Why Don t Students Like School

This book offers you the research, and the arguments, that will help you become a more effective teacher." —Joe Riener, English teacher, Wilson High School, Washington, D.C. Why Don't Students Like School? now comes with online discussion ...

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470730454

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 503

Easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn. It reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences. Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the classroom Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop "thinking skills" without facts How an understanding of the brain's workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills "Mr. Willingham's answers apply just as well outside the classroom. Corporate trainers, marketers and, not least, parents -anyone who cares about how we learn-should find his book valuable reading." —Wall Street Journal

Why Don t Students Like School

This edition will be a valuable resource for both veteran and novice teachers, teachers-in-training, and for the principals, administrators, and staff development professionals who work with them.

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: Jossey-Bass

ISBN: 9781119715665

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 977

Why Don’t Students Like School? Second Edition features 25% updated material while still honoring the classic, beloved approaches of the original. The book draws its themes from the most frequently asked questions in his "Ask the Cognitive Scientist" column in the American Educator, such as -- How can I teach students the skills they need when standardized testing just requires facts? Why do students remembers everything on TV, but forget everything I say? How should I adjust my teaching for different learning styles? The second edition will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn and reveals the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences. This edition will be a valuable resource for both veteran and novice teachers, teachers-in-training, and for the principals, administrators, and staff development professionals who work with them.

Why Don t Students Like School

This book offers you the research, and the arguments, that will help you become a more effective teacher." —Joe Riener, English teacher, Wilson High School, Washington, D.C. Why Don't Students Like School? now comes with online discussion ...

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470730439

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 459

Easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham focuses his acclaimed research on the biological and cognitive basis of learning. His book will help teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn. It reveals-the importance of story, emotion, memory, context, and routine in building knowledge and creating lasting learning experiences. Nine, easy-to-understand principles with clear applications for the classroom Includes surprising findings, such as that intelligence is malleable, and that you cannot develop "thinking skills" without facts How an understanding of the brain's workings can help teachers hone their teaching skills "Mr. Willingham's answers apply just as well outside the classroom. Corporate trainers, marketers and, not least, parents -anyone who cares about how we learn-should find his book valuable reading." —Wall Street Journal

Why Students Don t Like Schools

This book describes the struggle of every Indian student and lacks in the educational system of India.

Author: Sanjeev K. Mishra

Publisher: Sanjeev K. Mishra

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page:

View: 562

This book describes the struggle of every Indian student and lacks in the educational system of India.

The Reading Mind

This book should be standard fare in every doctoral education course on reading." —Isabel L. Beck, Professor Emerita, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh "This is another of Willingham's essential books for educational ...

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119301378

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 238

A Map to the Magic of Reading Stop for a moment and wonder: what's happening in your brain right now—as you read this paragraph? How much do you know about the innumerable and amazing connections that your mind is making as you, in a flash, make sense of this request? Why does it matter? The Reading Mind is a brilliant, beautifully crafted, and accessible exploration of arguably life's most important skill: reading. Daniel T. Willingham, the bestselling author of Why Don't Students Like School?, offers a perspective that is rooted in contemporary cognitive research. He deftly describes the incredibly complex and nearly instantaneous series of events that occur from the moment a child sees a single letter to the time they finish reading. The Reading Mind explains the fascinating journey from seeing letters, then words, sentences, and so on, with the author highlighting each step along the way. This resource covers every aspect of reading, starting with two fundamental processes: reading by sight and reading by sound. It also addresses reading comprehension at all levels, from reading for understanding at early levels to inferring deeper meaning from texts and novels in high school. The author also considers the undeniable connection between reading and writing, as well as the important role of motivation as it relates to reading. Finally, as a cutting-edge researcher, Willingham tackles the intersection of our rapidly changing technology and its effects on learning to read and reading. Every teacher, reading specialist, literacy coach, and school administrator will find this book invaluable. Understanding the fascinating science behind the magic of reading is essential for every educator. Indeed, every "reader" will be captivated by the dynamic but invisible workings of their own minds.

