The Road to Dien Bien Phu

This mobilization fortified the single-party state and would create modern Vietnam. This book radically changes how we understand both the first Vietnam War and the one the Americans would fight later.

Author: Christopher Goscha

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691180164

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 729

"On May 7, 1954, when the bullets stopped and the air stilled in Dien Bien Phu, there was no doubt that Vietnam could fight a mighty colonial power-and win. After nearly a decade of war, the country that had been forged in the crucible of the Indochina War had achieved a victory unseen in any other movement for national liberation. In The Road to Dien Bien Phu, historian Christopher Goscha explains the making of this extraordinary battle, telling the first comprehensive history of how Vietnam brought down the French in the Indochina War. Between September 1945, when Ho Chi Minh declared modern Vietnam's birth, and May 1954, Vietnam moved from a decentralized guerilla polity to a single-party militarized state. Goscha illuminates the making of the militarized nervous system that would realize the victory at Dien Bien Phu. But he is also attuned to how society mobilized behind war communism. This mobilization fortified the single-party state and would create modern Vietnam. This book radically changes how we understand both the first Vietnam War and the one the Americans would fight later. Shedding light on a larger arc of communist warfare and statecraft that runs from the former Soviet Union to the communist states of China and North Korea, Goscha tells a global story of how Vietnam came to be"--

The Road to Dien Bien Phu

Starting in November 1953, and even earlier in some places, work teams began repairing and widening roads running to Dien Bien Phu through the Tuan Giao interchange: from southern China's Yunnan province via Lai Chau, from Zones III and ...

Author: Christopher Goscha

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691228655

Category: History

Page: 568

View: 806

A multifaceted history of Ho Chi Minh’s climactic victory over French colonial might that foreshadowed America’s experience in Vietnam On May 7, 1954, when the bullets stopped and the air stilled in Dien Bien Phu, there was no doubt that Vietnam could fight a mighty colonial power and win. After nearly a decade of struggle, a nation forged in the crucible of war had achieved a victory undreamed of by any other national liberation movement. The Road to Dien Bien Phu tells the story of how Ho Chi Minh turned a ragtag guerrilla army into a modern fighting force capable of bringing down the formidable French army. Taking readers from the outbreak of fighting in 1945 to the epic battle at Dien Bien Phu, Christopher Goscha shows how Ho transformed Vietnam from a decentralized guerrilla state based in the countryside to a single-party communist state shaped by a specific form of “War Communism.” Goscha discusses how the Vietnamese operated both states through economics, trade, policing, information gathering, and communications technology. He challenges the wisdom of counterinsurgency methods developed by the French and still used by the Americans today, and explains why the First Indochina War was arguably the most brutal war of decolonization in the twentieth century, killing a million Vietnamese, most of them civilians. Panoramic in scope, The Road to Dien Bien Phu transforms our understanding of this conflict and the one the United States would later enter, and sheds new light on communist warfare and statecraft in East Asia today.

Dien Bien Phu 1954

Here, author Martin Windrow describes how from their first assaults on 13 March 1954, the battle quickly developed into a dramatic 56-day 'Stalingrad in the jungle' that drew the attention of the world.

Author: Martin Windrow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472843983

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 356

In late 1953, the seventh year of France's war against the Viet Minh insurgency in its colony of Vietnam, the C-in-C, General Navarre, was encouraged to plant an 'air-ground base' in the Thai Highlands at Dien Bien Phu, to distract General Giap's Vietnamese People's Army from both Annam and the French northern heartland in the Red River Delta, and to protect the Laotian border. Elite French paratroopers captured Dien Bien Phu, which was reinforced between December 1953 and February 1954 with infantry and artillery, a squadron of tanks and one of fighter-bombers, to a strength of 10,000 men. Giap and the VPA General Staff accepted the challenge of a major positional battle; through a total mobilization of national resources, and with Chinese logistical help, they assembled a siege army of 58,000 regular troops, equipped for the first time with 105mm artillery and 37mm AA guns. Here, author Martin Windrow describes how from their first assaults on 13 March 1954, the battle quickly developed into a dramatic 56-day 'Stalingrad in the jungle' that drew the attention of the world.

