The Sacred Cause

A political history of the abolition of slavery in Brazil, this book looks closely at both Afro-Brazilian political mobilization and parliamentary politics to shed light on the origins of the Abolitionist movement and its impact on race ...

Author: Jeffrey Needell

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781503609020

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 265

A political history of the abolition of slavery in Brazil, this book looks closely at both Afro-Brazilian political mobilization and parliamentary politics to shed light on the origins of the Abolitionist movement and its impact on race relations in Brazil.

The Sacred Cause of Union

The Sacred Cause of Union Iowa In the CIvIl war B a k e r r t h o M a s r . University of Iowa Press, Iowa City UnIversIty of Iowa press, Iowa cIty 52242 Copyright © 2016. Verso r Runningfoot • iii.

Author: Thomas R. Baker

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609384350

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 121

The Sacred Causeof Union highlights Iowans’ important role in reuniting the nation when the battle over slavery tore it asunder. In this first-ever survey of the state’s Civil War history, Thomas Baker interweaves economics, politics, army recruitment, battlefield performance, and government administration. Scattered across more than a dozen states and territories, Iowa’s fighting men marched long distances and won battles against larger rebel armies despite having little food or shelter and sometimes poor equipment. On their own initiative, the state’s women ventured south to the battlefields to tend to the sick and injured, and farm families produced mountains of food to feed hungry federal armies. In the absence of a coordinated military supply system, women’s volunteer organizations were instrumental in delivering food, clothing, medicines, and other supplies to those who needed them. All of these efforts contributed mightily to the Union victory and catapulted Iowa into the top circle of most influential states in the nation. To shed light on how individual Iowans experienced the war, the book profiles six state residents. Three were well-known. Annie Wittenmyer, a divorced woman with roots in Virginia, led the state’s efforts to ship clothing and food to the soldiers. Alexander Clark, a Muscatine businessman and the son of former slaves, eloquently championed the rights of African Americans. Cyrus Carpenter, a Pennsylvania-born land surveyor anxious to make his fortune, served in the army and then headed the state’s Radical Republican faction after the war, ultimately being elected governor. Three never became famous. Ben Stevens, a young, unemployed carpenter, fought in an Iowa regiment at Shiloh, and then transferred to a Louisiana African American regiment so that he could lead the former slaves into battle. Farm boy Abner Dunham defended the Sunken Road at the Battle of Shiloh, before spending seven grim months in Confederate prison camps. The young Charles Musser faced pressure from his neighbors to enlist and from his parents to remain at home to work on the farm. Soon after he signed on to serve the Union, he discovered that his older brother had joined the Confederate Army. Through the letters and lives of these six Iowans, Thomas Baker shows how the Civil War transformed the state at the same time that Iowans transformed the nation.

Darwin s Sacred Cause

Explores the important influence of abolitionism and Darwin's hatred of slavery on the development of his theory of evolution, in a study that examines the scientist's theories about human origins.

Author: Adrian J. Desmond

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780226144511

Category: Science

Page: 485

View: 179

Explores the important influence of abolitionism and Darwin's hatred of slavery on the development of his theory of evolution, in a study that examines the scientist's theories about human origins.

Darwin s Sacred Cause

No sophistry could 'palliate the magnitude and misery of the system' or lessen the 'sacred importance of the cause'. This was 'the great cause of humanity'. The resolution had been carried unanimously. To students like Darwin, ...

Author: Adrian Desmond

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547527756

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 153

An “arresting” and deeply personal portrait that “confront[s] the touchy subject of Darwin and race head on” (The New York Times Book Review). It’s difficult to overstate the profound risk Charles Darwin took in publishing his theory of evolution. How and why would a quiet, respectable gentleman, a pillar of his parish, produce one of the most radical ideas in the history of human thought? Drawing on a wealth of manuscripts, family letters, diaries, and even ships’ logs, Adrian Desmond and James Moore have restored the moral missing link to the story of Charles Darwin’s historic achievement. Nineteenth-century apologists for slavery argued that blacks and whites had originated as separate species, with whites created superior. Darwin, however, believed that the races belonged to the same human family. Slavery was therefore a sin, and abolishing it became Darwin’s sacred cause. His theory of evolution gave a common ancestor not only to all races, but to all biological life. This “masterful” book restores the missing moral core of Darwin’s evolutionary universe, providing a completely new account of how he came to his shattering theories about human origins (Publishers Weekly, starred review). It will revolutionize your view of the great naturalist. “An illuminating new book.” —Smithsonian “Compelling . . . Desmond and Moore aptly describe Darwin’s interaction with some of the thorniest social and political issues of the day.” —Wired “This exciting book is sure to create a stir.” —Janet Browne, Aramont Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University, and author of Charles Darwin: Voyaging