The Scramble For Africa

The Scramble for Africa is the first full-scale study of that extraordinary episode in history.

Author: Thomas Pakenham

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0349141932

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 297

In 1880 the continent of Africa was largely unexplored by Europeans. Less than thirty years later, only Liberia and Ethiopia remained unconquered by them. The rest - 10 million square miles with 110 million bewildered new subjects - had been carved up by five European powers (and one extraordinary individual) in the name of Commerce, Christianity, 'Civilization' and Conquest. The Scramble for Africa is the first full-scale study of that extraordinary episode in history.

The Scramble for Africa

This book offers a clear and concise account of the ‘scramble’ or ‘race’ for Africa, the period of around 20 years during which European powers carved up the continent with little or no consultation of its inhabitants.

Author: M. E. Chamberlain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317862554

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 140

In 1870 barely one tenth of Africa was under European control. By 1914 only about one tenth – Abyssinia (Ethiopia) and Liberia – was not. This book offers a clear and concise account of the ‘scramble’ or ‘race’ for Africa, the period of around 20 years during which European powers carved up the continent with little or no consultation of its inhabitants. In her classic overview, M.E. Chamberlain: Contrasts the Victorian image of Africa with what we now know of African civilisation and history Examines in detail case histories from Egypt to Zimbabwe Argues that the history and background of Africa are as important as European politics and diplomacy in understanding the 'scramble' Considers the historiography of the topic, taking into account Marxist and anti-Marxist, financial, economic, political and strategic theories of European imperialism This indispensible introduction, now in a fully updated third edition, provides the most accessible survey of the ‘scramble for Africa’ currently available. The new edition includes primary source material unpublished elsewhere, new illustrations and additional pedagogical features. It is the perfect starting point for any study of this period in African history.

The Scramble for Africa

Charts the distinct phases of imperialism from the early colonisation, the development of `spheres of influence', to the rise of strong anti-imperialist reaction at home.

Author: Muriel Evelyn Chamberlain

Publisher: Longman Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Africa

Page: 182

View: 304

Charts the distinct phases of imperialism from the early colonisation, the development of `spheres of influence', to the rise of strong anti-imperialist reaction at home.


The Scramble for Africa

The Zulu were not dealt with by treaty, and their history is perhaps the subject of another episode of this series, but the amaNdebele were, and early European treaty and concession gatherers were required to tread with great caution as ...

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781548048600

Category:

Page: 82

View: 428

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts of the scramble *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "The British South-African Company's shares May be at a discount-(Trade-martyrs!-trade-martyrs!)- But he, our Colossus, strides on, he declares, Whether with or without chums or charters-or charters. Hooray! We brave Britons are right now to the front- Provided we've someone to boss us-to boss us; And Scuttlers will have their work cut out to shunt This stalwart, far-striding Colossus-Colossus!" - Excerpt from an editorial in Punch, December 10, 1892 The modern history of Africa was, until very recently, written on behalf of the indigenous races by the white man, who had forcefully entered the continent during a particularly hubristic and dynamic phase of European history. In 1884, Prince Otto von Bismark, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together, to deal with Africa's colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This event-known as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885-galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa. The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty. This began a rush, spearheaded mainly by European commercial interests in the form of Chartered Companies, to penetrate the African interior and woo its leadership with guns, trinkets and alcohol, and having thus obtained their marks or seals upon spurious treaties, begin establishing boundaries of future European African colonies. The ease with which this was achieved was due to the fact that, at that point, traditional African leadership was disunited, and the people had just staggered back from centuries of concussion inflicted by the slave trade. Thus, to usurp authority, to intimidate an already broken society, and to play one leader against the other was a diplomatic task so childishly simple, the matter was wrapped up, for the most part, in less than a decade. There were some exceptions to this, however, the most notable of which was perhaps the Zulu Nation, a centralized monarchy of enormous military prowess that required a British colonial war, the much storied Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, to affect pacification. Another was the amaNdebele, an offshoot of the Zulu, established as early as the 1830s in the southeastern quarter of what would become Rhodesia, and later still, Zimbabwe, in the future. Both were powerful, centralized monarchies, fortified by an organized and aggressive professional army, subdivided into regiments, and owing fanatical loyalty to the crown. The Zulu were not dealt with by treaty, and their history is perhaps the subject of another episode of this series, but the amaNdebele were, and early European treaty and concession gatherers were required to tread with great caution as they entered their lands. It would be a long time before the inevitable course of history forced the amaNdebele to submit to European domination. Although treaties and British gunboat diplomacy played a role, it was ultimately war, conquest, and defeat in battle that brought the amaNdebele to heel. Despite this, the amaNdebele, notwithstanding their eventual military defeat, commanded enormous respect from the British. This was also true with the Zulu. The British were a martial nation themselves, and they saw the concept of the "Noble Savage" as the romance of a bygone age, offering up the esteem due to a ruling aristocracy, according to the rules of chivalry. With the defeat of the amaNdebele in 1893.

