The Wasp Factory

The polarizing literary debut by Scottish author Ian Banks, The Wasp Factory is the bizarre, imaginative, disturbing, and darkly comic look into the mind of a child psychopath.

Author: Iain Banks

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476750246

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 489

The polarizing literary debut by Scottish author Ian Banks, The Wasp Factory is the bizarre, imaginative, disturbing, and darkly comic look into the mind of a child psychopath. Meet Frank Cauldhame. Just sixteen, and unconventional to say the least: Two years after I killed Blyth I murdered my young brother Paul, for quite different and more fundamental reasons than I'd disposed of Blyth, and then a year after that I did for my young cousin Esmerelda, more or less on a whim. That's my score to date. Three. I haven't killed anybody for years, and don't intend to ever again. It was just a stage I was going through.

Iain Banks The Wasp Factory The Crow Road and Whit

Alan MacGillivray's Scotnote provides an overview of Iain Banks's fiction, and focuses on three novels in particular: The Wasp Factory, a darkly comic piece of Scottish Gothic fiction; The Crow Road, a cross-generational family saga with ...

Author: Alan MacGillivray

Publisher: Scotnotes Study Guides

ISBN: 9780948877483

Category:

Page: 80

View: 613

The SCOTNOTES booklets are a series of study guides to major Scottish writers and texts frequently used within literature courses, aimed at senior secondary school pupils and students in further education. This title covers three novels by Iain Banks.

Masculinity Men and Monsters in FRANKENSTEIN and the WASP FACTORY an Commentary

This is partly because the two novels feature overlapping themes such as the moulding and shaping of bodies, and men meddling with nature.

Author: Omega Literature Omega Literature and Commentary Series

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781720275565

Category:

Page: 298

View: 229

Masculinity as a topic and gothic as a genre are two concepts which have been closely intertwined for centuries. This might be because, as Chris Baldick points out, "the imprisoning house of Gothic fiction has from the very beginning been that of patriarchy, in both its earlier and its expanded feminist senses". In the context of the gothic genre, the patriarchy is both the oppressive structures which aim to limit the freedom of the main characters as well as the comforting status quo against which the transgressive monster is rebelling. Masculinities are however not necessarily indefinitely tied to the patriarchy as they can also be in rebellion against the status quo which supposedly gives masculinity its power. Masculinity in fiction is therefore interesting because it can encapsulate different masculinities. Whether men are as Synnott (2009) summarizes them in the title of his book "Heroes", "Villains" or "Victims" they are an integral part of gothic storytelling.In this thesis I will be exploring masculinity and gothic monsters in Mary Shelley''s Frankenstein (1818a) and Iain Banks'' The Wasp Factory (1984). I will do this through an analysis of how the novels understand masculinity and men, as well as how masculinity and patriarchy is subverted and upheld through the novels'' gothic monsters and their interactions with society. There are also other similar themes that are handled in the two novels such as men''s search to control over nature and the patriarchy''s aim at limiting femininity''s influence. For my analysis, I will be drawing on sources from different feminist and masculinist literary critics as well as social theorists. For the gothic genre aspects of the analysis several texts written about the genre and how it pertains to masculinity and gender will be my foundation. Literary criticism of gothic has a long history of analysis in relation to gender, especially popular in the 1990s, but not as much when it comes to the particular aspects of masculinity.It is, however, hard to find an academic article about Iain Banks'' The Wasp Factory (1984) which does not include a comparison between that novel and Mary Shelley''s Frankenstein (1818a). This is partly because the two novels feature overlapping themes such as the moulding and shaping of bodies, and men meddling with nature. Shelley''s novel also seems to be a model for Banks'' novel with the underlying themes of men''s hubris in thinking that they are in control of nature and father''s constructing and changing their children. Angus Cauldhame and his quest to eradicate all female influence around him through changing the sex and gender of his child, has often been classified as ''Frankensteinian'' in its scope (de Coning 2012, Pisarska 2014, Schoene-Harwood 1999). The focus on Frank''s body and his incapability to fit in with society''s norms can be drawn as a parallel to Victor Frankenstein''s Monster. Critics'' comparisons between the novels, however, often stop with this superficial comparison of the novels. For despite the frequent pairing of the novels by academics, no thorough analysis has, to my knowledge, been made on them together - until now.Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, might be one of the most known and recognizable stories in the English-speaking world. Far lesser known than Frankenstein is Iain Banks'' The Wasp Factory. There is an underlying fascination with what makes society work in Iain Banks'' oeuvre, from his science- fiction novels written under the name Iain M. Banks, to his more conventional books. Few places are these sentiments as clearly expressed as in his debut novel The Wasp Factory (1984). Despite its frequent comparisons to Shelley''s Frankenstein (1818a) due to its themes of ''monstrosity'' created by a ''scientist'' through tampering with nature (Pisarska 2014, Schoene-Harwood 1999), The Wasp Factory is more than a direct retelling of Shelley''s story. The novel does interesting things on its own concerning gender and masculinity.

