The Scramble For Africa

The Scramble for Africa is the first full-scale study of that extraordinary episode in history.

Author: Thomas Pakenham

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0349141932

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 218

In 1880 the continent of Africa was largely unexplored by Europeans. Less than thirty years later, only Liberia and Ethiopia remained unconquered by them. The rest - 10 million square miles with 110 million bewildered new subjects - had been carved up by five European powers (and one extraordinary individual) in the name of Commerce, Christianity, 'Civilization' and Conquest. The Scramble for Africa is the first full-scale study of that extraordinary episode in history.

The Scramble for Africa

The Zulu were not dealt with by treaty, and their history is perhaps the subject of another episode of this series, but the amaNdebele were, and early European treaty and concession gatherers were required to tread with great caution as ...

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781548048600

Category:

Page: 82

View: 803

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts of the scramble *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "The British South-African Company's shares May be at a discount-(Trade-martyrs!-trade-martyrs!)- But he, our Colossus, strides on, he declares, Whether with or without chums or charters-or charters. Hooray! We brave Britons are right now to the front- Provided we've someone to boss us-to boss us; And Scuttlers will have their work cut out to shunt This stalwart, far-striding Colossus-Colossus!" - Excerpt from an editorial in Punch, December 10, 1892 The modern history of Africa was, until very recently, written on behalf of the indigenous races by the white man, who had forcefully entered the continent during a particularly hubristic and dynamic phase of European history. In 1884, Prince Otto von Bismark, the German chancellor, brought the plenipotentiaries of all major powers of Europe together, to deal with Africa's colonization in such a manner as to avoid provocation of war. This event-known as the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885-galvanized a phenomenon that came to be known as the Scramble for Africa. The conference established two fundamental rules for European seizure of Africa. The first of these was that no recognition of annexation would granted without evidence of a practical occupation, and the second, that a practical occupation would be deemed unlawful without a formal appeal for protection made on behalf of a territory by its leader, a plea that must be committed to paper in the form of a legal treaty. This began a rush, spearheaded mainly by European commercial interests in the form of Chartered Companies, to penetrate the African interior and woo its leadership with guns, trinkets and alcohol, and having thus obtained their marks or seals upon spurious treaties, begin establishing boundaries of future European African colonies. The ease with which this was achieved was due to the fact that, at that point, traditional African leadership was disunited, and the people had just staggered back from centuries of concussion inflicted by the slave trade. Thus, to usurp authority, to intimidate an already broken society, and to play one leader against the other was a diplomatic task so childishly simple, the matter was wrapped up, for the most part, in less than a decade. There were some exceptions to this, however, the most notable of which was perhaps the Zulu Nation, a centralized monarchy of enormous military prowess that required a British colonial war, the much storied Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, to affect pacification. Another was the amaNdebele, an offshoot of the Zulu, established as early as the 1830s in the southeastern quarter of what would become Rhodesia, and later still, Zimbabwe, in the future. Both were powerful, centralized monarchies, fortified by an organized and aggressive professional army, subdivided into regiments, and owing fanatical loyalty to the crown. The Zulu were not dealt with by treaty, and their history is perhaps the subject of another episode of this series, but the amaNdebele were, and early European treaty and concession gatherers were required to tread with great caution as they entered their lands. It would be a long time before the inevitable course of history forced the amaNdebele to submit to European domination. Although treaties and British gunboat diplomacy played a role, it was ultimately war, conquest, and defeat in battle that brought the amaNdebele to heel. Despite this, the amaNdebele, notwithstanding their eventual military defeat, commanded enormous respect from the British. This was also true with the Zulu. The British were a martial nation themselves, and they saw the concept of the "Noble Savage" as the romance of a bygone age, offering up the esteem due to a ruling aristocracy, according to the rules of chivalry. With the defeat of the amaNdebele in 1893.

The Scramble for Africa

This book offers a clear and concise account of the ‘scramble’ or ‘race’ for Africa, the period of around 20 years during which European powers carved up the continent with little or no consultation of its inhabitants.

