Tissue Repair Contraction and the Myofibroblast

Tissue Repair, Contraction and the Myofibroblast summarizes the latest findings concerning the biology of the myofibroblast, a cell involved in the evolution and contraction of granulation tissue and of fibrotic changes.

Author: Christine Chaponnier

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387336508

Category: Science

Page: 142

View: 568

Tissue Repair, Contraction and the Myofibroblast summarizes the latest findings concerning the biology of the myofibroblast, a cell involved in the evolution and contraction of granulation tissue and of fibrotic changes. Coverage shows that the myofibroblast is responsible for the development of hypertrophic scars, pulmonary and renal fibrosis and bronchial asthma. Reviews the cell biology and pathology of the myofibroblast as well as mechanisms of fibrosis evolution in many organs and tissues.





WOUND HEALING FIBROSIS AND THE MYOFIBROBLAST

This book aims to draw a concise yet complete description of the conceptual evolution of wound healing, fibrosis and fibrosis-related pathologies from antiquity to present time, as well as commenting on the role of the myofibroblast and the ...

Author: Giulio Gabbiani

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0323906591

Category: Medical

Page: 132

View: 700

Wound Healing, and the Myofibroblast: A Historical and Biological Perspective is the fruit of an interdisciplinary and international collaboration involving a historian of medicine (Dr. Zampieri), a physician (Dr. Coen), and a researcher (Prof. Gabbiani, world-renowned for his discovery of the myofibroblast). This book aims to draw a concise yet complete description of the conceptual evolution of wound healing, fibrosis and fibrosis-related pathologies from antiquity to present time, as well as commenting on the role of the myofibroblast and the key cell type essential for tissue repair and fibrosis (from its identification in 1971 throughout its 50-years-old history). By viewing this complex and century-long history from different perspectives, the book's authors aim to draw an exhaustive overview, with the hope of inspiring new and fruitful basic and clinical research. Interdisciplinary collaboration: complementary views from medical historian, a physician and a researcher A concise but detailed history of fibrosis, readers can discover the major scientific breakthroughs along this history Includes the pathophysiology of various fibrotic diseases Explores the role of myofibroblast in fibrosis development

Underlying Mechanisms Regulating Gingival Healing and Fibrosis

Successful wound healing involves tightly controlled regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and remodeling, and myofibroblast-mediated wound contraction, to restore normal tissue function.

Author: Shawna Soheun Kim

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 485

Successful wound healing involves tightly controlled regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and remodeling, and myofibroblast-mediated wound contraction, to restore normal tissue function. However, these events involved in healing are also associated with development of tissue fibrosis, which is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM and the presence of myofibroblasts. Increasing evidence suggests that periostin is a critical player in regulating skin healing and fibrosis. In contrast to most adult tissues, gingival connective tissue is known to heal more rapidly and with less scarring, yet is still associated with fibrosis, such as drug-induced gingival enlargement. The aim of this study is to understand the mechanism of gingival healing and fibrosis, and to describe the role of periostin. Chapter 2 demonstrates that during wound healing of rat gingiva, periostin upregulation coincides with collagen and fibronectin deposition, while only few myofibroblasts are evident. Although periostin has no influence over myofibroblast differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs), it induces synthesis of collagen and fibronectin proteins. Chapters 3-4 and Appendix 4 show that periostin is highly upregulated by nifedipine and phenytoin in gingiva, and the drugs increase periostin through TGF-b signaling in HGFs. Such increase of periostin also coincides with greater ECM deposition, while myofibroblasts are absent. As adhesive signaling is critical in myofibroblast differentiation, Chapter 5 demonstrates that HGFs cultured on smooth titanium topography have more mature focal adhesions and greater phosphorylated-focal adhesion kinase, compared to HGFs on rough substratum. HGFs cultured on smooth titanium are also associated with greater gene expressions of periostin and CCN2, fibronectin deposition, and more myofibroblast differentiation, compared to HGFs on rough topography. The overall findings from this thesis are that periostin is a pro-fibrotic protein in gingiva, where it increases matrix synthesis, but not myofibroblast differentiation of gingival fibroblasts, to regulate healing as well as contributing to fibrosis. While seemingly not normally active in gingival fibroblasts, adhesive signaling can be induced resulting in the cells assuming a fibrotic phenotype. Furthermore, this study shows that increased stiffness of the culture substratum does not induce myofibroblast differentiation if cell attachment sites are physically restricted.