When Can You Trust the Experts

Unlike other experts who try to persuade teachers to simply adopt their views, Willingham gives nonscientists the tools and knowledge they need to wade into the research and draw their own conclusions." —RANDI WEINGARTEN, president, ...

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118233271

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 836

Clear, easy principles to spot what's nonsense and what's reliable Each year, teachers, administrators, and parents face a barrage of new education software, games, workbooks, and professional development programs purporting to be "based on the latest research." While some of these products are rooted in solid science, the research behind many others is grossly exaggerated. This new book, written by a top thought leader, helps everyday teachers, administrators, and family members—who don't have years of statistics courses under their belts—separate the wheat from the chaff and determine which new educational approaches are scientifically supported and worth adopting. Author's first book, Why Don't Students Like School?, catapulted him to superstar status in the field of education Willingham's work has been hailed as "brilliant analysis" by The Wall Street Journal and "a triumph" by The Washington Post Author blogs for The Washington Post and Brittanica.com, and writes a column for American Educator In this insightful book, thought leader and bestselling author Dan Willingham offers an easy, reliable way to discern which programs are scientifically supported and which are the equivalent of "educational snake oil."

Raising Kids Who Read

Like Willingham's much-lauded previous work, Why Don't Students Like School?, this new book combines evidence-based analysis with engaging, insightful recommendations for the future.

Author: Daniel T. Willingham

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118769724

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 654

How parents and educators can teach kids to love reading in the digital age Everyone agrees that reading is important, but kids today tend to lose interest in reading before adolescence. In Raising Kids Who Read, bestselling author and psychology professor Daniel T. Willingham explains this phenomenon and provides practical solutions for engendering a love of reading that lasts into adulthood. Like Willingham's much-lauded previous work, Why Don't Students Like School?, this new book combines evidence-based analysis with engaging, insightful recommendations for the future. Intellectually rich argumentation is woven seamlessly with entertaining current cultural references, examples, and steps for taking action to encourage reading. The three key elements for reading enthusiasm—decoding, comprehension, and motivation—are explained in depth in Raising Kids Who Read. Teachers and parents alike will appreciate the practical orientation toward supporting these three elements from birth through adolescence. Most books on the topic focus on early childhood, but Willingham understands that kids' needs change as they grow older, and the science-based approach in Raising Kids Who Read applies to kids of all ages. A practical perspective on teaching reading from bestselling author and K-12 education expert Daniel T. Willingham Research-based, concrete suggestions to aid teachers and parents in promoting reading as a hobby Age-specific tips for developing decoding ability, comprehension, and motivation in kids from birth through adolescence Information on helping kids with dyslexia and encouraging reading in the digital age Debunking the myths about reading education, Raising Kids Who Read will empower you to share the joy of reading with kids from preschool through high school.

Learn or Die

... Scott B. Shadrick, and Michael I. Prevou, “Think Like a Commander Prototype:
Instructor's Guide to Adaptive Thinking,” ... Heuristics and Biases,” Science 185,
4157 (1974): 1124–1131; Daniel T. Willingham, Why Don't Students Like School
 ...

Author: Edward D. Hess

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538278

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 219

To compete with today's increasing globalization and rapidly evolving technologies, individuals and organizations must take their ability to learn—the foundation for continuous improvement, operational excellence, and innovation—to a much higher level. In Learn or Die, Edward D. Hess combines recent advances in neuroscience, psychology, behavioral economics, and education with key research on high-performance businesses to create an actionable blueprint for becoming a leading-edge learning organization. Learn or Die examines the process of learning from an individual and an organizational standpoint. From an individual perspective, the book discusses the cognitive, emotional, motivational, attitudinal, and behavioral factors that promote better learning. Organizationally, Learn or Die focuses on the kinds of structures, culture, leadership, employee learning behaviors, and human resource policies that are necessary to create an environment that enables critical and innovative thinking, learning conversations, and collaboration. The volume also provides strategies to mitigate the reality that humans can be reflexive, lazy thinkers who seek confirmation of what they believe to be true and affirmation of their self-image. Exemplar learning organizations discussed include the secretive Bridgewater Associates, LP; Intuit, Inc.; United Parcel Service (UPS); W. L. Gore & Associates; and IDEO.