Bildungsromans

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source: Wikipedia

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN: 9781233164837

Category:

Page: 80

View: 670

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 79. Chapters: A Wizard of Earthsea, Bildungsroman, The Wasp Factory, Northanger Abbey, Great Expectations, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Tipping the Velvet, The Land of Green Plums, Mary: A Fiction, Wilhelm Meister's Journeyman Years, Nightmare Abbey, The Magic Mountain, The Red and the Black, Villette, The Sorrows of Young Werther, The Chrysalids, Of Human Bondage, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Sentimental Education, Go Tell It on the Mountain, Siddhartha, Lanark: A Life in Four Books, Der Nachsommer, The Sword in the Stone, The Power of One, Cat and Mouse, Narcissus and Goldmund, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, The Getting of Wisdom, Spies, Peter Camenzind, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, Le Grand Meaulnes, Sacred Country, The Liar, Lyddie, The Garden Party, Metroland, Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, The Lamplighter, City of God, The Rise and Fall of Darth Vader, Stephen Hero, A Song of Sixpence, Green Henry. Excerpt: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is the 1969 autobiography about the early years of African-American writer and poet Maya Angelou. The first in a six-volume series, it is a coming-of-age story that illustrates how strength of character and a love of literature can help overcome racism and trauma. The book begins when three-year-old Maya and her older brother are sent to Stamps, Arkansas, to live with their grandmother and ends when Maya becomes a mother at the age of 17. In the course of Caged Bird, Maya transforms from a victim of racism with an inferiority complex into a self-possessed, dignified young woman capable of responding to prejudice. Angelou was challenged by her friend, author James Baldwin, and her editor, Robert Loomis, to write an autobiography that was also a piece of literature. Because Angelou uses thematic development and other techniques common to fiction, reviewers often categ...

Beyond Extremes

Folkert Degenring Identität und Identitätskonstruktionen in Iain Banks ' The Wasp
Factory Die enge Verknüpfung von Narration , Fiktion und Identität ist ein
Themenkomplex , der in der postmodernen englischsprachigen Literatur ( und
deren ...

Author: Stefan Glomb

Publisher: Gunter Narr Verlag

ISBN: 9783823360971

Category: Civilization, Modern, in literature

Page: 398

View: 190



Gothic Dimensions

This book by Moira Martingale is the first full-length comprehensive analysis of Banks's oeuvre and the thematic - and very Gothic - interests which preoccupied him.

