The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

An eyewitness account of the conquest of Mexico (1519-1522); this volume focuses on the Aztec emperor Montezuma.

Author: Bernal Díaz del Castillo

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108017061

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 767

Bernal Díaz del Castillo (1492-1584) was a foot soldier in the army of Mexico's conqueror Hernán Cortés, and participated in the campaigns that led to the fall of the Aztec empire in 1521. This 1928 translation of his journals derives from the 1904 edition by the Mexican historian Genaro García - the first edition based on the original manuscript. Written as a corrective to accounts that overemphasised Cortés' exploits, Díaz's epic focuses on the experiences of the common soldier. The most complete contemporary chronicle of the Mexican conquest, this important historical document is also a captivating adventure narrative that combines factual accuracy with many dramatic anecdotes. This volume focuses on the complex relationships that developed between the Spaniards and the Aztec emperor Montezuma on the army's arrival in Mexico. It contains chapters 82-136 and a key to the maps that appear at http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781108017060.

The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

This is a new print-on-demand hardback edition of the volume first published in 1910.

Author: Alfred Percival Maudslay

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409413912

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 247

Books V-IX (1519-20) translated into English and edited, with introduction and notes, by Alfred Percival Maudslay, M.A., Hon. Professor of Archaeology, National Museum, Mexico, concerning the march to Mexico, the stay there, the expedition against Narvaez, the flight from Mexico, and the halt at Tepeaca. Together with the text descriptive of the maps and plans of the valley and city of Mexico, originally published separately in vol. 25 Follows on from Second Series 23, and continued in 30, and 40. This is a new print-on-demand hardback edition of the volume first published in 1910.

The True History of The Conquest of New Spain

The concise contextual introduction to this volume traces the origins, history, and methods of the Spanish enterprise in the Americas; it also discusses the nature of the conflict between the Spanish and the Aztecs in Mexico, and compares ...

Author: Bernal Diaz del Castillo

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1603848177

Category: History

Page: 498

View: 155

This rugged new translation--the first entirely new English translation in half a century and the only one based on the most recent critical edition of the Guatemalan MS--allows Diaz to recount, in his own battle-weary and often cynical voice, the achievements, stratagems, and frequent cruelty of Hernando Cortes and his men as they set out to overthrow Moctezuma's Aztec kingdom and establish a Spanish empire in the New World. The concise contextual introduction to this volume traces the origins, history, and methods of the Spanish enterprise in the Americas; it also discusses the nature of the conflict between the Spanish and the Aztecs in Mexico, and compares Diaz's version of events to those of other contemporary chroniclers. Editorial glosses summarize omitted portions, and substantial footnotes explain those terms, names, and cultural references in Diaz's text that may be unfamiliar to modern readers. A chronology of the Conquest is included, as are a guide to major figures, a select bibliography, and three maps.


The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Author: Bernal Diaz Del Castillo

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN: 9780353412187

Category: History

Page: 518

View: 644

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


The True History of the Conquest of New Spain From the Only Exact Copy Made of the Original Manuscript

Description: This supplementary volume deals only with the maps and plans of the valley and city of Mexico, beginning with a Pre-Columbian plan and ending with a map of the valley compiled from the latest surveys at the time of its ...

Author: Bernal Díaz Del Castillo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 229

Description: This supplementary volume deals only with the maps and plans of the valley and city of Mexico, beginning with a Pre-Columbian plan and ending with a map of the valley compiled from the latest surveys at the time of its publication.

The Essential Diaz

Included in this edition is a new preface outlining the social, economic, and political forces that motivated the European "discovery" of the New World.

Author: Bernal Diaz del Castillo

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1624661882

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 735

Ideally suited for use in swift-moving surveys of World, Atlantic, and Latin American history, this abridgment of Ted Humphrey and Janet Burke's 2012 translation of the True History provides key excerpts from Diaz's text and concise summaries of omitted passages. Included in this edition is a new preface outlining the social, economic, and political forces that motivated the European "discovery" of the New World.

