Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome

These texts add rich new texture to our overall picture of medieval visionary culture and will interest students and scholars of medieval and renaissance history, literature, religion, and women's studies.

Author: Lezlie S. Knox

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 026810204X

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 241

Margherita Colonna (1255–1280) was born into one of the great baronial families that dominated Rome politically and culturally in the thirteenth century. After the death of her father and mother, Margherita was raised by her brothers, including Cardinal Giacomo Colonna. The two extant contemporary accounts of her short life offer a daring model of mystical lay piety forged in imitation of St. Francis but worked out in the vibrant world of medieval Rome. In Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome, Larry F. Field, Lezlie S. Knox, and Sean L. Field present the first English translations of Margherita Colonna’s two “lives” and a dossier of associated texts, along with thoroughly researched contextualization and scholarly examination. The first of the two lives was written by a layman, the Roman Senator Giovanni Colonna, one of Margherita Colonna's brothers. The second was written by a woman named Stefania, who had been a close follower of Margherita Colonna and assumed leadership of her Franciscan community after Margherita's death. These intriguing texts open up new perspectives on numerous historical questions. How did authorial gender and status influence hagiographic perspective? How fluid was the nature of female Franciscan identity during the era in which the papacy was creating the Order of St. Clare? What were the experiences and influences of female visionaries? And what was the process of saint-making at the heart of an aristocratic Roman family? These texts add rich new texture to our overall picture of medieval visionary culture and will interest students and scholars of medieval and renaissance history, literature, religion, and women's studies.

Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome

These intriguing texts open up new perspectives on numerous historical questions. How did authorial gender and status influence hagiographic perspective?

Author: Giovanni Colonna

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780268102036

Category: Christian biography

Page: 217

View: 289

Margherita Colonna (1255-1280) was born into one of the great baronial families that dominated Rome politically and culturally in the thirteenth century. After the death of her father and mother, Margherita was raised by her brothers, including Cardinal Giacomo Colonna. The two extant contemporary accounts of her short life offer a daring model of mystical lay piety forged in imitation of St. Francis but worked out in the vibrant world of medieval Rome. In 'Visions of sainthood in medieval Rome', the authors present the first English translations of Margherita Colonna's two "lives" and a dossier of associated texts, along with thoroughly researched contextualization and scholarly examination. The first of the two lives was written by a layman, the Roman Senator Giovanni Colonna, one of Margherita Colonna's brothers. The second was written by a woman named Stefania, who had been a close follower of Margherita Colonna and assumed leadership of her Franciscan community after Margherita's death. These intriguing texts open up new perspectives on numerous historical questions. How did authorial gender and status influence hagiographic perspective? How fluid was the nature of female Franciscan identity during the era in which the papacy was creating the Order of St. Clare? What were the experiences and influences of female visionaries? And what was the process of saint-making at the heart of an aristocratic Roman family?

The Sacred and the Sinister

... and related texts, published now as Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome: The Lives of Margherita Colonna by Giovanni Colonna and Stefania (Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2017) (hereafter, Visions of Sainthood).

Author: David J. Collins, S. J.

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271084375

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 809

Inspired by the work of eminent scholar Richard Kieckhefer, The Sacred and the Sinister explores the ambiguities that made (and make) medieval religion and magic so difficult to differentiate. The essays in this collection investigate how the holy and unholy were distinguished in medieval Europe, where their characteristics diverged, and the implications of that deviation. In the Middle Ages, the natural world was understood as divinely created and infused with mysterious power. This world was accessible to human knowledge and susceptible to human manipulation through three modes of engagement: religion, magic, and science. How these ways of understanding developed in light of modern notions of rationality is an important element of ongoing scholarly conversation. As Kieckhefer has emphasized, ambiguity and ambivalence characterize medieval understandings of the divine and demonic powers at work in the world. The ten chapters in this volume focus on four main aspects of this assertion: the cult of the saints, contested devotional relationships and practices, unsettled judgments between magic and religion, and inconclusive distinctions between magic and science. Freshly insightful, this study of ambiguity between magic and religion will be of special interest to scholars in the fields of medieval studies, religious studies, European history, and the history of science. In addition to the editor, the contributors to this volume are Michael D. Bailey, Kristi Woodward Bain, Maeve B. Callan, Elizabeth Casteen, Claire Fanger, Sean L. Field, Anne M. Koenig, Katelyn Mesler, and Sophie Page.

Non enim fuerat Evangelii surdus auditor 1 Celano 22 Essays in Honor of Michael W Blastic O F M on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday

Most recently, she has published a collaborative project on the two medieval lives of Margherita Colonna († 1280) with Larry F. Field and Sean L. Field (Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome [University of Notre Dame Press, 2017)].

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004432493

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 451

This collection of essays honors Michael W. Blastic, O.F.M. on his 70th birthday. The contributors address issues within academic areas in which he has taught and published: the Writings of Francis; Franciscan history, hagiography and spirituality; medieval women; and Franciscan theology and philosophy.

Cities of Strangers

For an interesting case from Rome, see Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome: The Lives of Margherita Colonna by Giovanni Colonna and Stefania, ed. and intro. Lezlie S. Knox and Sean L. Field, and trans. Larry L. Field, South Bend, IN, ...

Author: Miri Rubin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110848123X

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 340

Explores how medieval towns and cities received newcomers, and the process by which these 'strangers' became 'neighbours' between 1000 and 1500.

Courting Sanctity

Binghamton, NY: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1986. Blanchon, L'abbé P. Vie de la ... Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider, 1995. Coulon, Auguste, ed. ... trans. Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome: The Lives 236 BIBLIoGraPhy.