Author: Moira Martingale

Publisher: Quetzalcoatl Publishing

ISBN: 1843962020

Category: Science

Page: 394

View: 784

IAIN BANKS was one of the finest writers of his generation. The Wasp Factory appeared in 1984, to great and gratifying controversy (one reviewer helpfully described it as "e;a work of unparalleled depravity"e;). There were a further 27 works of fiction from the prolific Banks before his untimely death in June 2013 at the age of 59, his customary method being to alternate between contemporary fiction and science fiction - the latter genre published under the name of Iain M. Banks. In 2008 The Times named Banks in their list of the 50 greatest British writers since 1945. This book by Moira Martingale is the first full-length comprehensive analysis of Banks's oeuvre and the thematic - and very Gothic - interests which preoccupied him. These interests include human monstrosity, religious belief, the fluidity of identity, the evolution of humankind and the technological adaptations which may order our future. At the outer limits of time and space can be found Banks's Utopian space civilization, The Culture. With its emphasis on the distant and unearthly - and the opening of the mind to imaginative possibilities - science fiction shares common ground with Gothic fiction of former centuries, and the Gothic is inherent to all Banks's fiction, dealing as it does with the ambiguities which wriggle uncomfortably and uncannily around the boundaries between good and evil, life and death, victim and villain, past and present, civilization and primitive barbarity, organic and machine or artificial technology. In most of Banks's work, conventions of the Gothic boil or simmer, whether it be the barbarities of the past entering the present, the ambivalent literary device of the Doppelganger or the blurred boundaries between the life of the dreaming unconscious and "e;real"e; life. Banks incorporates the fantastic, the mythological and the psychological to re-sculpt the Gothic's early fictional motifs and ethical concerns for our own time, and then he projects them star-wards, enabling him to elaborate a futuristic myth of socio-political salvation through technological expertise. With reference to many other writers, including J. G. Ballard, Stephen King, Doris Lessing, Mary Shelley and Banks's fellow-Scot Alasdair Gray, this book, rather in the style of the Gothic itself, straddles the boundary dividing the scholastic from popular writing. The style is clear and accessible and should appeal to both the academic and the general intelligent reader of Banks's work. MOIRA MARTINGALE is a journalist, author and former columnist for national and regional newspapers. Her previous books were published in the UK by Robert Hale and internationally by various publishers. She has a doctorate in Gothic Literature.



Iain M Banks

The thirteen SF novels that followed inspired an avid fandom and intense intellectual engagement while Banks's mainstream books vaulted him to the top of the Scottish literary scene.

Author: Paul Kincaid

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252099567

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 802

The 1987 publication of Iain M. Banks's Consider Phlebas helped trigger the British renaissance of radical hard science fiction and influenced a generation of New Space Opera masters. The thirteen SF novels that followed inspired an avid fandom and intense intellectual engagement while Banks's mainstream books vaulted him to the top of the Scottish literary scene. Paul Kincaid has written the first study of Iain M. Banks to explore the confluence of his SF and literary techniques and sensibilities. As Kincaid shows, the two powerful aspects of Banks's work flowed into each other, blurring a line that critics too often treat as clear-cut. Banks's gift for black humor and a honed skepticism regarding politics and religion found expression even as he orchestrated the vast, galaxy-spanning vistas in his novels of the Culture. In examining Banks's entire SF oeuvre, Kincaid unlocks the set of ideas Banks drew upon, ideas that spoke to an unusually varied readership that praised him as a visionary and reveled in the distinctive character of his works. Entertaining and broad in scope, Iain M. Banks offers new insights on one of the most admired figures in contemporary science fiction.

Classic Glamour Photography

The stunning update of this successful title brings it into the 21st century with talented new photographers, using both digital and film to create the latest look in glamour photography.

Author: Duncan Evans

Publisher: Amphoto

ISBN: 9780817436735

Category: Photography

Page: 160

View: 880

The stunning update of this successful title brings it into the 21st century with talented new photographers, using both digital and film to create the latest look in glamour photography. The practical section brings you up to date with the photographic equipment available today, including a new section on digital technology and its pros and cons. Find out how the professionals achieve their results with examples of their work and details on locations, models, and equipment used. Get clear, practical advice on choosing the right equipment and working with models. Learn all about lighting, shooting in a studio or on location, composition, post production, and the latest digital techniques. Book jacket.

Look To Windward

Praise for the Culture series: 'Epic in scope, ambitious in its ideas and absorbing in its execution' Independent on Sunday 'Banks has created one of the most enduring and endearing visions of the future' Guardian 'Jam-packed with ...

Author: Iain M. Banks

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0748110038

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 331

The seventh Culture book from the awesome imagination of Iain M. Banks, a modern master of science fiction. It was one of the less glorious incidents of a long-ago war. It led to the destruction of two suns and the billions of lives they supported. Now, eight hundred years later, the light from the first of those ancient mistakes has reached the Culture Orbital, Masaq'. The light from the second may not. Praise for the Culture series: 'Epic in scope, ambitious in its ideas and absorbing in its execution' Independent on Sunday 'Banks has created one of the most enduring and endearing visions of the future' Guardian 'Jam-packed with extraordinary invention' Scotsman 'Compulsive reading' Sunday Telegraph The Culture series: Consider Phlebas The Player of Games Use of Weapons The State of the Art Excession Inversions Look to Windward Matter Surface Detail The Hydrogen Sonata Other books by Iain M. Banks: Against a Dark Background Feersum Endjinn The Algebraist

The Culture Series of Iain M Banks

This work aims at understanding the Culture series not only as a fundamental contribution to science fiction but also as a product of its creator's responses to the turbulent times he lived in.

