The Silmarillion

This second edition features a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien describing his intentions for the book, which serves as a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages of Middle-earth.

Author: J.R.R. Tolkien

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547951981

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 405

A number-one New York Times bestseller when it was originally published, THE SILMARILLION is the core of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing, a work whose origins stretch back to a time long before THE HOBBIT. Tolkien considered THE SILMARILLION his most important work, and, though it was published last and posthumously, this great collection of tales and legends clearly sets the stage for all his other writing. The story of the creation of the world and of the the First Age, this is the ancient drama to which the characters in THE LORD OF THE RINGS look back and in whose events some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The three Silmarils were jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves. Within them was imprisoned the Light of the Two Trees of Valinor before the Trees themselves were destroyed by Morgoth, the first Dark Lord. Thereafter, the unsullied Light of Valinor lived on only in the Silmarils, but they were seized by Morgoth and set in his crown, which was guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. THE SILMARILLION is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his kindred against the gods, their exile from Valinor and return to Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all their heroism, against the great Enemy. This second edition features a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien describing his intentions for the book, which serves as a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages of Middle-earth.

The Silmarillion Voyagerassics

" -- "Time" With a new cover Tolkien considered "The Silmarillion" his most important work, and, though it was published last and posthumously, this great collection of tales and legends clearly sets the stage for all his other writing.

Author: J. R. R. Tolkien

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780007124398

Category: Fantasy fiction

Page: 365

View: 838

"Majestic . . . Readers of "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" will find in "The Silmarillion" a cosmology to call their own, medieval romances, fierce fairy tales, and fiercer wars that ring with heraldic fury . . . It overwhelms the reader." -- "Time " The story of the creation of the world and of the First Age, this is the ancient drama to which the characters in "The Lord of the Rings" look back and in whose events some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The three Silmarils were jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves. Within them was imprisoned the Light of the Two Trees of Valinor before the Trees themselves were destroyed by Morgoth, the first Dark Lord. Thereafter, the unsullied Light of Valinor lived on only in the Silmarils, but they were seized by Morgoth and set in his crown, which was guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. "The Silmarillion" is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his kindred against the gods, their exile from Valinor and return to Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all their heroism, against the great Enemy. "A creation of singular beauty . . . magnificent in its best moments." --" Washington Post " "Heart-lifting . . . a work of power, eloquence and noble vision . . . Superb " -- "Wall Street Journal "

The Silmarillion

SUMMARY: The tales of The Silmarillion were the underlying inspiration and source of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing; he worked on the book throughout his life but never brought it to a final form.

Author: J. R. R. Tolkien; Christopher Tolkien; Ted Nasmith

Publisher: The New York Times® Best Sellers: Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 865

SUMMARY: The tales of The Silmarillion were the underlying inspiration and source of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing; he worked on the book throughout his life but never brought it to a final form. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings, it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien's world, the ancient drama to which characters in The Lord of the RIngs look back and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The title Silmarillion is shortened from Quenta Silmarillion, "The History of the Silmarils," the three great jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves, in which he imprisoned the light of the Two Trees that illumined Valinor, the land of the gods. When Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, destroyed the Trees, that light lived on only in the Silmarils; Morgoth seized them and set them in his crown, guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. The Silmarillion is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his people against the gods, their exile in Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all the heroisim of Elves and Men, against the great Enemy. The book includes several other, shorter works beside The Silmarillion proper. Preceding it are "Ainulindale," the myth of Creation, and "Valaquenta," in which the nature and powers of each of the gods is set forth. After The Silmarillion is "Akallabeth," the story of the downfall of the great island kingdom of Numenor at the end of the Second Age; completing the volume is "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age," in which the events of The Lord of the Rings are treated in the manner of The Silmarillion. This new edition of The Silmarillion contains the revised and corrected "second edition" text and, by way of introduction, a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1951, which provides a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages. It also contains almost fifty full-color illustrations by the artist Ted Nasmith, many of which appear for the first time.

The Silmarillion

Tales and legends chronicling the world's beginnings and the happenings of the First Age, focusing on the theft of the Simarils--the three jewels crafted by Fèeanor--by Morgoth, first Dark Lord of Middle-earth.

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618126989

Category: Fiction

Page: 365

View: 368

Tales and legends chronicling the world's beginnings and the happenings of the First Age, focusing on the theft of the Simarils--the three jewels crafted by Fèeanor--by Morgoth, first Dark Lord of Middle-earth.

Tolkien the Silmarillion

"In Tolkien and the Silmarillion, Clyde S. Kilby spins his remembrance of a summer's close personal acquaintance with J. R. R. Tolkien into an intimate portrait of the writer whose mythic universe has kindled the imagination of a vast ...

