades our language and our thinking: his self-defining journey of experience and maturation has remained one of the world's most explored subjects of artistic expression. In his cogent reading of the Odyssey William G. Thalmann argues that, like its hero, the text is impossible to reduce to a single summary or set of oppositions. As presented in Homer's narrative, the polarities of nature versus civilization, war versus peace, action versus word, and force versus metis (intelligence) are fraught with ambiguity. Thalmann singles out in particular the precarious nature of metis, which imbues Odysseus with constructive intelligence but also a dangerous duplicity. Similarly, Thalmann contends that in all his travels Odysseus both inflicts pain and himself suffers after having saved his own life via his cleverness. Aside from its explorations of human character, however, the poem quite simply tells a wonderful story. Odysseus's myriad adventures during his 10-year struggle to get home to Ithaka have the powerful appeal of folktale and fairy tale: the poem's narrative, Thalmann asserts, offers the pleasure of desiring an end that is delayed by obstacles in the outer world and the necessity for intrigues on Ithaka, with the simultaneous assurance that the end will come, and that it will be a happy one. Thalmann perceptively identifies traces of class and gender inquiry in Homer's epic. The poem seems to open up questions about the upholding of a system by which those at the top of society are maintained by the labor of those below, Thalmann maintains; in due course, however, these questions are closed off with the ideal solution of the return of the righteous king, promising prosperity for all. Additionally, Thalmann detects in Penelope an independence and importance rarely accorded women in Greek literature or Greek life; her like-mindedness with Odysseus is emphasized and their marriage characterized as a collaboration between them. What makes Homer's text so relevant to our times, Thalmann concludes, is its suffusion with contradiction and elusiveness. Odysseus, after all, is a hero with a constantly deferred future, and the poem's ending preserves the tension between his two conflicting sides, for when peace is at hand our hero, overcome with battle fury, assaults the relatives of his enemies. Ultimately, Thalmann finds that, happy ending notwithstanding, Homer's masterpiece depicts man's complex and often insidious relationship with the world - a world wherein that which passes for truth seems like fantasy, and lies contain no monsters or miracles but are indistinguishable from the reality of experience.

The Bow and the Lyre

In light of this possibility, Bernardete works back and forth from Homer to Plato to examine the relation between wisdom and justice and tries to recover an original understanding of philosophy that Plato, too, recovered by reflecting on ...

Author: Seth Benardete

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0742565963

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 177

View: 634

In this exciting interpretation of the Odyssey, the late renowned scholar Seth Benardete suggests that Homer may have been the first to philosophize in a Platonic sense. He argues that the Odyssey concerns precisely the relation between philosophy and poetry and, more broadly, the rational and the irrational in human beings. In light of this possibility, Bernardete works back and forth from Homer to Plato to examine the relation between wisdom and justice and tries to recover an original understanding of philosophy that Plato, too, recovered by reflecting on the wisdom of the poet. At stake in his argument is no less than the history of philosophy and the ancient understanding of poetry. The Bow and the Lyre is a book that every classicist and historian of philosophy should have.

The Odyssey of Homer

Homer William Bedell Stanford. Dodds , E . R . : ' Homer ' , pp . 1 - 17 of Platnauer as cited below . Engelmann , R . , and Anderson , W . C . F . : Pictorial Atlas to Homer ' s Iliad and Odyssey , London , 1892 .

Author: Homer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 438


The Odyssey

The hardcover publication of the Odyssey received glowing reviews: The New York Times praised “Mitchell’s fresh, elegant diction and the care he lavishes on meter, [which] brought me closer to the transfigurative experience Keats ...

Author: Homer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451674198

Category: Poetry

Page: 432

View: 769

From Stephen Mitchell, the renowned translator whose Iliad was named one of The New Yorker’s Favorite Books of 2011, comes a vivid new translation of the Odyssey, complete with textual notes and an illuminating introductory essay. The hardcover publication of the Odyssey received glowing reviews: The New York Times praised “Mitchell’s fresh, elegant diction and the care he lavishes on meter, [which] brought me closer to the transfigurative experience Keats describes on reading Chapman’s Homer”; Booklist, in a starred review, said that “Mitchell retells the first, still greatest adventure story in Western literature with clarity, sweep, and force”; and John Banville, author of The Sea, called this translation “a masterpiece.” The Odyssey is the original hero’s journey, an epic voyage into the unknown, and has inspired other creative work for millennia. With its consummately modern hero, full of guile and wit, always prepared to reinvent himself in order to realize his heart’s desire—to return to his home and family after ten years of war—the Odyssey now speaks to us again across 2,600 years. In words of great poetic power, this translation brings Odysseus and his adventures to life as never before. Stephen Mitchell’s language keeps the diction close to spoken English, yet its rhythms recreate the oceanic surge of the ancient Greek. Full of imagination and light, beauty and humor, this Odyssey carries you along in a fast stream of action and imagery. Just as Mitchell “re-energised the Iliad for a new generation” (The Sunday Telegraph), his Odyssey is the noblest, clearest, and most captivating rendition of one of the defining masterpieces of Western literature.