Author: M. E. Chamberlain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317862554

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 750

In 1870 barely one tenth of Africa was under European control. By 1914 only about one tenth – Abyssinia (Ethiopia) and Liberia – was not. This book offers a clear and concise account of the ‘scramble’ or ‘race’ for Africa, the period of around 20 years during which European powers carved up the continent with little or no consultation of its inhabitants. In her classic overview, M.E. Chamberlain: Contrasts the Victorian image of Africa with what we now know of African civilisation and history Examines in detail case histories from Egypt to Zimbabwe Argues that the history and background of Africa are as important as European politics and diplomacy in understanding the 'scramble' Considers the historiography of the topic, taking into account Marxist and anti-Marxist, financial, economic, political and strategic theories of European imperialism This indispensible introduction, now in a fully updated third edition, provides the most accessible survey of the ‘scramble for Africa’ currently available. The new edition includes primary source material unpublished elsewhere, new illustrations and additional pedagogical features. It is the perfect starting point for any study of this period in African history.

The Scramble for Africa

Uses case histories from Egypt to Zimbabwe to explore the European conquest and partition of Africa, contrasting the Victorian image of Africa with the results of twentieth-century research on the history of the continent.

Author: Muriel Evelyn Chamberlain

Publisher: Seminar Studies in History

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 666

Uses case histories from Egypt to Zimbabwe to explore the European conquest and partition of Africa, contrasting the Victorian image of Africa with the results of twentieth-century research on the history of the continent.

The New Scramble for Africa

China's part in this story has loomed particularly large in recent years, and the American military footprint on the continent has also expanded.

Author: Pádraig Carmody

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509507116

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 326

View: 837

Once marginalized in the world economy, Africa today is a major global supplier of crucial raw materials like oil, uranium and coltan. China's part in this story has loomed particularly large in recent years, and the American military footprint on the continent has also expanded. But a new scramble for resources, markets and territory is now taking place in Africa involving not just state, but non state-actors, including Islamic fundamentalist and other rebel groups. The second edition of Pádraig Carmody's popular book explores the dynamics of the new scramble for African resources, markets, and territory and the impact of current investment and competition on people, the environment, and political and economic development on the continent. Fully revised and updated throughout, its chapters explore old and new economic power interests in Africa; oil, minerals, timber, biofuels, land, food and fisheries; and the nature and impacts of Asian and South African investment in manufacturing and other sectors. The New Scramble for Africa will be essential reading for students of African studies, international relations and resource politics, as well as anyone interested in current affairs.


The Scramble for Africa

The extended plan of the series is designed in response to the changing trends in history examinations at 18 plus, which now demand the study of documentary sources and the testing of historical skills.

Author:

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1349089958

Category:

Page: 144

View: 350




The Scramble for Europe

In this book, Stephen Smith focuses on ‘young Africa’ – 40 per cent of its population are under fifteen – anda dramatic demographic shift. Today, 510 million people live inside EU borders, and 1.25 billion people in Africa.

Author: Stephen Smith

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 150953458X

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 779

From the harrowing situation of migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean in rubber dinghies to the crisis on the US-Mexico border, mass migration is one of the most urgent issues facing our societies today. At the same time, viable solutions seem ever more remote, with the increasing polarization of public attitudes and political positions. In this book, Stephen Smith focuses on ‘young Africa’ – 40 per cent of its population are under fifteen – anda dramatic demographic shift. Today, 510 million people live inside EU borders, and 1.25 billion people in Africa. In 2050, 450 million Europeans will face 2.5 billion Africans – five times their number. The demographics are implacable. The scramble for Europe will become as inexorable as the ‘scramble for Africa’ was at the end of the nineteenth century, when 275 million people lived north and only 100 million lived south of the Mediterranean. Then it was all about raw materials and national pride, now it is about young Africans seeking a better life on the Old Continent, the island of prosperity within their reach. If Africa’s migratory patterns follow the historic precedents set by other less developed parts of the world, in thirty years a quarter of Europe’s population will beAfro-Europeans. Addressingthe question of how Europe cancope with an influx of this magnitude, Smith argues for a path between the two extremes of today’s debate. He advocatesmigratory policies of ‘good neighbourhood’ equidistant from guilt-ridden self-denial and nativist egoism. This sobering analysis of the migration challenges we now face will be essential reading for anyone concerned with the great social and political questions of our time.

The Arabs and the Scramble for Africa

This book examines the history of the European Scramble for Africa from the perspective of the Omanis and other Arabs in East Africa.