Author: Clyde S. Kilby

Publisher: Shaw

ISBN:

Category: Fantasy fiction, English

Page: 89

View: 702

"In Tolkien and the Silmarillion, Clyde S. Kilby spins his remembrance of a summer's close personal acquaintance with J. R. R. Tolkien into an intimate portrait of the writer whose mythic universe has kindled the imagination of a vast audience. Here Kilby not only provides a rich diversity of clues to the content of that looked-for magnum opus, The Silmarillion, but elaborates on Tolkien's personal and literary relationships with his contemporaries, C. S. Lewis and Charles Williams." --



Study Guide

This 111-page guide for "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R. Tolkien includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 28 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis.

Author: Supersummary

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781693298783

Category:

Page: 112

View: 211

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 111-page guide for "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R. Tolkien includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 28 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like Good Versus Evil and Religion and Mythology.


The Good News of the Return of the King

645 Wood, Gospel According to Tolkien, ch. 1, loc. 454. 646 Tolkien, The
Silmarillion, 6. 647 1 Cor 15:45–49. 648 KJV translation. 649 Mark 15:34 quoting
Ps 22:1, NIV. 650 Lewis, “Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings,” in Lewis, On Stories,
138.

Author: Michael T. Jahosky

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1725263149

Category: Religion

Page: 244

View: 517

Although many people today reject Christianity for intellectual reasons, greater numbers of people are rejecting Christianity because it does not engage their imagination. Christians must not only demonstrate that the Christian worldview is true, but that it is also good, beautiful, and relevant. The Good News of the Return of the King: The Gospel in Middle-earth is a book that endeavors to show the truth, goodness, and beauty of Jesus Christ, the gospel, and the biblical metanarrative by engaging the imagination through J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, as well as The Hobbit and The Silmarillion. In this book, I propose that J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings is a story about what Jesus' parables are about: the good news about the return of the king. As a work of imaginative fiction similar to Jesus' parables, The Lord of the Rings can bypass both intellectual and imaginative objections to the gospel and pull back the "veil of familiarity" that obscures the gospel for many.


The Complete Guide to Middle earth

This is an A-Z guide to the names, places and events in the fantasy world of J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Middle-Earth, the world in which the stories take place, is as real and complex as our own.

Author: Robert Foster

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0261102524

Category: Fantasy fiction, English

Page: 441

View: 213

This is an A-Z guide to the names, places and events in the fantasy world of J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Middle-Earth, the world in which the stories take place, is as real and complex as our own. Events, geography and names were created with care and loving attention by Tolkien, who wanted every single detail of his books to fit into their total pattern. A belief in perfection, the fun of the sub-creation and the desire to create something totally convincing involved him in map-making, endless charts of dates and events and the development of his many invented languages.

ThirdWay

Critique John Pridmore THE SILMARILLION J. R. R. Tolkien Allen and Unwin,
365pp., £4.95 I have a friend who claims that his life was saved by hobbits. I am
not sure I disbelieve him. Tolkien himself taught that the reading of fantasy
requires ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 20

View: 334

Monthly current affairs magazine from a Christian perspective with a focus on politics, society, economics and culture.

Splintered Light

body of scholarship is beginning to accrue for The Silmarillion, critical opinion
seems still to be weighted in favor of The Lord of the Rings. One of the most acute
and perceptive of Tolkien scholars, T. A. Ship- pey, himself a medievalist and ...

Author: Verlyn Flieger

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873387446

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 838

J. R. R. Tolkien is perhaps best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but it is in The Silmarillion that the true depth of Tolkien's Middle-earth can be understood. The Silmarillion was written before, during, and after Tolkien wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. A collection of stories, it provides information alluded to in Tolkien's better known works and, in doing so, turns The Lord of the Rings into much more than a sequel to The Hobbit, making it instead a continuation of the mythology of Middle-earth. Verlyn Flieger's expanded and updated edition of Splintered Light, a classic study of Tolkien's fiction first published in 1983, examines The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings in light of Owen Barfield's linguistic theory of the fragmentation of meaning. Flieger demonstrates Tolkien's use of Barfield's concept throughout the fiction, showing how his central image of primary light splintered and refracted acts as a metaphor for the languages, peoples, and history of Middle-earth.

A Brief Guide to J R R Tolkien

He had also presented Unwin with what he considered to be his masterwork, The
Silmarillion, several times. Plainly, Unwin was not keen to publish it and Tolkien
feared that The Lordofthe Rings was not comprehensible without it.Thetwo were
 ...

Author: Nigel Cawthorne

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1780338600

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 377

A very readable overview of Tolkien and his work, incorporating a brief biography, an examination of the books and a look at the process of filming his work, including The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings saga. It explores how Tolkien's background as a medievalist and linguist informed the languages of Middle-earth, the influence of his Catholicism and Tolkien's legacy in fantasy. A timely book to coincide with the first of Peter Jackson's two keenly awaited Hobbit films.

