The Paradox of Choice

In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice—the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish—becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being.

Author: Barry Schwartz

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061748998

Category: Psychology

Page: 304

View: 246

Whether we're buying a pair of jeans, ordering a cup of coffee, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, choosing a doctor, or setting up a 401(k), everyday decisions—both big and small—have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we are presented. As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures. In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and perpetual stress. And, in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression. In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice—the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish—becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. In accessible, engaging, and anecdotal prose, Schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice—from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, family, and individual needs—has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse. By synthesizing current research in the social sciences, Schwartz makes the counter intuitive case that eliminating choices can greatly reduce the stress, anxiety, and busyness of our lives. He offers eleven practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, have the discipline to focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and ultimately derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.

The Paradox of Choice

The Paradox of Choice - Why More Is Less is a 2004 book by American psychologist Barry Schwartz. In the book, Schwartz argues that eliminating consumer choices can greatly reduce anxiety for shoppers.

Author: Jesse Russell

Publisher: Book on Demand Limited

ISBN: 9785511287263

Category:

Page: 134

View: 161

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! The Paradox of Choice - Why More Is Less is a 2004 book by American psychologist Barry Schwartz. In the book, Schwartz argues that eliminating consumer choices can greatly reduce anxiety for shoppers. This same issue was first proposed by Jos Ortega y Gasset in Chapter 4 of his book The Revolt of the Masses.

The Paradox of Choice

The author of The Battle for Human Nature explains why too much choice has led to the ever increasing complexity of everyday decisions, why too much of a good thing has become detrimental to human psychological and emotional well-being, and ...

Author: Barry Schwartz

Publisher: Harper Perennial

ISBN: 9780060005696

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 265

View: 778

The author of The Battle for Human Nature explains why too much choice has led to the ever increasing complexity of everyday decisions, why too much of a good thing has become detrimental to human psychological and emotional well-being, and how to focus our lives on making the right choices. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.

The Paradox of Choice

The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.” This story is published under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International ...

Author: Joe Vasicek

Publisher: Joe Vasicek

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 132

A chilling glimpse of an all-too possible future. “In cases where there may be severe deformities… I can tell you exactly what would happen. The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.” This story is published under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0)

THE PARADOX OF CHOICE IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD

Research in the last twenty years has characterized the life course stage of emerging adulthood as a time of unparalleled freedom and an abundance of choice.

Author: Jennifer L. McMillin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ambivalence

Page: 45

View: 304

Research in the last twenty years has characterized the life course stage of emerging adulthood as a time of unparalleled freedom and an abundance of choice. Few researchers, however, have addressed the darker side to emerging adulthood, including the effects an abundance of choice might have on emerging adults' mental health. I drew from existing theory to examine how ambivalence associated with too much choice within the markers of adulthood influenced anxiety. Using data from the fifth interview of The Toledo Adolescent Relationship Study (TARS), I used ordinary least squares regression to examine whether the markers of adulthood, and the choices associated with the markers of adulthood including full-time employment, education completion, sustaining an intimate relationship, and living independently from parents influenced anxiety. Additionally, I examined whether social psychological processes of ambivalence, perceived control, and subjective adulthood mediated the relationship between markers of adulthood and anxiety. The only marker of adulthood found to be significantly and positively associated with anxiety in all models was relationship churning, suggesting that wavering in markers of adulthood is more important in terms of anxiety than actually completing or not completing the markers. Ambivalence sustained a significant and positive relationship with anxiety. Likewise, perceived control, and subjective adulthood remained significantly and negatively associated with anxiety. Ambivalence was found to be moderately high in the sample, and in the initial model which added ambivalence, was found to account for the positive relationship of mother's education being more than high school and anxiety.

Practical Wisdom

How do we get it back? Practical Wisdom can help. "Practical wisdom" is the essential human quality that combines the fruits of our individual experiences with our empathy and intellect-an aim that Aristotle identified millennia ago.