The Last Valley

In December 1953 the French army occupying Vietnam challenged the elusive Vietnamese army to engage in a decisive battle.

Author: Martin Windrow

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786737492

Category: History

Page: 752

View: 540

In December 1953 the French army occupying Vietnam challenged the elusive Vietnamese army to engage in a decisive battle. When French paratroopers landed in the jungle on the border between Vietnam and Laos, the Vietnamese quickly isolated the French force and confronted them at their jungle base in a small place called Dien Bien Phu. The hunters-the French army-had become the hunted, desperately defending their out-gunned base. The siege in the jungle wore on as defeat loomed for the French. Eventually the French were depleted, demoralized, and destroyed. As they withdrew, the country was ominously divided at U.S. insistence, creating the short-lived Republic of South Vietnam for which 55,000 Americans would die in the next twenty years.


Dien Bien Phu

In Indochina, if the 6 March agreement had been fully honoured by Paris, the disastrous following seven years could have been avoided and the French military not set upon the road to Dien Bien Phu. 6. FRANCE'S EXPEDITIONARY FORCE France ...

Author: Anthony Tucker-Jones

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1526708000

Category: Political Science

Page: 128

View: 408

When the world held its breath It is 25 years since the end of the Cold War, now a generation old. It began over 75 years ago, in 1944long before the last shots of the Second World War had echoed across the wastelands of Eastern Europewith the brutal Greek Civil War. The battle lines are no longer drawn, but they linger on, unwittingly or not, in conflict zones such as Iraq, Somalia and Ukraine. In an era of mass-produced AK-47s and ICBMs, one such flashpoint was French Indochina At the end of the Second World War France sought to reassert its military prestige, but instead suffered humiliating defeat at Dien Bien Phu in French colonial Indochina. The First Indochina war became a textbook example of how not to conduct counterinsurgency warfare against nationalist guerrillas. Anthony Tucker-Jones guides the reader through this decisive conflict with a concise text and contemporary photographs, providing critical insight into the conduct of the war by both sides and its wider ramifications.The Viet Minh, after resisting the Japanese in Indochina, sought independence for Vietnam from France. The French, with limited military resources, moved swiftly to reassert control in 1945, sparking a decade-long conflict. French defense of Hanoi rested on holding the Red River Delta, making it a key battleground. When the Viet Minh invaded neighboring Laos the French deployed to fight a set-piece battle at Dien Bien Phu, in 1954, but instead were trapped. All relief attempts failed and French defenses were slowly overwhelmed. America considered coming to the garrisons rescue using nuclear weapons, but instead left it to its fate, which set the scene for the Algerian and the Vietnam conflicts.

Valley of the Shadow

Using these sources, complemented by interviews with French veterans and research in the French Army and French Foreign Legion archives, this book, now publishing in paperback, provides a new telling of the climactic battle in the Indochina ...

Author: Kevin Boylan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472824385

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 459

Following the end of World War II, France attempted to reassert control over its colonies in Indochina. In Vietnam, this was resisted by the Viet Minh leading to the First Indochina War. By 1954, the French army was on the defensive and determined to force the Viet Minh into a decisive set-piece battle at Dien Bien Phu. Over the past five decades, Western authors have generally followed a standard narrative of the siege of Dien Bien Phu, depicting the Viet Minh besiegers as a faceless horde which overwhelmed the intrepid garrison by sheer weight of numbers, superior firepower, and logistics. However, a wealth of new Vietnamese-language sources tell a very different story, revealing for the first time the true Viet Minh order of battle and the details of the severe logistical constraints within which the besiegers had to operate. Using these sources, complemented by interviews with French veterans and research in the French Army and French Foreign Legion archives, this book, now publishing in paperback, provides a new telling of the climactic battle in the Indochina War, the conflict that set the stage for the Vietnam War a decade later.

