The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang

Republican-Era Martial Arts Fiction John Christopher Hamm. The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang John Christopher Hamm The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang Republican-Era Martial.

Author: John Christopher Hamm

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231549008

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 299

View: 332

Xiang Kairan, who wrote under the pen name “the Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang,” is remembered as the father of modern Chinese martial arts fiction, one of the most distinctive forms of twentieth-century Chinese culture and the inspiration for China’s globally popular martial arts cinema. In this book, John Christopher Hamm shows how Xiang Kairan’s work and career offer a new lens on the transformations of fiction and popular culture in early-twentieth-century China. The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang situates Xiang Kairan’s career in the larger contexts of Republican-era China’s publishing industry, literary debates, and political and social history. At a time when writers associated with the New Culture movement promoted an aggressively modernizing vision of literature, Xiang Kairan consciously cultivated his debt to homegrown narrative traditions. Through careful readings of Xiang Kairan’s work, Hamm demonstrates that his writings, far from being the formally fossilized and ideologically regressive relics their critics denounced, represent a creative engagement with contemporary social and political currents and the demands and possibilities of an emerging cultural marketplace. Hamm takes martial arts fiction beyond the confines of genre studies to situate it within a broader reexamination of Chinese literary modernity. The first monograph on Xiang Kairan’s fiction in any language, The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang rewrites the history of early-twentieth-century Chinese literature from the standpoints of genre fiction and commercial publishing.

The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang

The writer's life -- Xiang Kairan's monkeys : xiaoshuo as a literary genre -- Thematic subgenre : martial arts fiction -- Form and medium : the serialized linked-chapter novel and beyond -- Marvelous gallants of the rivers and lakes -- ...

Author: John Christopher Hamm

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780231190565

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 281

Xiang Kairan, who wrote under the pen name "The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang," is remembered as the father of modern Chinese martial arts fiction. In this book, John Christopher Hamm shows how Xiang Kairan's work and career offer a new lens on the transformations of fiction and popular culture in early twentieth-century China.

The Global White Snake

27, 1924): 1–2; for a recent study on the author of Jianghu qixiazhuan, see Hamm, The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang. 50. The Thunder Peak Pagoda was eventually rebuilt anyway, albeit only in 2002. 51. This is a rather Westernized, ...

Author: Liang Luo

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472038605

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 403

View: 809

Tracing the history and adaptation of one of China's foundational texts

Chinese Film Classics 1922 1949

John Christopher Hamm, The Unworthy Scholar from Pingjiang: Republican-Era Martial Arts Fiction (New York: Columbia University Press, 2019), 133. Bao Weihong, drawing on the same source, cites yearby-year production statistics for ...

Author: Christopher G. Rea

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231547676

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 473

Chinese Film Classics, 1922–1949 is an essential guide to the first golden age of Chinese cinema. Offering detailed introductions to fourteen films, this study highlights the creative achievements of Chinese filmmakers in the decades leading up to 1949, when the Communists won the civil war and began nationalizing cultural industries. Christopher Rea reveals the uniqueness and complexity of Republican China’s cinematic masterworks, from the comedies and melodramas of the silent era to the talkies and musicals of the 1930s and 1940s. Each chapter appraises the artistry of a single film, highlighting its outstanding formal elements, from cinematography to editing to sound design. Examples include the slapstick gags of Laborer’s Love (1922), Ruan Lingyu’s star turn in Goddess (1934), Zhou Xuan’s mesmerizing performance in Street Angels (1937), Eileen Chang’s urbane comedy of manners Long Live the Missus! (1947), the wartime epic Spring River Flows East (1947), and Fei Mu’s acclaimed work of cinematic lyricism, Spring in a Small Town (1948). Rea shares new insights and archival discoveries about famous films, while explaining their significance in relation to politics, society, and global cinema. Lavishly illustrated and featuring extensive guides to further viewings and readings, Chinese Film Classics, 1922–1949 offers an accessible tour of China’s early contributions to the cinematic arts.