Author: Barry Schwartz

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101475188

Category: Self-Help

Page: 336

View: 485

A reasoned yet urgent call to embrace and protect the essential, practical human quality that has been drummed out of our lives: wisdom. It's in our nature to want to succeed. It's also human nature to want to do right. But we've lost how to balance the two. How do we get it back? Practical Wisdom can help. "Practical wisdom" is the essential human quality that combines the fruits of our individual experiences with our empathy and intellect-an aim that Aristotle identified millennia ago. It's learning "the right way to do the right thing in a particular circumstance, with a particular person, at a particular time." But we have forgotten how to do this. In Practical Wisdom, Barry Schwartz and Kenneth Sharpe illuminate how to get back in touch with our wisdom: how to identify it, cultivate it, and enact it, and how to make ourselves healthier, wealthier, and wiser.

Why We Work

Through fascinating studies and compelling anecdotes, this book dispels this myth.

Author: Barry Schwartz

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476784876

Category: Psychology

Page: 112

View: 509

An eye-opening, groundbreaking tour of the purpose of work in our lives, showing how work operates in our culture and how you can find your own path to happiness in the workplace. Why do we work? The question seems so simple. But Professor Barry Schwartz proves that the answer is surprising, complex, and urgent. We’ve long been taught that the reason we work is primarily for a paycheck. In fact, we’ve shaped much of the infrastructure of our society to accommodate this belief. Then why are so many people dissatisfied with their work, despite healthy compensation? And why do so many people find immense fulfillment and satisfaction through “menial” jobs? Schwartz explores why so many believe that the goal for working should be to earn money, how we arrived to believe that paying workers more leads to better work, and why this has made our society confused, unhappy, and has established a dangerously misguided system. Through fascinating studies and compelling anecdotes, this book dispels this myth. Schwartz takes us through hospitals and hair salons, auto plants and boardrooms, showing workers in all walks of life, showcasing the trends and patterns that lead to happiness in the workplace. Ultimately, Schwartz proves that the root of what drives us to do good work can rarely be incentivized, and that the cause of bad work is often an attempt to do just that. How did we get to this tangled place? How do we change the way we work? With great insight and wisdom, Schwartz shows us how to take our first steps toward understanding, and empowering us all to find great work.

Navigating the New Retail Landscape

The choice paradox is the proposition that more choice can , in fact , lead to
dissatisfaction due to the difficulty of making ' good ' decisions of what to choose .
Therefore , almost infinite choice in an internet - enabled world could lead to
almost ...

Author: Alan Treadgold

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198868766

Category:

Page: 336

View: 810

With over 25 detailed case studies of innovative and successful enterprises, this book offers a robust and practical guide to leaders tasked with understanding and delivering success in the new retail landscape.

The Oxford Handbook of Public Choice

This “paradox of voter turnout” has led some to doubt the appropriateness of the
rational-choice approach in this context.1 Fiorina (1981) dubs it “the paradox that
ate rational choice theory.” Others have reacted to the paradox by adapting the ...

Author: Roger D. Congleton

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 0190469773

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1016

View: 369

"This two-volume collection provides a comprehensive overview of the past seventy years of public choice research, written by experts in the fields surveyed. The individual chapters are more than simple surveys, but provide readers with both a sense of the progress made and puzzles that remain. Most are written with upper level undergraduate and graduate students in economics and political science in mind, but many are completely accessible to non-expert readers who are interested in Public Choice research. The two-volume set will be of broad interest to social scientists, policy analysts, and historians"--

The Paradox of Fiscal Austerity

In the end, the choice of which policy choices had which impact is really what we
want to study, so virtually all related studies attempt to trim the noise to view how
these choices relate to a country's economic wherewithal. The results of their ...

Author: Velez-Hagan Justin

Publisher:

ISBN: 1498571948

Category:

Page: 222

View: 102

If governments followed the optimal fiscal policy path, surpluses in good times would counter necessary deficits during economic downturns, leading to worldwide balance. The world, however, has chosen to go in a different direction in recent decades, avoiding thrift in light of a decidedly more indebted future. When financial crises kicked off a global recession in 2008, the spotlight placed on countries' fiscal conditions put pressure on policymakers around the globe to find a way to slow the growth of deficits and debt by imposing fiscal consolidations (or, more simply, austerity). How have these policies fared across the developed world? Were they even necessary to begin with? This book examines the many factors that have contributed to the success (or failure) of such policies, including timing, magnitude, accompanying policies, composition, and more, while explaining the economic rationale behind their choices.

