Woodland Cemetery

A great deal of the inspiration for my own involvement with the cemetery began with Michel Shaia, a human encyclopedia of Woodland Cemetery history, ...

Author: Michelle A. Day

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738598828

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 800

Woodland Cemetery, the second-oldest cemetery in Cleveland, was named after a romantic description of an unseen Cleveland that was part of a popular 1803 pastoral poem, The Pleasures of Hope, by Scottish poet Thomas Campbell. Its 60 acres provide a primer on American cemetery design, from the "rural cemetery" intricacies of the 1850s to the more rambling style of the late 19th century to the rectangular 20th-century grid. Its mausoleums are designed in Classical, Victorian, Egyptian, and Richardson rustic styles. These varied structures--along with angels, obelisks, and military memorials--are symbolic of the residents resting within the gates.

To Continue

Although it comes at the end of the text, it is conceptually prior to the other two sections, which were developed upon the basis of the close reading of the existing drawings, and the interplay between continuity and change in the project.

Author: Kevin John Fellingham

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 114

View: 372

This thesis examines the Woodland Cemetery in Stockholm, Sweden, designed and executed between 1914 and 1940 by the architects Erik Gunnar Asplund and Sigurd Lewerentz. The study consists of three parts. The first examines the significance of interment, of the return of the body to the realm of nature upon death. The second speculates upon the operation of time in relation to the idea of memory, focussing on the necessity of forgetting in the process of mourning, and in the process of architectural invention. It brings to the fore the impossibility of forgetting that which is most deeply known, and thus suggests a paradoxical relationship between that which is known and that which is new. This paradox informs those things that must be constructed in the mind and in the world in order to continue beyond a point of traumatic change. The final part is a reconstruction through drawing of eight stages in the evolution of the project. It focuses primarily on the large scale planning of the site, but is related to more detailed elements of the design in order to show the continuity of themes throughout the project, bot in its temporal and physical aspects. Although it comes at the end of the text, it is conceptually prior to the other two sections, which were developed upon the basis of the close reading of the existing drawings, and the interplay between continuity and change in the project. The conclusion seeks to bring some of these ideas together in a form that is not closed, which requires continuation.







WOODLAND CEMETERY

Woodland Cemetery, the second-oldest cemetery in Cleveland, was named after a romantic description of an unseen Cleveland that was part of a popular 1803 pastoral poem, The Pleasures of Hope, by Scottish poet Thomas Campbell.

Author: Michelle A. Day

Publisher: Arcadia Library Editions

ISBN: 9781531666774

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 130

View: 608

Woodland Cemetery, the second-oldest cemetery in Cleveland, was named after a romantic description of an unseen Cleveland that was part of a popular 1803 pastoral poem, The Pleasures of Hope, by Scottish poet Thomas Campbell. Its 60 acres provide a primer on American cemetery design, from the "rural cemetery" intricacies of the 1850s to the more rambling style of the late 19th century to the rectangular 20th-century grid. Its mausoleums are designed in Classical, Victorian, Egyptian, and Richardson rustic styles. These varied structures--along with angels, obelisks, and military memorials--are symbolic of the residents resting within the gates.