Unreliable Memoirs

What accounts for Unreliable Memoirs beingthebest memoir inthe world?And bythatImean nobackhand compliment. Thememoir genrehas suffered anovergrown pullulatingdecadence ofbloom in the thirty five years since Clive's workwas published.

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1447275497

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 192

View: 290

Told with Clive James's unassailable sense of humour and self-effacing charm, Unreliable Memoirs is a hilarious and touching introduction to the story of a national treasure. A million-copy bestseller, this classic memoir is a celebration of life in all its unpredictable glory. With an introduction by political satirist and journalist P. J. O'Rourke. I was born in 1939. The other big event of that year was the outbreak of the Second World War, but for the moment that did not affect me. In the first instalment of James's memoirs we follow the young Clive on his journey from boyhood to the cusp of manhood, when his days of wearing short trousers are finally behind him. Battling with school, girls, various relatives and an overwhelming desire to be a superhero, Clive's adventures growing up in the suburbs of post-war Sydney are hair-raising, uproarious and almost too good to be true . . . 'Do not read this book in public. You will risk severe internal injuries from trying to suppress your laughter.' - Sunday Times.

Unreliable Memoirs

Long unavailable in the U.S., "Unreliable Memoirs" is being made available to American readers.

Author: Clive James

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393336085

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 618

Nearly 30 years ago, James wrote a refreshingly candid book that made no claims to be accurate, precise, or entirely truthful, only to entertain. Long unavailable in the U.S., "Unreliable Memoirs" is being made available to American readers.

Political Autobiographies and Memoirs in Antiquity

chapter one CLASSICAL GREECE Vivien J. Gray Introduction Autobiography identifies the author's self and experiences as his ... who has been covering his life in installments, beginning with his early life in Unreliable Memoirs (London, ...

Author: Gabriele Marasco

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004182993

Category: History

Page: 461

View: 836

Through the examination of political autobiographies and memoirs, some preserved in their entirety, others known only from fragments, this book offers a fascinating picture of the way characters who stand out in history saw and represented themselves and their own political actions.

Always Unreliable

Always Unreliable is the collected first three volumes of Clive James's eloquently witty autobiographies, Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England and May Week Was in June.

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330526723

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 615

Always Unreliable is the collected first three volumes of Clive James's eloquently witty autobiographies, Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England and May Week Was in June. In Unreliable Memoirs we meet the young Clive James – dressed in shorts and growing up in post-war Sydney. With Falling Towards England, we find Clive living in a Swiss Cottage B&B, where he practises the Twist, anticipates poetical masterpieces he’s yet to compose, and worries about his wardrobe. Finally, May Week Was In June sees Clive at Cambridge University, where he enthusiastically involves himself in college life (generally female lives) until May Week – not only in June but also a fortnight long – when he gets married. The rest, of course, is history . . .

Inventory of a Life Mislaid An Unreliable Memoir

Brave , painful , dazzling ... riveting ' Spectator INVENTORY OF A A LIFE MISLAID An Unreliable Memoir MARINA WARNER d CIW INVENTORY OF A LIFE MISLAID An Unreliable Memoir Marina Warner. Front Cover.

Author: Marina Warner

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 0008347603

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 106

A luminous memoir of post-war childhood, adventure and loss on the banks of the Nile. ‘Wonderful – a brave, inventive, touching distillation of memory and imagination’ JENNY UGLOW

Once an Australian

124 ; Unreliable Memoirs , p . 29. I owe the suggestion of This Above All to Brian McFarlane . 17 James on Desert Island Discs ; Unreliable Memoirs , p . 23 . 18 Unreliable Memoirs , pp . 11-12 , 25 , 29–30 , 60–5 , 77–81 , 85–9 , 121–3 ...

Author: Ian Britain

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 417

Four Australian expatriate writers and performers are featured in this book - Barry Humphries, Clive James, Germaine Greer and Robert Hughes. It focuses on the reasons for their expatriatism and considers what aspects of their Australian identity they have retained.