The Paradox of Plenty

Meticulously documented and theoretically innovative, this book illuminates the manifold factors—economic, political, and social—that determine the nature of the oil state, from the coherence of public bureaucracies, to the degree of ...

Author: Terry Lynn Karl

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520918696

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 272

The Paradox of Plenty explains why, in the midst of two massive oil booms in the 1970s, oil-exporting governments as different as Venezuela, Iran, Nigeria, Algeria, and Indonesia chose common development paths and suffered similarly disappointing outcomes. Meticulously documented and theoretically innovative, this book illuminates the manifold factors—economic, political, and social—that determine the nature of the oil state, from the coherence of public bureaucracies, to the degree of centralization, to patterns of policy-making. Karl contends that oil countries, while seemingly disparate, are characterized by similar social classes and patterns of collective action. In these countries, dependence on petroleum leads to disproportionate fiscal reliance on petrodollars and public spending, at the expense of statecraft. Oil booms, which create the illusion of prosperity and development, actually destabilize regimes by reinforcing oil-based interests and further weakening state capacity. Karl's incisive investigation unites structural and choice-based approaches by illuminating how decisions of policymakers are embedded in institutions interacting with domestic and international markets. This approach—which Karl dubs "structured contingency"—uses a state's leading sector as the starting point for identifying a range of decision-making choices, and ends by examining the dynamics of the state itself.


The Paradox of Christian Tragedy

Thus , free choice is contextually determined as a result of the paradox of
inevitability and choice . The " world " as created is such that no judgment is
passed upon it ; as a given , whether it be good or ill , it is and what happens in
this created ...

Author: Barbara Joan Hunt

Publisher: Whitston Publishing Company Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 147

View: 316

This study examines one of the unresolved problems of literary theory and criticism: whether a given play can be simultaneously a tragedy and ostensibly Christian.

The Paradox of Happiness

Two models of career choice are usually discussed in the literature . The first is a
" rational decision - making process " of choice which describes occupational
choice as a step - by - step process in which individuals assess the job market ...

Author: Kathleen Grove

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Nurse practitioners

Page: 684

View: 220


Journal for the Study of Food and Society

For Levenstein , the paradox is how in a country as abundant in resources as the
United States , people are unable to " enjoy it . " Although he surveys issues of
hunger , Levenstein ' s primary paradox deals with how American food choices ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Food habits

Page:

View: 124


The Pertinence of the Paradox

But a self - conscious choice bespeaks a certain freedom in the midst of the
harshest necessities and constraints of existence . Consequently , daily life is full
of paradox ; it is almost paradox itself . But to be aware of a major choice and its ...

Author: Howard Alexander Slaatte

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Paradox

Page: 268

View: 284



The Paradox of Conscience in Modern Political Thought

The first is the announcement at a social gathering by one of my Catholic friends
that she could no longer vote for any pro - choice candidates . When pressed for
her reasons for this somewhat surprising and certainly unpopular position , she ...

Author: Darren Reed Walhof

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Conscience

Page: 402

View: 547


The Paradox Relational Database Advisor

... you to use Paradox to perform a task without your having to remember all the
steps every time . Once you ' ve created a menu structure ( written the script ) ,
you can ignore the details of the steps , and making a simple choice can allow
input ...

Author: Kimberly Maughan Saunders

Publisher: Windcrest

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 275

View: 450

A guide for entry-level Paradox users--covering version 3.5, 4.0, and Windows. Contains a set of easy-to-follow guidelines for each phase in the database design process, providing specific suggestions for creating systems that meet a wide variety of business needs and hardware environments.

Choice

One of the best and most incisive commentaries , in a huge literature on poverty ,
is Thomas Gladwin , Poverty : U.S.A. ( CHOICE , Apr. 1968 ) ; and further
reference can be made to Sidney Lens , Poverty America's Enduring Paradox (
CHOICE ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Academic libraries

Page:

View: 243