Author: Simone Caroti

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476620407

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 252

View: 356

This critical history of Iain M. Banks’ Culture novels covers the series from its inception in the 1970s to the The Hydrogen Sonata (2012), published less than a year before Banks’ death. It considers Banks’ origins as a writer, the development of his politics and ethics, his struggles to become a published author, his eventual success with The Wasp Factory (1984) and the publication of the first Culture novel, Consider Phlebas (1987). His 1994 essay “A Few Notes on the Culture” is included, along with a range of critical responses to the 10 Culture books he published in his lifetime and a discussion of the series’ status as utopian literature. Banks was a complex man, both in his everyday life and on the page. This work aims at understanding the Culture series not only as a fundamental contribution to science fiction but also as a product of its creator’s responses to the turbulent times he lived in.

Transition

On the Concern's books are Temudjin Oh, an un-killable assassin who journeys between the peaks of Nepal, a version of Victorian London and the dark palaces of Venice; and a nameless, faceless torturer known only as the Philosopher.

Author: Iain Banks

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0748112170

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 963

A world that hangs suspended between triumph and catastrophe, between the dismantling of the Wall and the fall of the Twin Towers, frozen in the shadow of suicide terrorism and global financial collapse, such a world requires a firm hand and a guiding light. But does it need the Concern: an all-powerful organisation with a malevolent presiding genius, pervasive influence and numberless invisible operatives in possession of extraordinary powers? On the Concern's books are Temudjin Oh, an un-killable assassin who journeys between the peaks of Nepal, a version of Victorian London and the dark palaces of Venice; and a nameless, faceless torturer known only as the Philosopher. And then there's the renegade Mrs Mulverhill, who recruits rebels to her side; and Patient 8262, hiding out from a dirty past in a forgotten hospital ward. As these vivid, strange and sensuous worlds circle and collide, the implications of turning traitor to the Concern become horribly apparent, and an unstable universe is set on a dizzying course.

Against A Dark Background

Praise for Iain M. Banks: 'Epic in scope, ambitious in its ideas and absorbing in its execution' Independent on Sunday 'Banks has created one of the most enduring and endearing visions of the future' Guardian 'Jam-packed with extraordinary ...

Author: Iain M. Banks

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0748109986

Category: Fiction

Page: 512

View: 728

A superb standalone novel from the awesome imagination of Iain M. Banks, a master of modern science fiction. Sharrow was once the leader of a personality-attuned combat team in one of the sporadic little commercial wars in the civilisation based around the planet Golter. Now she is hunted by the Huhsz, a religious cult which believes that she is the last obstacle before the faith's apotheosis, and her only hope of escape is to find the last of the apocalyptically powerful Lazy Guns before the Huhsz find her. Her journey through the exotic Golterian system is a destructive and savage odyssey into her past, and that of her family and of the system itself. Praise for Iain M. Banks: 'Epic in scope, ambitious in its ideas and absorbing in its execution' Independent on Sunday 'Banks has created one of the most enduring and endearing visions of the future' Guardian 'Jam-packed with extraordinary invention' Scotsman 'Compulsive reading' Sunday Telegraph The Culture series: Consider Phlebas The Player of Games Use of Weapons The State of the Art Excession Inversions Look to Windward Matter Surface Detail The Hydrogen Sonata Other books by Iain M. Banks: Against a Dark Background Feersum Endjinn The Algebraist

Zed

This vivid, claustrophobic novel is about madness, survival, and crumbling institutions, in the spirit of J.G. Ballard’s High Rise or Iain Banks’ The Wasp Factory.

Author: Elizabeth McClung

Publisher: arsenal pulp press

ISBN: 1551522985

Category: Cooking

Page: 288

View: 116

Zed is having a bad day. She’s 12 and there’s someone around who’s killing kids, which she doesn’t have time for. Already today, she’s knifed a rapist, traded with half the drunks and addicts in town, talked to the dead, bargained with a sociopath, and extracted crucial information from a mental patient, and she hasn’t even left the building. Welcome to The Tower, an urban development project no city wants to lay claim to; a place to steer clear of if at all possible, but if you can’t, you’ll fit right in. This vivid, claustrophobic novel is about madness, survival, and crumbling institutions, in the spirit of J.G. Ballard’s High Rise or Iain Banks’ The Wasp Factory.