Facilitating Seven Ways of Learning

A Resource for More Purposeful, Effective, and Enjoyable College Teaching
James R. Davis, Bridget D. Arend ... 3 (1968): 273–81, as quoted in Daniel T.
Willingham, Why Don't Students Like School? A Cognitive Psychologist Answers
 ...

Author: James R. Davis

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 1579228437

Category: Education

Page: 326

View: 422

For teachers in higher education who haven’t been able to catch up with developments in teaching and learning, James Davis and Bridget Arend offer an introduction that focuses on seven coherent and proven evidence-based strategies. The underlying rationale is to provide a framework to match teaching goals to distinct ways of learning, based on well-established theories of learning. The authors present approaches that readers can readily and safely experiment with to achieve desired learning outcomes, and build confidence in changing their methods of teaching. Research on learning clearly demonstrates that learning is not one thing, but many. The learning associated with developing a skill is different from the learning associated with understanding and remembering information, which in turn is different from thinking critically and creatively, solving problems, making decisions, or change paradigms in the light of evidence. Differing outcomes involve different ways of learning and teaching strategies. The authors provide the reader with a conceptual approach for selecting appropriate teaching strategies for different types of content, and for achieving specific learning objectives. They demonstrate through examples how a focused and purposeful selection of activities improves student performance, and in the process makes for a more effective and satisfying teaching experience. The core of the book presents a chapter on each of the seven ways of learning. Each chapter offers a full description of the process, illustrates its application with examples from different academic fields and types of institutions, clearly describes the teacher’s facilitation role, and covers assessment and online use. The seven ways of learning are: Behavioral Learning; Cognitive Learning; Learning through Inquiry; Learning with Mental Models; Learning through Groups and Teams; Learning through Virtual Realities; and Experiential Learning. Along the way, the authors provide the reader with a basis for evaluating other approaches to teaching and other learning methodologies so that she or he can confidently go beyond the “seven ways” to adapt or adopt further strategies. This is the ideal companion for teachers who are beginning to explore new ways of teaching, and want to do some serious independent thinking about learning. The book can also be used to prepare graduate students for teaching, and will be welcomed by centers for teaching and learning to help continuing faculty re-examine a particular aspect of their teaching.

Education Technology and the Failure of American Schools

The content of the middle school experience will come from the digital content
database, but the instructional materials components of ... Learning, like life, is a
journey with many stages. ... Daniel Willingham, Why Don't Students Like School
?

Author: Charles K. Stallard

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1475811136

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 732

Education Technology and the Failure of American Schools offers a broad and penetrating look at the American educational system to determine why progress is so lacking. What is found is a system that has far outlived its functionality in terms of governance, organization, and professional practices.

Teach Like Nobody s Watching

It is also often possible to host a talk at your own school, for pupils and staff,
especially if you invite other schools from your ... As we discussed in Part I, in his
seminal book Why Don't Students Like School?, Daniel Willingham points out
that ...

Author: Mark Enser

Publisher: Crown House Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 1785834541