The Conquest of New Spain

Late in life, when Díaz del Castillo was eighty-four years old, and residing in his encomienda estates in Guatemala, he wrote The True History of the Conquest of New Spain to defend the story of the common-soldier conquistador within the ...

Author: Bernal Diaz Del Castillo

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781499546309

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 709

The Conquest of New Spain is the first-person narrative of Bernal D�az del Castillo (1492-1581), the 16th-century military adventurer, conquistador, and colonist settler, who served in three Mexican expeditions; those of Francisco Hern�ndez de C�rdoba (1517) to the Yucat�n peninsula; the expedition of Juan de Grijalva (1518), and the expedition of Hern�n Cort�s (1517) in the Valley of Mexico; the history relates his participation in the fall of Emperor Moctezuma II, and the subsequent defeat of the Aztec empire. In the colonial history of Latin America, The Conquest of New Spain is a vivid, military account that establishes Bernal D�az del Castillo "among chroniclers what Daniel Defoe is among novelists". Late in life, when D�az del Castillo was eighty-four years old, and residing in his encomienda estates in Guatemala, he wrote The True History of the Conquest of New Spain to defend the story of the common-soldier conquistador within the histories about the Spanish conquest of Mexico. He presents his narrative as an alternative to the critical writings of Fr. Bartolom� de Las Casas, whose Indian-native histories emphasized the cruelty of the conquest; and the histories of the hagiographic biographers of Hern�n Cort�s - specifically that of Francisco L�pez de G�mara, whom he believed minimized the role of the 700 enlisted soldiers who were instrumental to conquering the Aztec empire. That said historians and hagiographers speak the truth "neither in the beginning, nor the middle, nor the end", is why D�az del Castillo strongly defended the actions of the conquistadors, whilst emphasising their humanity and honesty in his eyewitness narrative, which he summarised as: "We went there to serve God, and also to get rich". The history is occasionally uncharitable about Captain Cort�s, because, like other professional soldiers who participated in the Conquest of New Spain, D�az del Castillo found himself among the ruins of Tenochtitl�n only slightly wealthier than when he arrived to Mexico; a financial state common to many soldiers, who accused Cort�s of taking more loot than his agreed fifth of the Aztec treasury. Certainly, the land and gold compensation paid to many of the conquistadores proved a poor return for their investment of months of soldiering and fighting across Mexico and the Anahuac Valley. Another interpretation of The Conquest of New Spain proposes that the author was one of several family relatives of Diego Vel�zquez de Cu�llar, the governor of Cuba, and mortal enemy of Cort�s; many of whom later plotted against the conquistador Captain. Although the narrative thrust diminishes the Cort�s-D�az del Castillo relationship, contrary to the factual record, his complex relationship with Cort�s, and the sub-ordinate captains, suggests that, although he represented the faction of Governor Vel�zquez de Cu�llar in the expedition, Bernal D�az del Castillo fully honoured his personal and military loyalty to Hern�n Cort�s.






The History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz del Castillo

The Return of Ouetzalcoatl David Carrasco 8 One of the most puzzling
statements, often repeated in Diaz del Castillo's True History, is that the
indigenous people, in the words of Cortes, "take us for gods or beings like their
idols" (66).

Author: Davíd Carrasco

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826342884

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 401

The History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz del Castillo, a new abridgement of Diaz del Castillo's classic Historia verdadera de la conquista de Nueva España, offers a unique contribution to our understanding of the political and religious forces that drove the great cultural encounter between Spain and the Americas known as the "conquest of Mexico." Besides containing important passages, scenes, and events excluded from other abridgements, this edition includes eight useful interpretive essays that address indigenous religions and cultural practices, sexuality during the early colonial period, the roles of women in indigenous cultures, and analysis of the political and economic purposes behind Diaz del Castillo's narrative. A series of maps illuminate the routes of the conquistadors, the organization of indigenous settlements, the struggle for the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, as well as the disastrous Spanish journey to Honduras. The information compiled for this volume offers increased accessibility to the original text, places it in a wider social and narrative context, and encourages further learning, research, and understanding.