Categorization And Its Discontents

Swiss Diploma Thesis from the year 1997 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Zurich (Englisches Seminar), language: English, abstract: Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt den Versuch dar, ...

Author: Jacqueline Schnurrenberger

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 365617041X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 97

View: 488

Swiss Diploma Thesis from the year 1997 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Zurich (Englisches Seminar), language: English, abstract: Die vorliegende Arbeit stellt den Versuch dar, den Roman "The Wasp Factory" von Iain Banks als kritische postmoderne Relektüre von Sigmund Freuds Schriften zur Sexualität zu erforschen. Postmoderne Ästhetik erweist sich als besonders brauchbar für solch eine Freud-Kritik, da hier die Frage der nicht lösbaren Widersprüche in den Vordergrund tritt, gleichzeitig aber auch eine parodistische Neugestaltung tradierter Topoi- wie etwa das des Künstlermannes, die Rivalität zu der als weiblich begriffenen Natur arbeitet - erprobt wird. In diesen Kontext wird der Roman von Banks gesetzt, den die Verfasserin sowohl als klugen Freud-Leser wie auch als Kritiker verstanden haben will.

Complicity

In Scotland, a self-appointed executioner dispenses justice to fit the crime. Thus the lenient judge who let a rapist go is punished by being raped, while a man who killed is killed in turn.

Author: Iain Banks

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743200187

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 161

In Scotland, a self-appointed executioner dispenses justice to fit the crime. Thus the lenient judge who let a rapist go is punished by being raped, while a man who killed is killed in turn.

Ethically Speaking

As we will see, both writers depict various forms of retreat from the other, but also
highlight the limits and consequences of that retreat. Iain Banks The Wasp
Factory seeks to displace the paternal metaphor, but merely translates it another
form.

Author: James McGonigal

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9042020849

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 370

As politics and cultures interact within an increasingly diverse Scotland, and differences in values become more evident across generations, the need for clear understanding and cooperation within and between communities becomes a pressing issue. This relates both to local and larger concerns: language, violence, morality, gender and sexuality, education, ethnicity, truth and lies. The chapters gathered here focus on significant Scottish writers of the late twentieth and early twenty first centuries, (Edwin Morgan, A.L. Kennedy, Liz Lochhead, John Burnside, Jackie Kay, Robin Jenkins, Muriel Spark, William McIlvanney, Ali Smith, James Kelman and others) and the communities described are certainly Scottish, but the issues raised are universal. Questions are asked about the relationship of the individual to others, and therefore, on a larger scale, about the means through which any community is both constructed and sustained: linguistically, spiritually, ethically. If their multiple voices evoke a “zigzag of contradictions”, it is at any rate a creative zigzag which discovers, or uncovers, many contradictory aspects of life in modern Scotland that should particularly be brought to light in a re-emergent nation. Ethically speaking, Scottish writers point out the need to attend to many different narratives and retellings, in order that Scots might live more honestly and clear-sightedly with themselves and with the wider world.

White Male Heart

An extraordinarily powerful and critically acclaimed debut - Val McDermid called it 'brutal and beautiful' - to compare to such classics as Lord of the Flies by William Golding and Iain Banks' The Wasp Factory.

Author: Ruaridh Nicoll

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 144649733X

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 616

An extraordinarily powerful and critically acclaimed debut - Val McDermid called it 'brutal and beautiful' - to compare to such classics as Lord of the Flies by William Golding and Iain Banks' The Wasp Factory. In the magnificent wilderness that is the Scottish Highlands, Aaron and Hugh have been friends for as long as they can remember, bound by a shared affinity for their surroundings and an increasing sense of alienation from the remote, close-knit community that is their home. But when a young woman - fleeing life in the city and a broken love affair - moves to the area, the ties that bind the boys are slowly, irrevocably stretched to near-breaking point. And as the strain on Aaron and Hugh's friendship builds, so the violence that is endemic in the land begins to infect them both. Driven to the very edge of reason, they turn on their world to vent their frustration and anger and hurt in the only way they know, embarking on a spree of quite horrific destruction...