Author: Sean L. Field

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501736205

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 741

The rise of the Capetian dynasty across the long thirteenth century, which rested in part on the family's perceived sanctity, is a story most often told through the actions of male figures, from Louis IX's metamorphosis into "Saint Louis" to Philip IV's attacks on Pope Boniface VIII. In Courting Sanctity, Sean L. Field argues that, in fact, holy women were central to the Capetian's self-presentation as being uniquely favored by God. Tracing the shifting relationship between holy women and the French royal court, he shows that the roles and influence of these women were questioned and reshaped under Philip III and increasingly assumed to pose physical, spiritual, and political threats by the time of Philip IV's death. Field's narrative highlights six holy women. The saintly reputations of Isabelle of France and Douceline of Digne helped to crystalize the Capetians' claims of divine favor by 1260. In the 1270s, the French court faced a crisis that centered on the testimony of Elizabeth of Spalbeek, a visionary holy woman from the Low Countries. After 1300, the arrests and interrogations of Paupertas of Metz, Margueronne of Bellevillette, and Marguerite Porete served to bolster Philip IV's crusades against the dangers supposedly threatening the kingdom of France. Courting Sanctity thus reassesses key turning points in the ascent of the "most Christian" Capetian court through examinations of the lives and images of the holy women that the court sanctified or defamed.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

P. Paschini, I Colonna (Rome, 1955). A. Rehberg, Kirche und Macht im römischen Trecento: Die Colonna und ihre Klientel auf dem kurialen Pfründenmarkt (1278–1378) (Tübingen, 1999). L. S. Knox (ed.), Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome: ...

Author: Andrew Louth

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192638157

Category: Religion

Page: 2224

View: 807

Uniquely authoritative and wide-ranging in its scope, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church is the indispensable reference work on all aspects of the Christian Church. It contains over 6,500 cross-referenced A-Z entries, and offers unrivalled coverage of all aspects of this vast and often complex subject, from theology; churches and denominations; patristic scholarship; and the bible; to the church calendar and its organization; popes; archbishops; other church leaders; saints; and mystics. In this new edition, great efforts have been made to increase and strengthen coverage of non-Anglican denominations (for example non-Western European Christianity), as well as broadening the focus on Christianity and the history of churches in areas beyond Western Europe. In particular, there have been extensive additions with regards to the Christian Church in Asia, Africa, Latin America, North America, and Australasia. Significant updates have also been included on topics such as liturgy, Canon Law, recent international developments, non-Anglican missionary activity, and the increasingly important area of moral and pastoral theology, among many others. Since its first appearance in 1957, the ODCC has established itself as an essential resource for ordinands, clergy, and members of religious orders, and an invaluable tool for academics, teachers, and students of church history and theology, as well as for the general reader.

New Saints in Late Mediaeval Venice 1200 1500

In André Vauchez, Sainthood in the Later Middle Ages, translated by Jean Birrell. 29–30. ... In Centre and Periphery: Studies on Power in the Medieval World in Honor of William Chester Jordan, ... Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome.

Author: Karen E. McCluskey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351103555

Category: Religion

Page: 268

View: 814

This book focuses on the comparatively unknown cults of new saints in late-mediaeval Venice. These new saints were near-contemporary citizens who were venerated by their compatriots without official sanction from the papacy. In doing so, the book uncovers a sub-culture of religious expression that has been overlooked in previous scholarship. The study highlights a myriad of hagiographical materials, both visual and textual, created to honour these new saints by members of four different Venetian communities: The Republican government; the monastic orders, mostly Benedictine; the mendicant orders; and local parishes. By scrutinising the hagiographic portraits described in painted vita panels, written vitae, passiones, votive images, sermons and sepulchre monuments, as well as archival and historical resources, the book identifies a specifically Venetian typology of sanctity tied to the idiosyncrasies of the city’s site and history. By focusing explicitly on local typological traits, the book produces an intimate and complex portrait of Venetian society and offers a framework for exploring the lived religious experience of late-mediaeval societies beyond the lagoon. As a result, it will be of keen interest to scholars of Venice, lived religion, hagiography, mediaeval history and visual culture.

The Virtues of Economy

Governance, Power, and Piety in Late Medieval Rome James A. Palmer ... 3 (2013): 554–75; Lezlie S. Knox and Sean L. Field, eds., Visions of Sainthood in Medieval Rome: The Lives of Margherita Colonna by Giovanni Colonna and Stefania, ...

Author: James A. Palmer

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501742388

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 692

The humanist perception of fourteenth-century Rome as a slumbering ruin awaiting the Renaissance and the return of papal power has cast a long shadow on the historiography of the city. Challenging this view, James A. Palmer argues that Roman political culture underwent dramatic changes in the late Middle Ages, with profound and lasting implications for city's subsequent development. The Virtues of Economy examines the transformation of Rome's governing elites as a result of changes in the city's economic, political, and spiritual landscape. Palmer explores this shift through the history of Roman political society, its identity as an urban commune, and its once-and-future role as the spiritual capital of Latin Christendom. Tracing the contours of everyday Roman politics, The Virtues of Economy reframes the reestablishment of papal sovereignty in Rome as the product of synergy between papal ambitions and local political culture. More broadly, Palmer emphasizes Rome's distinct role in evolution of medieval Italy's city-communes.

Visions in Late Medieval England

The demise of Henry VI's cult Although strengthened and shaped by the two models—saints as visionaries and as ... But in one of those cruel twists of fate, before sainthood could come to pass, Henry VIII severed relations with Rome.

Author: Gwenfair Walters Adams

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047419251

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 914

This volume is the first to explore the breadth of vision types in late medieval English lay spirituality. Analyzing 1000+ accounts, it proposes that visions buttressed five core dynamics (relating to purgatory, saints, demons, sacramental faith, and the Church’s authority).