The Silmarillion

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 91.

Author: Books Group Staff

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN: 9781157662969

Category:

Page: 64

View: 414

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 91. Chapters: Characters in The Silmarillion, Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age, Akallab th, Ungoliant, Gil-galad, Manw, Valaquenta, E rendil, Glorfindel, Varda, F anor, Aul, Ulmo, Elros, Celebrimbor, Nienna, Finw, Oss, Elwing, Ainulindal, Glaurung, Beren, L thien, Melian, Thingol, Finrod Felagund, Finarfin, Maedhros, Caranthir, Fingolfin, Barahir, Angrod, Orodreth, Sauron, T rin Turambar, Morgoth, Galadriel, Quenta Silmarillion, Red Book of Westmarch, Elrond, Hador, C rdan, H rin, Easterlings, Ni nor N niel, E l, Tuor, Beleg, Morwen, Brandir, Maglor, Curufin, Eru Il vatar, Idril, Dior Eluch l, Celegorm, Aredhel, Finduilas, Fingon, Maeglin, Voronw, Erendis, B or, Turgon, Marach, Huor, Ecthelion of the Fountain, Carcharoth, Lalaith, Amras, M m, E nw, Haleth, Gorlim, Halmir, Aerin, R an, Mablung, Dorlas, Haldir, Arien, Amrod, Uinen, Tilion, Ilmar, Nimloth, Elur d and Elur n, Salmar, Thuringwethil. Excerpt: Sauron (pronounced ) is the primary antagonist and titular character of the epic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. In the same work, he is revealed to be the same character as "the Necromancer" from Tolkien's earlier novel The Hobbit. In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also revealed to have been the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth. Tolkien noted that the "angelic" powers of his constructed myth "were capable of many degrees of error and failing," but by far the worst was "the absolute Satanic rebellion and evil of Morgoth and his satellite Sauron." The cosmological myth prefixed to The Silmarillion explains how the supreme being Eru initiated his creation by bringing into being innumerable spirits, "the offspring of his thought," who were with him before anything else had been made. The being later known as Sauron...

Summary Silmarillion Elvish Murder Porn

This book is an unauthorized summary and literary criticism of the plot and characters of J.R.R. Tolkien's almost-novel "The Silmarillion", with a detailed chapter by chapter analysis.

Author: Steven Gordon

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781976720345

Category:

Page: 79

View: 506

This book is an unauthorized summary and literary criticism of the plot and characters of J.R.R. Tolkien's almost-novel "The Silmarillion", with a detailed chapter by chapter analysis. It is written humorously, but covers a lot of serious topics.Most people who think of The Silmarillion, if they think of it at all, think of it as an uncompleted work of J.R.R. Tolkien, written in pieces many years before the Lord of the Rings but never finished. It reads like a historical appendix with thick, descriptive paragraphs and relatively little dialogue.But what is it really? If you dig into it, The Silmarillion is really ELVISH MURDER PORN. It's the story of the suffering, torture, and murder of large numbers of elves, and, sometimes for a little variety, the suffering, torture, and murder of large numbers of men. You may think it's just a fairy tale, and that's how fairy tales are written. But in most fairy tales the good guys aren't slaughtered over and over. In most fairy tales nearly all the main characters do not die in spectacularly horrible deaths, which is what the Silmarillion is all about. Tolkien creates big, extended families of elves and describes how each one dies, usually in combination with humiliation and/or betrayal and/or immense frustration. I have to wonder if Tolkien conceived this as elvish murder porn, that is, entertainment for people who love to read about the suffering and death of elves, and this analysis will go through the book step by step and explore the unusual nature of it.

J R R Tolkien s Sanctifying Myth

58. 59. 60. chapter, “The Manuscript of THE SILMARILLION,” p. 81, WCWC, Kilby
Files, 1–12, TOLKIEN AND THE SILMARILLION. Quoted in Carpenter, Tolkien,
64. Carpenter, ed., Letters, 7–8. See, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, 246–55.