The Lowest Depths

Maybe, he thought, he should avoid writing an autobiography altogether. Perhaps it should be more of a memoir, because that made allowances for some degree of inaccuracy. He recalled Clive James' Unreliable Memoirs, certain that his own ...

Author: Ross Fitzgerald

Publisher: Hybrid Publishers

ISBN: 192573675X

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 349

The eighth book in the Grafton Everest series sees the hapless ex-President of the Republic of Australia, Dr Professor Grafton Everest, caught up in a web of international espionage and intrigue that he is hopelessly ill-equipped to handle. Abandoned to his own inadequate devices when his wife Janet departs on a world tour, with his home invaded by his now broke daughter and son-in-law, Grafton accepts an assignment with the United Nations to investigate electoral fraud in Russia. The reason is not only to get out of the house; an old letter from his mother, addressed to someone in the Soviet Union fifty years ago, suggests that Grafton may not be the only child that he always thought he was. Grafton’s mission to Moscow and his search for this mysterious sibling take him far from the Russian capital, deep into the icy wastes of Siberia and even deeper in a tangled conspiracy whose roots extend back to the Cold War and even as far back as the Russian Revolution.

Me n Pete Recalling a Fifties Childhood

Clive James is also out to amuse in Unreliable Memoirs. He does this in the same style as his popular television programs in the 1980s, in which the clipped and sardonic manner of his commentary, often with a juxtaposition of uproarious ...

Author: Gerard Charles Wilson

Publisher: Gerard Charles Wilson Publisher

ISBN: 1876262192

Category:

Page: 242

View: 833

A social history of Australia, not of the famous and heroic, but of the small people, the anonymous people who were the heartbeat of a growing nation What did kids do in the 1950s when there were no smartphones, tablets, and computers? They roamed the neighbourhood on scooters and bikes. They went on bush hikes. They went to Saturday matinees where the theatres were packed to the rafters, and kids yelled at hero-action and booed kissing. Most of their pleasures were self-made. Besides roaming the streets free of risk, kids enjoyed trips to the beach and zoo. They took a double-decker bus town to see the Christmas displays. Christmas in the city was a wonderland of toys and amusements. The decade of the 1950s now seems idyllic to many now in their seventies and eighties. It was so different from the first decades of the 21st century that those years now seem like another world, an impossible world of social and moral values. In today’s atmosphere, it seems hard to imagine it possessed any legitimate social and moral coherence. The author looks back on those years, telling the story as much about the world he grew up in as about himself. He starts from his birth in July 1946 and goes to the end of his second year at primary school, 1953, when he turned six and learnt to read. It was also the year that Princess Elizabeth was crowned Queen of England, a super-nova event for Australia. The author’s story involves his lifelong friend, Pete, a rubella baby, a condition which tragically took his already poor sight in his teenage years. Pete’s story, told as an adult without sight, is fascinating. The year 1946 was the year after the Second World War had ended. Despite an optimistic outlook, Australia was full of talk of the war – of the threat of war, of the suffering, of the shocking cruelty of the Japanese army, and of lost loved ones. The author’s upbeat father, just discharged from the navy with the rank of Chief Petty Officer, put it all behind him and began building the family’s first house in Lane Cove, a suburb on the north side of Sydney Harbour, and the scene of his childhood. Their new three-bedroom, double-brick home was like a palace. For a boy, who according to his mother had ants in his pants, the author remembers much about the social and political events that provoked his father into long and loud comment. He has clear memories of the Korean War, the activities of the communist-controlled unions, Prime Minister Menzies’ measures against them, and so much more. The local convent under the regime of the Mercy Sisters is an unmissable part of his story. He recalls with affection the sisters’ teaching methods and their strict regimentation of their pupils. He thinks some of their disciplinary methods, now condemned by many, are rather amusing to look back on. He regards that class of 1953 as the end of a phase in his development when he learnt to read. The following year, 1954, was rich in social and political events and will start the fourth book in the family history series, COMMUNISTS, BILLYCARTS AND TWO WHEELERS.