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 760

In Teach Like Nobody's Watching: The essential guide to effective and efficient teaching, Mark Enser sets out a time-efficient approach to teaching that will reduce teachers' workload and enhance their pupils' levels of engagement and attainment. At a time when schools are crying out for more autonomy and trust, teacher and bestselling author Mark Enser asks educators the critical question How would you teach if nobody were watching? and empowers them with the tools and confidence to do just that. Mark argues that a quality education is rooted in simplicity. In this book he convincingly strips away the layers of contradictory pedagogical advice that teachers have received over the years and lends weight to the three key pillars that underpin effective, efficient teaching: the lesson, the curriculum and the school's support structure. Teach Like Nobody's Watching explores these three core elements in detail, and presents teachers with a range of practical, time-efficient approaches to help them reclaim their professional agency and ensure that their pupils get the excellent education they deserve. Part I considers the individual lesson and explores how lessons can be built around four simple elements: recap, input, application and feedback. Each chapter considers one aspect of the lesson in turn and discusses its importance with a particular focus on how educational research can be applied to it in the classroom, how it might look in different subjects, and the potential pitfalls to avoid. Part II recognises that lessons don't happen in isolation but as part of a wider curriculum. This section tackles: the creation of a programme of study that takes pupils on a journey through your subject; the super-curriculum of what happens outside the classroom; the principles of assessment design; and how time in departments can be used to reduce workload and support a culture of excellence. Finally, Part III looks at the role of the wider school in supporting teachers to teach like nobody's watching and how leaders can help to set them free from some of the more burdensome pressures. In this section, Mark draws on the experience of school leaders in a range of different contexts to illustrate what they have done to support effective and efficient teaching in their schools. Suitable for all teachers in both primary and secondary schools.


Freedom to Teach and Learn Literature

Concept maps in the classrooms: schools, teachers, and literature 1.1 Why do
schools and teachers have such an impact on the lives of so many? Why do
schools ... 6 WILLINGI-IAM, Daniel T. Why dont students like school? San
Francisco: ...

Author: Marli Merker Moreira

Publisher: Palibrio

ISBN: 1617640492

Category: Education

Page: 118

View: 157

This book is based on the author's practice in teaching and learning literature. It approaches this subject as a privileged context for critical thinking, knowledge construction, and autonomy both for teachers and learners. It emphasizes practice though linking it with theory. Readers will fi nd many examples to clarify explanations. It presents concept mapping as a powerful tool to facilitate one's expression of thinking+feeling+acting when experiencing a literary text. The book offers the opportunity of a hands-on participation in working with concept maps and of interacting with the author through email, if the reader feels like doing it. The aim here is to suggest ways to achieve a context of freedom and autonomy in literature classes as well as to encourage more readers to love reading and literature.

In the Zone

Willingham, DT (2009) Why Don't Students Like School?[online] Available at:
www.ernweb.com/ educational-research-articles/why-dont-students-like-
schoolby-daniel-willingham (accessed 2 January 2020). 6. THE TERROR OF
ERROR ...

Author: Mike Lansdown

Publisher:

ISBN: 1913063887

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 905

At a time when test and examination results still dominate the educational landscape, there is a need to focus on, and support teachers with, the real meaning and purpose of learning. In the Zone concerns itself with important aspects of learning that are not always prominent in government policy and legislation. In particular it argues that challenge is an essential element of true learning, without which there can be no progress. It brings together supportive materials aimed at encouraging teachers to reflect on their present practice, take sensible risks with their teaching, and understand the importance of enjoyment and engagement for both teachers and pupils. Importantly, the book is fully up to date with the new Ofsted Education Inspection Framework and current thinking around positive pupil mental health.

Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports the Common Core

As educators, we need to be intentional about the questions we ask our students
and the strategies we employ to ... Daniel Willingham, author of Why Don't
Students Like School? sums it up well, “Sometimes I think that we, as teachers,
are so ...

Author: Bryan Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317909267

Category: Education

Page: 108

View: 856

Is your classroom culture conducive to the expectations of the Common Core? Teaching content is not enough; students need a classroom structure and atmosphere that will help them learn key academic skills. This practical book will show you how to transform your classroom culture, raise the level of rigor, encourage higher-level questioning and critical thinking, and promote academic discussions. You will also find out how to adjust your classroom management techniques so that students learn to regulate themselves while completing these higher-level tasks. Special Features in Each Chapter: Key Idea—a summary of the essential idea that will be addressed in the chapter Practical strategies—a variety of easy-to-implement ideas that you can try right away Connections to the Common Core State Standards—how the skills taught in this book will help students meet the standards Reflection Questions—thoughtful questions that will help teachers apply their learning to their own classrooms. These questions can be answered independently or used in book study groups. Extend Your Knowledge—creative ideas for extending your knowledge beyond the ideas in this book

Brain Powered Strategies to Engage All Learners

Why don't students like school : A cognitive scientist answers questions about
how the mind works and what it means for the classroom . San Francisco , CA :
Jossey - Bass . Willis , J. 2010. The current impact of neuroscience on teaching
and ...