Vietnam Dream Trip

Deo Van Long's House was originally a plush colonial mansion on Road 127 to Muong Te on the opposite bank ofthe Da River from ... In 1993 the status of capital of Lai Chau Province was transferred from Lai Chau town to Dien Bien Phu, ...

Author: Claire Boobbyer

Publisher: Footprint Travel Guides

ISBN: 1907263683

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 342

During your valuable holidays, you will want to experience the heart of Vietnam. Footprint’s Dream Trip Vietnam will ensure you discover the very best this paradoxical destination has to offer as well as take you to some fantastic out-of-the-way places hand-picked by the author. From the best places to contemplate ancient pagodas and temples, to navigating the charming city of Hanoi which teems with contrasts, this new guide is packed full of ideas, suggestions and expert advice to help you design your own dream trip. • Packed with detailed information on where to go and what to do • A hand-picked selection of the very best places to stay and to eat • Full-colour trip-planning section featuring detailed itineraries and maps • Off-the-beaten track suggestions from the author • Compact, pocket-sized format so you can carry it with you • Written by a local expert offering you insider information Footprint’s carefully tailored information ensures that you get the most out of your dream trip.

Dien Bien Phu

His account is a personal one - that of a man who shared meals and wine and danger with the doomed soldiers. A much-published defense expert, Simpson is uniquely qualified to tell the dramatic story of this famous last stand.

Author: Howard R. Simpson

Publisher: Potomac Books Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 193

View: 758

The fighting began in November 1953, when French paratroopers seized a small airstrip in northwestern Vietnam. It ended in May 1954 with tens of thousands of Vietminh troops overrunning the besieged garrison. A third of the 15,000 defenders died in combat; fewer than a hundred escaped into the jungle. Thousands more died in captivity. Dien Bien Phu is recognized as one of history's great battles and as a turning point for American policy: the French defeat led to the fateful U.S. commitment to Vietnam. Ironically, the U.S. military repeated many of the French mistakes. American Howard R. Simpson was there as a combat reporter and photographer. His account is a personal one - that of a man who shared meals and wine and danger with the doomed soldiers. A much-published defense expert, Simpson is uniquely qualified to tell the dramatic story of this famous last stand. Aided by interviews with dozens of survivors from both sides - including victorious Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap - his book will rank with Bernard Fall's bestselling Hell in a Very Small Place as a classic work on an event as significant for the United States as it was for France. Dien Bien Phu is being published on the fortieth anniversary of the French defeat and contains rare combat photos by the author and the French Foreign Legion.

Lonely Planet Laos

For travellers, the province's most visited settlement is Muang Khua, a useful transit point linked by river to Nong Khiaw and by road to Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam. Further north the province is kept well off the standard tourist trail ...

Author: Lonely Planet

Publisher: Lonely Planet

ISBN: 1787010619

Category: Travel

Page: 584

View: 363

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Laos is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Whiz through the jungle on ziplines in Bokeo Nature Reserve, dine on French cuisine in historic Luang Prabang, or trek to minority villages on the Bolaven Plateau; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Laos and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Laos Travel Guide: Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - history, environment, wildlife, religion, culture, music, literature, film, dance, architecture, handicrafts, sport, politics Over 40 maps Covers Vientiane, Luang Prabang, Vang Vieng, Luang Namtha, Phonsavan, Xieng Khuang, Hua Phan, Ban Phanom, Paksan, Savannakhet, Pakse, Champasak, Si Phan Don and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Laos, our most comprehensive guide to Laos, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos & Northern Thailand; and Southeast Asia on a Shoestring guides. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves. The world awaits! Lonely Planet guides have won the TripAdvisor Traveler's Choice Award in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. 'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' -- Fairfax Media 'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times Important Notice: The digital edition of this book may not contain all of the images found in the physical edition.