Prison Hulk to Redemption

Clive James is also out to amuse in Unreliable Memoirs. He does this in the same style as his popular television programs in the 1980s, in which the clipped and sardonic manner of his commentary, often with a juxtaposition of uproarious ...

Author: Gerard Charles Wilson

Publisher: Gerard Charles Wilson Publisher

ISBN: 1876262389

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 397

A history of colonial Australia, not of the famous and heroic, but of the small people, the anonymous people who were the heartbeat of a growing nation In this first book of the series, A HISTORY OF A CATHOLIC FAMILY, the author sets out on a journey through Australia’s colonial history with his ancestors, who gradually take on flesh and blood from the bone-dry official documents. All his ancestors are from British Isles, all arriving by the 1830s, two on the First Fleet in 1788. Most are from southern England: Wiltshire, Lancashire, Middlesex, Essex, Norfolk, Lincolnshire, and Huntingdonshire. Astonishingly, four are from two little villages close by each other in Wiltshire: Semley and Donhead St Mary. A small Irish contingent of two convicts and one free settler come from Dublin, Monaghan, and Donegal. A farming family of four from Aberdeen Scotland, the Burgesses, literate people with a keen sense of decorum, make up the full count. It is surprising how much he finds out about them all—joys, successes, and tragedies. Their lives are anything but dull. James Joseph Wilson, who narrowly escaped the gallows and was surprisingly literate for a man thrice convicted of burglary, arrived in Port Jackson on board the Prince Regent in 1827. The colonial authorities assigned him to Robert Lowe, one of the Colony’s early landholders. Lowe sent him to Mudgee in north-western New South Wales to shepherd his flocks. Young 18-year-old hutkeeper James Joseph was one of the first inhabitants in the Mudgee area. He teamed up with fellow convict Michael Jones to look for land. They married sisters Jane and Elizabeth Harris, daughters of free settlers, and travelled further north-west to the Coonamble area, 330 miles from Sydney, to set up their farms. The two freed convicts and the Harris sisters became his great-great-grandparents. There are nine convicts in the direct line of his ancestors. He traces their lives against the social and historical background of colonial Australia, presenting a very different picture from the view usually found in school history books. They all thrive, taking advantage of their second chance. This book is the story of their redemption. Besides offering the reader an interesting, sometimes gripping family story, he reveals the cultural continuities in which his ancestors acted and how they responded to those continuities in a totally different physical environment. He seeks to discover to what extent the outlook, culture and character of his ancestors worked to make his extended family and him what they are. And, finally, perhaps most importantly, he sketches a picture of the way Australia developed as a new people and a new nation. In 1950, most Australians had an ancestry like his. Since the publication of Prison Hulk to Redemption in 2016, the author has made many adjustments and additions, besides rewriting passages that could have been clearer. In preparing this second edition, besides thoroughly revising the text, the author stresses the social and cultural continuities to bring out his ideas on what it means to be a people and a nation. These ideas are drawn from his interpretation of Edmund Burke’s political philosophy which he conceives as a Natural Law conservatism. Burke had distinct ideas on how a healthy nation develops and, if it is not careful, how it decays, collapses, and falls prey to takeover.

Clive James On Television

As well as essays, he has published collections of literary and television criticism, travel writing, verse and novels, plus five volumes of autobiography, Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England, May Week Was In June, North Face of ...

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509832432

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 943

His best in one volume, Clive James On Television includes all Clive James's treasured TV criticism, originally written for The Observer between the years 1972 and 1982. From the 1972 Olympics to the 1982 Eurovision Song Contest, here is a decade of the most trenchant, witty and thought-provoking criticism of any kind, with a foreword from Clive James himself, described as 'the funniest man in Britain'. This volume incorporates three collections: Visions Before Midnight, The Crystal Bucket and Glued to the Box.