Author: LaVonna Roth

Publisher: Shell Education

ISBN: 9781425807726

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 755

Benefit from current brain research in a practical, strategy-based approach which provides insight to how students learn most effectively. Brain-based and engaging strategies are included that incorporate movement, kinesthetic learning, organization and graphic organizers, brainstorms and critical thinking, and writing. The included lessons are provided for grades K-2, 3-5, and 6-8 and are aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy. Digital resources are also included containing reproducible teacher resource materials and student activity pages. This resource is correlated to College and Career Readiness and other state standards.

Developing Faculty Learning Communities at Two Year Colleges

Learners need to generate responses with minimal cues, repeatedly over time,
with varied applications. ... might start their investigation of this topic with practical
, accessible, and researchbased books such as Why Don't Students Like School?

Author: Susan Sipple

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 157922847X

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 813

This book introduces community college faculty and faculty developers to the use of faculty learning communities (FLCs) as a means for faculty themselves to investigate and surmount student learning problems they encounter in their classrooms, and as an effective and low-cost strategy for faculty developers working with few resources to stimulate innovative teaching that leads to student persistence and improved learning outcomes. Two-year college instructors face the unique challenge of teaching a mix of learners, from the developmental to high-achievers, that requires using a variety of instructional strategies and techniques. Even the most experienced teachers can find this diversity demanding. Faculty developers at many two-year colleges still rely solely on the one-day workshop model that, while useful, rarely results in sustained student-centered changes in pedagogy or the curriculum, and may not be practicable for the growing cohort of part-time faculty members. By linking work in the classroom with scholarship and reflection, FLCs provide participants with a sense of renewed engagement and stimulate collegial exploration of ways to achieve educational excellence. FLCs are usually faculty-instigated and cross-disciplinary, and comprise groups of six to fifteen faculty that work collaboratively through regular meetings over an extended period of time to promote research and an exchange of experiences, foster community, and develop the scholarship of teaching. FLCs alleviate burnout and isolation, promote the development, testing, and peer review of new classroom strategies or technologies, and lead to the reenergizing and professionalization of teachers. This book introduces the reader to FLCs and to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, offering examples of application in two-year colleges. Individual chapters describe, among others, an FLC set up to support course redesign; an “Adjunct Connectivity FLC” to integrate part-time faculty within a department and collaborate on the curriculum; a cross-disciplinary FLC to promote student self-regulated learning, and improve academic performance and persistence; a critical thinking FLC that sought to define critical thinking in separate disciplines, examine interdisciplinary cross-over of critical thinking, and measure critical thinking more accurately; an FLC that researched the transfer of learning and developed strategies to promote students’ application of their learning across courses and beyond the classroom. Each chapter describes the formation of its FLC, the processes it engaged in, what worked and did not, and the outcomes achieved. Just as when college faculty fail to remain current in their fields, the failure to engage in continuing development of teaching skills, will equally lead teaching and learning to suffer. When two-year college administrators restrain scholarship and reflection as inappropriate for the real work of the institution they are in fact hindering the professionalization of their teaching force that is essential to institutional mission and student success. When FLCs are supported by leaders and administrators, and faculty learn that collaboration and peer review are valued and even expected as part of being a teaching professional, they become intrinsically motivated and committed to collaboratively solving problems, setting the institution on a path to becoming a learning organization that is proactive and adept at navigating change.

Chemistry Education

Willingham, D. (2010) Why Don't Students Like School?, Jossey-Bass, San
Francisco, CA. Hake, R.R. (1998) Interactiveengagement versus traditional
methods: a six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory
physics ...