Author: Bradley J. Birzer

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1497648912

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 245

View: 789

Since the appearance of The Lord of the Rings in 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien’s works have always sold briskly, appealing to a wide and diverse audience of intellectuals, religious believers, fantasy enthusiasts, and science fiction aficionados. Now, Peter Jackson’s film version of Tolkien’s trilogy—with its accompanying Rings-related paraphernalia and publicity—is playing a unique role in the dissemination of Tolkien’s imaginative creation to the masses. Yet, for most readers and viewers, the underlying meaning of Middle-earth has remained obscure. Bradley Birzer has remedied that with this fresh study. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle-earth, Birzer explains the surprisingly specific religious symbolism that permeates Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. He also explores the social and political views that motivated the Oxford don, ultimately situating Tolkien within the Christian humanist tradition represented by Thomas More and T. S. Eliot, Dante and C. S. Lewis. Birzer argues that through the genre of myth Tolkien created a world that is essentially truer than the one we think we see around us every day, a world that transcends the colorless disenchantment of our postmodern age. “A small knowledge of history,” Tolkien once wrote, “depresses one with the sense of the everlasting weight of human iniquity.” As Birzer demonstrates, Tolkien’s recognition of evil became mythologically manifest in the guise of Ringwraiths, Orcs, Sauron, and other dark beings. But Tolkien was ultimately optimistic: even weak, bumbling hobbits and humans, as long as they cling to the Good, can finally prevail. Bradley Birzer has performed a great service in elucidating Tolkien’s powerful moral vision.

Tolkien and Sanskrit second Expanded Edition

This is "The Director''s Cut," as a cinematographically minded wag termed it.

Author: Mark T. Hooker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781540435484

Category: Middle Earth (Imaginary place)

Page: 262

View: 722

This is "The Director''s Cut," as a cinematographically minded wag termed it. This study is based on the observation that Tolkien calqued the names of the Sapta Sindhavah (Seven Rivers) from the Rig Veda as the Seven Rivers of Ossiriand. In other words, Tolkien created seven Elvish river names that mean the same thing as the river names of the Sapta Sindhavah. Much has been said of Tolkien''s use of Welsh, Old English, Gothic, Icelandic, Russian, Greek, and Latin. Little, however, has been said about Tolkien''s use of Sanskrit (Refined Speech), the great-great-...grandfather of all the languages above. Sanskrit was spoken in the second millennium B.C. in the valley of the River Indus, the river that put the "Indo" in the name Proto-Indo-European, a linguistic term for the *reconstructed common ancestor of the European languages. All indications to the contrary (C&G ii, 461), there is little doubt about Tolkien''s knowledge of Sanskrit from the point of view of a linguist. It is de rigueur for any serious philologist interested in etymologies like Tolkien. Tolkien was on the Language side of the English School at Oxford, where he took Comparative Philology as a special subject for Honour Moderations. (G&G ii, 758) In a certain sense, Tolkien''s The Silmarillion can be considered a veiled member of the genre of Raj Literature. The names of The Silmarillion say that in the same way that the names in Tolkien''s poem "The Mewlips" are masks that hide the fact that it is a poem about World War I. As the present study shows, the names of The Silmarillion say that the locus of Tolkien''s "Mythology for England" (C&G ii, 244-248) is the India of the British Raj. A literary analysis of Tolkien''s place in Raj Literature is, however, much more speculative than the linguistic analysis that makes up the core of this study, which stands on solid philological ground. The literary analysis will, therefore, be left to another time and place. While the basis of Tolkien''s calque of the names of the Seven Rivers as Ossiriand is Vedic in concept, the superstructure that Tolkien builds upon this foundation is non-Vedic. Some elements of the superstructure are more readily attributable to historical sources, like the history of the India Campaign of Alexander the Great, and the history of the British Raj in India, both of which were a part of the school curriculum when Tolkien was growing up. While the analysis of some of the words | names in this study would not be believable in stand-alone articles, in the context of the coherent structure of words and names presented here, they are worthy of serious consideration. The discovery presented here has the potential to more clearly define the linguistic and philosophical cradle of Tolkien''s ''Mythology for England,'' which was always The Silmarillion, and never The Lord of the Rings. It is Proto-Indo-European in the same way that the English language stems from Proto-Indo-European. That does not, however, mean that there is no gap between Proto-Indo-European language and culture, and the language and culture of The Shire. The analysis that follows is not a rehash of the discredited ideas of The Shores of Middle-earth (1981). It is instead, a completely new, linguistic approach to Tolkien''s Silmarillion nomenclature. Also from this author: Tolkien Through Russian Eyes (Walking Tree Publishers, 2003), published simultaneously in Russian. "Frodo''s Batman," Tolkien Studies, No. 1 (2004) A Tolkienian Mathomium (Llyfrawr, 2006) The Hobbitonian Anthology (Llyfrawr, 2009) "Reading John Buchan in Search of Tolkien," Tolkien and the Study of His Sources, Jason Fisher (ed.). (McFarland, 2011) Tolkien and Welsh (Llyfrawr, 2012) The Tolkienaeum (Llyfrawr, 2014) Iter Tolkienensis (Llyfrawr, 2016)

The War of the Jewels

An analysis of Tolkien's story of Middle Earth looks at the wars of Elves and Men against Morgoth, the "Grey Annals," and Beleriand geography

Author: John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780395710418

Category: Fiction

Page: 470

View: 730

An analysis of Tolkien's story of Middle Earth looks at the wars of Elves and Men against Morgoth, the "Grey Annals," and Beleriand geography