Author: John C. Wilkinson

Publisher: Equinox

ISBN: 9781781790687

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 772

This book examines the history of the European Scramble for Africa from the perspective of the Omanis and other Arabs in East Africa. It will be of interest not only to African specialists, but also those working on the Middle East, where awareness is now emerging that the history of those settled on the southern peripheries of Arabia has been intimately entwined with Indian Ocean maritime activities since pre-Islamic times. The nineteenth century, however, saw these maritime borderlands being increasingly drawn into a new world economy, one of whose effects was the development of an ivory front in the interior of the continent that, by the 1850s, led the Omanis and Swahili to establish themselves on the Upper Congo. A reconstruction of their history and their interaction with Europeans is a major theme of this book. European colonial rivalries in Africa is not a subject in vogue today, while the Arabs are still largely viewed as invaders and slavers. The fact that the British separated the Sultanates of Muscat and Zanzibar is reflected in European research so that historians have little grasp of the geographic, tribal and religious continuum that persisted between overseas empire and the Omani homeland. Ibadism is regarded as irrelevant to the mainstream of Islamic religious protest whereas, during the lead up to establishing direct colonial rule, its ideology played a significant role; even the final rally against the Belgians in the Congo was conducted in the name of an Imam al-Muslimin. Back home, the fallout from the British massacre that crushed the last Arab attempt to reassert independence in Zanzibar was an important contributory cause towards the re-founding of an Imamate that survived until the mid-1950s.


King Leopold s Congo and the Scramble for Africa

This volume is an excellent starting point for anyone interested in the history of colonial rule in Africa." —Jelmer Vos, University of Glasgow

Author: Michael A. Rutz

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1624666582

Category: History

Page: 136

View: 690

"King Leopold of Belgium's exploits up the Congo River in the 1880s were central to the European partitioning of the African continent. The Congo Free State, Leopold's private colony, was a unique political construct that opened the door to the savage exploitation of the Congo's natural and human resources by international corporations. The resulting 'red rubber' scandal—which laid bare a fundamental contradiction between the European propagation of free labor and 'civilization' and colonial governments' acceptance of violence and coercion for productivity's sake—haunted all imperial powers in Africa. Featuring a clever introduction and judicious collection of documents, Michael Rutz's book neatly captures the drama of one king's quest to build an empire in Central Africa—a quest that began in the name of anti-slavery and free trade and ended in the brutal exploitation of human lives. This volume is an excellent starting point for anyone interested in the history of colonial rule in Africa." —Jelmer Vos, University of Glasgow

Extracting Profit

Extracting profit explains why Africa, in the first decade and a half of the twenty-first century, has undergone an economic boom.

Author: Lee Wengraf

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608468763

Category: Political Science

Page: 300

View: 547

Extracting profit explains why Africa, in the first decade and a half of the twenty-first century, has undergone an economic boom. This period of “Africa rising” did not lead to the creation of jobs but has instead fueled the growth of the extraction of natural resources and an increasingly-wealthy African ruling class.

Italian National Identity in the Scramble for Africa

This book is an essential contribution to debates on the relationship between European national identity and culture and imperialism in the late 19th century.

Author: Giuseppe Maria Finaldi

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9783039118038

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 514

Italy's First African War (1880-1896) pitted a young and ambitious European nation against the ancient Empire of Ethiopia. The Least of Europe's Great Powers rashly assailed Africa's most formidable military power. The outcome was humiliating defeat for Italy and the survival, uniquely for any African nation in the years of the European Scramble for that continent, of Ethiopian independence. Notwithstanding Italy's disastrous first experience in the colonial fray, this book argues that the impact of the war went well beyond the battlefields of the Ethiopian highlands and reached into the minds of the Italian people at home. Through a detailed and exhaustive study of Italian popular culture, this book asks how far the First African War impacted on the Italian nation-building project and how far Italians were themselves changed by undergoing the experience of war and defeat in East Africa. Finaldi argues, for the first time in historiography on the subject, that there was substantial support for and awareness of Italy's military campaign and that 'Empire', as has come to be regarded as fundamental in the histories of other European countries, needs to be brought firmly into the mainstream of Italian national history. This book is an essential contribution to debates on the relationship between European national identity and culture and imperialism in the late 19th century.



The Scramble for Art in Central Africa

This book is about the expeditions from Europe and North America to collect African art objects at the turn of the century.

Author: Enid Schildkrout

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521586788

Category: Art

Page: 257

View: 264

This book is about the expeditions from Europe and North America to collect African art objects at the turn of the century.


Archives of Empire

DIVA collection of original writings and documents from British colonialism in Africa./div ldquo;Archives of Empireoffers a valuable and original intervention in contemporary studies of imperialism, providing a rich array of source material ...

Author: Barbara Harlow

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822331896

Category: History

Page: 844

View: 228

DIVA collection of original writings and documents from British colonialism in Africa./div