Author: Javier García-Martínez

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 3527679324

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 792

View: 829

Winner of the CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2017 Award This comprehensive collection of top-level contributions provides a thorough review of the vibrant field of chemistry education. Highly-experienced chemistry professors and education experts cover the latest developments in chemistry learning and teaching, as well as the pivotal role of chemistry for shaping a more sustainable future. Adopting a practice-oriented approach, the current challenges and opportunities posed by chemistry education are critically discussed, highlighting the pitfalls that can occur in teaching chemistry and how to circumvent them. The main topics discussed include best practices, project-based education, blended learning and the role of technology, including e-learning, and science visualization. Hands-on recommendations on how to optimally implement innovative strategies of teaching chemistry at university and high-school levels make this book an essential resource for anybody interested in either teaching or learning chemistry more effectively, from experience chemistry professors to secondary school teachers, from educators with no formal training in didactics to frustrated chemistry students.

Experiential Learning

Vannoy, J., “Generality of Cognitive Complexity-Simplicity as a Personality
Construct,” Journal of Personality and Social ... American Educator, 29(2) (2005),
31–35. , Why Don't Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers
Questions ...

Author: David A. Kolb

Publisher: FT Press

ISBN: 0133892506

Category: Education

Page: 99998

View: 211

Experiential learning is a powerful and proven approach to teaching and learning that is based on one incontrovertible reality: people learn best through experience. Now, in this extensively updated book, David A. Kolb offers a systematic and up-to-date statement of the theory of experiential learning and its modern applications to education, work, and adult development. Experiential Learning, Second Edition builds on the intellectual origins of experiential learning as defined by figures such as John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, Jean Piaget, and L.S. Vygotsky, while also reflecting three full decades of research and practice since the classic first edition. Kolb models the underlying structures of the learning process based on the latest insights in psychology, philosophy, and physiology. Building on his comprehensive structural model, he offers an exceptionally useful typology of individual learning styles and corresponding structures of knowledge in different academic disciplines and careers. Kolb also applies experiential learning to higher education and lifelong learning, especially with regard to adult education. This edition reviews recent applications and uses of experiential learning, updates Kolb's framework to address the current organizational and educational landscape, and features current examples of experiential learning both in the field and in the classroom. It will be an indispensable resource for everyone who wants to promote more effective learning: in higher education, training, organizational development, lifelong learning environments, and online.

Teacher Proof

Why research in education doesn't always mean what it claims, and what you can
do about it Tom Bennett ... Daniel T. Willingham's Why Don't Students Like
School? is a must read for teachers and educators who want to survey what
science ...

Author: Tom Bennett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135040281

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 170

‘Tom Bennett is the voice of the modern teacher.’ - Stephen Drew, Senior Vice-Principal, Passmores Academy, UK, featured on Channel 4’s Educating Essex Do the findings from educational science ever really improve the day-to-day practice of classroom teachers? Education is awash with theories about how pupils best learn and teachers best teach, most often propped up with the inevitable research that ‘proves’ the case in point. But what can teachers do to find the proof within the pudding, and how can this actually help them on wet Wednesday afternoon?. Drawing from a wide range of recent and popular education theories and strategies, Tom Bennett highlights how much of what we think we know in schools hasn’t been ‘proven’ in any meaningful sense at all. He inspires teachers to decide for themselves what good and bad education really is, empowering them as professionals and raising their confidence in the classroom and the staffroom alike. Readers are encouraged to question and reflect on issues such as: the most common ideas in modern education and where these ideas were born the crisis in research right now how research is commissioned and used by the people who make policy in the UK and beyond the provenance of education research: who instigates it, who writes it, and how to spot when a claim is based on evidence and when it isn’t the different way that data can be analysed what happens to the research conclusions once they escape the laboratory. Controversial, erudite and yet unremittingly entertaining, Tom includes practical suggestions for the classroom throughout. This book will be an ally to every teacher who’s been handed an instruction on a platter and been told, ‘the research proves it.’