Exam Prep for The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

This book provides over 2,000 Exam Prep questions and answers to accompany the text The True History of the Conquest of New Spain Items include highly probable exam items: Neanderthal, Mohenjo-daro, Ancient DNA, Garden of Eden, and more.

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The True History of the Conquest of New Spain By Bernal Diaz del Castillo One of its Conquerors

The edition includes a bibliography of Mexico, pp. 311-68. Continued in Second Series 24, 25, 30, and 40. This is a new print-on-demand hardback edition of the volume first published in 1908.

Author: Alfred Percival Maudslay

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317012968

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 813

Books I-IV (1517-19), translated into English and edited, with introduction and notes, by Alfred Percival Maudslay, M.A., Hon. Professor of Archaeology, National Museum, Mexico, concerning the discovery of Mexico and the expeditions of Francisco Hernández de Cordova and Hernan Cortés, the march inland, and the war in Tlaxcala. The edition includes a bibliography of Mexico, pp. 311-68. Continued in Second Series 24, 25, 30, and 40. This is a new print-on-demand hardback edition of the volume first published in 1908.

Early Modern Spain

Bernal Díaz del Castillo , The Conquest of Mexico ( 1550s ) Translated from
Spanish by Alfred Percival Maudslay ... SOURCE : The True History of the
Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Díaz del Castillo , One of Its Conquerors , ed .
and trans .

Author: Jon Cowans

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812218459

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 705

"It is difficult to think of a better way of introducing students to the rich diversity of Hispanic civilization in the Golden Age and Enlightenment than through the pages of this book."—History

Mexico and the Spanish Conquest

The Conquistadors: FirstPerson Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press. Díaz del Castillo, Bernal. 1908–16. The True
History of the Conquest of New Spain. Translatedby AlfredPercival Maudslay.
5vols.

Author: Ross Hassig

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806148195

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 113

What role did indigenous peoples play in the Spanish conquest of Mexico? Ross Hassig explores this question in Mexico and the Spanish Conquest by incorporating primary accounts from the Indians of Mexico and revisiting the events of the conquest against the backdrop of the Aztec empire, the culture and politics of Mesoamerica, and the military dynamics of both sides. He analyzes the weapons, tactics, and strategies employed by both the Indians and the Spaniards, and concludes that the conquest was less a Spanish victory than it was a victory of Indians over other Indians, which the Spaniards were able to exploit to their own advantage. In this second edition of his classic work, Hassig incorporates new research in the same concise manner that made the original edition so popular and provides further explanations of the actions and motivations of Cortés, Moteuczoma, and other key figures. He also explores their impact on larger events and examines in greater detail Spanish military tactics and strategies.

The Spanish Conquest of Mexico Revised Edition

Díaz believed that Cortés's letters and other published accounts of the conquest
did not tell the real story of what happened in Mexico. ... His own book, The True
History of the Conquest of New Spain, was meant to set the record straight.

Author: Sylvia A. Johnson

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 1467703826

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 154

View: 160

Can the conquest of one city change the world? In 1519, two powerful empires - Spain and Mexica (Aztec) - were hungry for expansion in central Mexico. Led by emperor Motecuzoma II, the Mexica people had subdued their native enemies and now controlled a sprawling territory with the great city of Tenochtitlán at the center. Then the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés led an attack on the Mexica empire. Although the Spaniards had horses and guns, both unknown in the Americas, the Mexica outnumbered them five hundred to one. The Spaniards had no chance of success without the help of native allies unhappy with Mexica rule. What followed was a desperate war that lasted two years, cost thousands of lives, and left Tenochtitlán in ruins. In 1521 Cortés declared Mexico a colony of New Spain. In so doing, he laid the groundwork for the expansion of European power throughout the Americas and changed the world forever. The Spanish conquest of Mexico is one of world history's pivotal moments.