Italian National Identity in the Scramble for Africa

This book is an essential contribution to debates on the relationship between European national identity and culture and imperialism in the late 19th century.

Author: Giuseppe Maria Finaldi

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9783039118038

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 444

Italy's First African War (1880-1896) pitted a young and ambitious European nation against the ancient Empire of Ethiopia. The Least of Europe's Great Powers rashly assailed Africa's most formidable military power. The outcome was humiliating defeat for Italy and the survival, uniquely for any African nation in the years of the European Scramble for that continent, of Ethiopian independence. Notwithstanding Italy's disastrous first experience in the colonial fray, this book argues that the impact of the war went well beyond the battlefields of the Ethiopian highlands and reached into the minds of the Italian people at home. Through a detailed and exhaustive study of Italian popular culture, this book asks how far the First African War impacted on the Italian nation-building project and how far Italians were themselves changed by undergoing the experience of war and defeat in East Africa. Finaldi argues, for the first time in historiography on the subject, that there was substantial support for and awareness of Italy's military campaign and that 'Empire', as has come to be regarded as fundamental in the histories of other European countries, needs to be brought firmly into the mainstream of Italian national history. This book is an essential contribution to debates on the relationship between European national identity and culture and imperialism in the late 19th century.


Scramble for Africa

The Scramble for Africa, likewise called the partition of Africa, or the conquest of Africa, was the intrusion, addition, division, and colonization of the majority of Africa by seven Western European powers during a brief period known as ...

Author: Kevin Daniels

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 0

View: 292

The Scramble for Africa, likewise called the partition of Africa, or the conquest of Africa, was the intrusion, addition, division, and colonization of the majority of Africa by seven Western European powers during a brief period known as New imperialism . The 10% of Africa that was under proper European control in 1870 expanded to very nearly 90% by 1914, with just Ethiopia (Abyssinia) and Liberia staying autonomous, however Ethiopia would later be attacked and involved by Italy. Th book was written to: Broaden our knowledge of African history Understand Europeans activities in Africa prior independence Know why Africans are still attached to European Understand why Africa still remains third world countries.

The Scramble for Africa

The Scramble for Africa The ' scramble for Africa ' is a metaphor applied by historians to the period of very rapid annexation of the African continent by the European Powers in the last two decades of the nineteenth century .

Author: Robin Brooke-Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1349089958

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 457

The extended plan of the series is designed in response to the changing trends in history examinations at 18 plus, which now demand the study of documentary sources and the testing of historical skills. Each volume, similar in format to the earlier books in the series, concentrates on a particular topic within a narrower time span. A general introduction to the period in question is followed by eight sections dealing with a major theme. Each section consists of an introduction, a series of documents to illustrate the theme (drawn mainly from primary sources) and sets of questions following groups of documents. The student is thus introduced to a wider range of sources than that to be found in the standard textbook.

King Leopold s Congo and the Scramble for Africa

General Histories of Colonialism Before and During the “Scramble for Africa” albert adu Boahen. African Perspectives on Colonialism. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989. Muriel evelyn Chamberlain. The Scramble for Africa ...

Author: Michael A. Rutz

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1624666582

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 604

"King Leopold of Belgium's exploits up the Congo River in the 1880s were central to the European partitioning of the African continent. The Congo Free State, Leopold's private colony, was a unique political construct that opened the door to the savage exploitation of the Congo's natural and human resources by international corporations. The resulting 'red rubber' scandal—which laid bare a fundamental contradiction between the European propagation of free labor and 'civilization' and colonial governments' acceptance of violence and coercion for productivity's sake—haunted all imperial powers in Africa. Featuring a clever introduction and judicious collection of documents, Michael Rutz's book neatly captures the drama of one king's quest to build an empire in Central Africa—a quest that began in the name of anti-slavery and free trade and ended in the brutal exploitation of human lives. This volume is an excellent starting point for anyone interested in the history of colonial rule in Africa." —Jelmer Vos, University of Glasgow